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Street Children

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988 | From Reuters
The Philippines now has about 2 million homeless street children who exist by selling cigarettes, begging, or crime and prostitution, the state-run Philippine News Agency reported Friday.
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WORLD
November 14, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
As Barack Obama prepares for the first visit by a United States president to Cambodia this month, the country is reportedly preparing for him too -- by hiding street children from sight in Phnom Penh. “If the leaders from across … the world see beggars and children on the street, they might speak negatively to the government,” municipal spokesman Long Dimanche told the Phnom Penh Post , explaining their plans to “collect” children who beg or sell fruit and put them in a nearby center.
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NEWS
February 24, 1989 | From Reuters
About 2,500 street children marched through downtown Guatemala City on Thursday to demand respect for children's rights. The youngsters walked 14 blocks from the National Palace to City Hall, where they called on Mayor Alvaro Arzu to declare Feb. 23 "Day of the Street Child."
WORLD
November 27, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Ibrahim Shaban said he was 15, but he looked much younger in his pajama pants and sweat shirt with the worn-away rhinestones, dirt caked on his bare feet, a knife scar on his face. He strolled through the crowds in Tahrir Square the other day, watching banners unfurl, listening to speeches. He sometimes sounded like a miniature rebel, distilling the nation's rage in his narrow body. "My father died a month ago, so I've been living in the square," he said. "He had heart problems. He sold cups and glasses in the street.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | Reuters
Three policemen were detained Sunday after a survivor of Friday's killings of street children identified them as having taken part in the massacre, a police official said Sunday. Inaldo Santana, deputy chief of the special case squad, said a judge was expected to issue a warrant for the arrest of the three, being held at police headquarters. The three were picked out of a lineup by Wagner dos Santos, 22, who survived the massacre.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | TOVA CHAPOVAL, REUTERS
Like thousands of other children and adolescents, 17-year-old Adriana de Souza has a family but for a long time her home was the streets of Salvador, a port city in Brazil's tropical northeast. Adriana took drugs, got pregnant at 15 and induced an abortion by taking dangerous medication. But today Adriana's life has turned around. She has learned to read and write, has a job and, most important, has returned home to live with her mother.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Death squads are killing hundreds of street children in Brazil's cities, possibly at the rate of one a day, Amnesty International said today. Many more children, forced onto the streets to support their families, are being beaten and tortured by police, the London-based human rights group said. "Poor children in Brazil are treated with contempt by the authorities, risking their lives simply by being on the streets," Amnesty said in a report.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A former police officer convicted of murder in a shooting rampage in which eight street children died was declared innocent Thursday at his retrial. Nelson Oliveira dos Santos Cunha, 29, was sentenced in November to 261 years in jail on eight charges of murder and one of attempted murder in the 1993 incident. Under Brazilian law, anyone sentenced to more than 20 years in jail for a crime has the automatic right to a retrial. "This decision shames our society," said Rio Dist. Atty.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The AIDS virus is spreading among the legions of ragged street children in Brazil, and experts fear that these offspring of urban poverty may suffer a disastrous epidemic of the disease. According to estimates based on census data, Brazil has 7 million minors with little or no adult supervision, 3 million of them in the metropolitan areas of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. These abandoned children are seen as an AIDS risk group because of sexual promiscuity and drug abuse. "I believe that this group, if not given special treatment, will become an atomic bomb loose in the city," said Dr. Carlos Jose Carvalho, medical director of the National Foundation for the Welfare of Minors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
It's past midnight in this border city, and the downtown streets are throbbing. Disco music blares from clubs and cantinas. The screeching siren and revolving lights of a passing squad car barely turn a head. Overdressed working girls linger in the shadows. At the entrance to "burlesque" shows, men outfitted in black waist coats and frilly white shirts attempt to entice foreign tourists inside. "Wanna see Mexican ladies?" one entreats. "No cover charge. No minimum."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Eric Pape, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the long history of music, there have been improbable success stories. But even in such company, as a drunk man in the French documentary "Benda Bilili!" argues, there has never been anything like the Congolese "street-orchestra" Staff Benda Bilili. Or as the band's 55-year-old leader Leon "Papa Ricky" Likabu explained during the group's recent stop in Paris to support the film's opening: "Since God created the world, no one has seen five or six disabled guys play music like this.
WORLD
January 31, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
Clifford Berrette, 11 years old and 4 feet tall, moved like a determined little man through the choking exhaust of the bus terminal in scuffed white sneakers, unnoticed in the crush of people hurrying to leave town. He picked up a rag from the ground and began to wipe the dirt off a blue minibus, clambering up bumpers and tires to reach the high spots. A taller boy started to clean the vehicle too, but Clifford wasn't going to let him horn in; he shoved him away. Then he extended a small palm to the driver.
WORLD
February 21, 2009 | Mark Magnier
Shekhar Sahni has a cocky air, a music player filled with Hindi tunes and a swagger befitting someone who's beaten the odds in a culture where it's drummed into you early to accept your fate. The 21-year-old grew up on India's rough streets and dreams of becoming a Bollywood star. Sahni liked the hit film "Slumdog Millionaire," which is up for 10 Oscars on Sunday, including best picture, but he was not particularly impressed by the way it depicted street life.
WORLD
February 17, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
She has a baby in her arms and another growing inside. She says she knows about love, says she found it on the streets, where boys fight with razors and a one-armed glue-huffer whispers the pretty things a girl yearns to hear before she curls and sleeps in the abandoned buildings that clutter Cairo's heart. Amira Osman Dakhly left the streets a few days ago, rushing past the new houses on the hill to the homeless shelter, the one with yellow walls and toddlers in the courtyard.
WORLD
June 7, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
The bank manager's tone was crisp and efficient. "Name?" he asked. "Amit," came the reply from beneath a grimy white baseball cap. "Father's name?" asked the manager, 14 years old and all business. "Sanjay," said the customer, 13. With his identity thus established, Amit Kumar Tripathi withdrew 330 rupees, or about $8.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Noha El-Hennawy, Times Staff Writer
"Cairo is very beautiful from above; I wish it were as beautiful from below," said little Mokhna, contemplating the glamour of the city's night life while standing on a hill on the outskirts. However, the lights, the posh facade, the glitter of urban modernity seen from the hilltop do not match the teenager's version of Cairo, where she and her family endure poverty, insecurity and abuse.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confident in his tattered costume, Alioue Seydi, 19, might have been playing a role drawn from his own life on the streets. The role was that of Gorgi, a typical street kid of Dakar. Abandoned by his father, left by his mother in the care of an ailing grandfather, Gorgi begins to skip school. At present he finds himself among a gang of pickpockets out of "Oliver Twist," spending his spare hours sniffing glue and gasoline.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | PETER McFARREN, Associated Press
When this city of 350,000 goes to bed, it is time for Sister Stephany and Father Henry to load bread and plastic jugs of hot milk onto their pickup truck and set out into the night. They go in search of the hundreds of children whose only home is the streets. A third of the children they will find, some as young as 5, are cocaine-paste addicts or sniffers of glue or gasoline. Others have been abandoned by their parents or come from homes of unemployed workers where there is not enough food.
WORLD
June 21, 2007 | Zeena Kareem and Tina Susman, Times Staff Writers
One photograph shows a skin-and-bones boy lying on a bare floor, leashed like a dog to the pink bars of an unoccupied crib. Another shows boys curled naked on the ground, one of them smeared with human waste. The scenes were ghastly. But almost as jarring was the response of an Iraqi government minister called upon Wednesday to explain how a state-run orphanage in the capital could have kept two dozen children in such conditions.
WORLD
April 22, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Atefeh is one of the younger members of Iran's merchant class. Her sales territory is the notorious traffic jams of north Tehran. She moves in on potential clients when the light turns red, pressing her face to car windows, cocking her head to one side and putting on a plaintive face. At 12, she isn't as good at plaintive as some of her younger competitors, two boys who are hawking Koranic inscriptions and balloons just up the street. Sometimes her face looks more furious than sad.
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