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NEWS
July 30, 1995
We on the east side of West Hollywood have had a long, hard battle in curbing street prostitution (Westside, July 20). Now, after some success, and after finally getting our city to support us in the battle, the Gay and Lesbian Center intends to undercut us with a "drop-in center" for young hustlers. This will provide them with showers, laundry services, food, apparently penicillin and rubbers, and other support services. Presumably, they can then save their money for important things such as drugs.
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OPINION
February 27, 2014
Re "Can't tell a course by its title," Opinion, Feb. 24 Rob Stephenson is right about course titles that may not convey exactly what a student learned. A subtitle would make "Street-Fighting Mathematics," a class he cites that I teach at MIT, more understandable. The book the course is based on is subtitled, "The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving. " Even so, it got a one-star Amazon.com review from a reader who was upset that it did not contain "remedial activities for street kids.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Seeing "Shoah," Claude Lanzmann's 9 1/2-hour Holocaust documentary, in a movie theater was difficult for many because of both the length and the subject matter. On videocassette, it may find acceptance in the rental market. Paramount released the five-cassette set last week, and at $300 a set the sales market will be limited. Lanzmann said he knows of many people who have seen part of "Shoah" but not all of it.
WORLD
September 12, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan — When 14-year-old Khorshid took to her skateboard, her face would light up with an enormous smile. For an Afghan girl whose short life had been filled with hardships, the swooping and whooshing and rocketing speed were an undreamed-of taste of freedom. Khorshid, together with her little sister and two teenage boys who were her friends from Kabul's first and only skateboarding school, were among the six Afghan civilians who died in a weekend suicide bombing in Kabul, the international nonprofit group Skateistan said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Pham never set out to be the Pied Piper of Vietnam. He just figured, back in '97, that he'd help a few street kids with some new clothes and food. That would be that, and he'd head home to Australia. But after a few days in Ho Chi Minh City, when word spread among the street kids that a stranger with a generous heart was in town, a pack of 20 scruffy children was soon at Pham's heels. Within a week, their number had grown to 60.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Noha El-Hennawy, Times Staff Writer
"Cairo is very beautiful from above; I wish it were as beautiful from below," said little Mokhna, contemplating the glamour of the city's night life while standing on a hill on the outskirts. However, the lights, the posh facade, the glitter of urban modernity seen from the hilltop do not match the teenager's version of Cairo, where she and her family endure poverty, insecurity and abuse.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | BART JONES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gathering backstage, the symphonic orchestra is the usual preconcert cacophony of instruments being tuned. But there's an added clamor here: the yammering in street slang and the roughhousing. One musician has a 39-stitch scar across his face from a gang fight. Another lived in an abandoned car for a year when he was an 8-year-old runaway. They belong to what organizers say is the only symphony in Latin America made up of former street kids, gang members, drug users and abused children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1999 | HANS GREIMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Her stringy green hair dyed gold, her emerald eyes framed by lavender liner, she steps out of the limo--a real-life Cinderella in a purple satin dress. People on the sidewalk stop to stare as the girl and her handsome date move from the twilight into a shimmering, candle-lit ballroom for a four-course meal and a night of music and dancing. "It feels so good to be looked at like human beings," said the 18-year-old known as Cuddles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990
Blankenhorn's article wonders why there are not more grandmothers and mothers around to teach the kids morality. The answer is the grandmothers and mothers have to work in order to make ends meet in our inflated economy. They are the reason there are "more new jobs and less unemployment," a most unreasonable and false acclaim. Let's put the mothers and grandmothers back home so the street kids have somewhere to go. LANG LEE Newport Beach
NEWS
October 29, 1995
In an old U.S. Armory, five days a week, about 50 youths train at the Montebello Police Activities League Boxing Club under the watchful eye of Andy Placencia, a former amateur fighter, and four other trainers. "Most of the kids are young, 16 and under," Placencia says. "We have a lot of the tough street kids." Still, he has high expectations. "Boxing is good, but it's secondary," he says. "I would love to see them all become outstanding members of their communities. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Abandoned as a 3-year-old on the streets of Guatemala City, Marlon Alexander Lux Bal ate what he picked from trash cans and curled up each night on a concrete stoop. His friends, who also were orphans, never stuck around for long. Everyone seemed to want to steal what little he had. You can only trust yourself. That's what life seemed to say. Now, Alex, 18, is sitting around a dinner table at a Boyle Heights homeless shelter with six other young men, passing tortillas and tubs of butter on Easter night.
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009 | By Mike Ives, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Nguyen Duc Canh says he used to stay at Vietnam's only "1,000-star hotel." Translation: He grew up under a bridge. Abandoned by his parents in Hanoi, Canh sold chewing gum to tourists. When he was 8 years old, police officers took him to a government-run social protection center. "It was a difficult life," Canh recalls. But with no education or support network, what was the alternative? He stayed at the center for 12 years, until a friend told him about KOTO -- Know One, Teach One -- a two-year program that trains former street kids to cook, wait tables and speak English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Noha El-Hennawy, Times Staff Writer
"Cairo is very beautiful from above; I wish it were as beautiful from below," said little Mokhna, contemplating the glamour of the city's night life while standing on a hill on the outskirts. However, the lights, the posh facade, the glitter of urban modernity seen from the hilltop do not match the teenager's version of Cairo, where she and her family endure poverty, insecurity and abuse.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2007 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
QUANELL X stared confidently into the television camera and told a heart-tugging tale about the frail man sitting by his side: Dennis Garnier was roughed up and disrespected, all because police didn't have their facts straight. A SWAT team burst into his house and hogtied him. It had the wrong address; the drug dealer lived a few doors down. Garnier has suffered memory loss and has become so scared of guns that he can't work as a security guard anymore.
WORLD
April 22, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Atefeh is one of the younger members of Iran's merchant class. Her sales territory is the notorious traffic jams of north Tehran. She moves in on potential clients when the light turns red, pressing her face to car windows, cocking her head to one side and putting on a plaintive face. At 12, she isn't as good at plaintive as some of her younger competitors, two boys who are hawking Koranic inscriptions and balloons just up the street. Sometimes her face looks more furious than sad.
WORLD
April 11, 2004 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Homeless boys who sleep in the trampled shrubbery surrounding St. Peter's Church used to earn their daily plate of rice and beans from a man they called Papa, a surly vagrant who carried a rock in one hand and a cellphone in the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1991
In response to "Another Risky Road," by Kristine McKenna (Oct. 13): Gus Van Sant, director of "My Own Private Idaho," has vividly and brilliantly captured the ethos of the street kids, their friends and mentors, but why does he make Mike (River Phoenix) a narcoleptic and not an addict? Van Sant obviously knows the streets and knows that drug dependency is the almost universal result of broken homes, abuse and lack of understanding--not an obscure disease. As Mike nods, the audience sees a 1-in-10,000 case and may not recognize the "everyman" of the street scene.
NEWS
October 11, 1993 | PAMELA WARRICK
"In the Dumps" is Maurice Sendak's first book in 10 years. Besides jolting folks with its social realism, the work also has invited layers upon layers of speculation about its hidden social messages. When street kids Jack and Guy take in the starving--or as one reviewer put it, "the frightfully slender"--Somalian baby, is Sendak endorsing gay adoptions? When the big, benevolent moon hands the baby down to the boys, is this the image of Christ being taken down from the cross?
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | SANDY BANKS
They begin trickling in when the doors open at noon. A sullen-looking young man with a Fu Manchu mustache and a backpack slung over his shoulder takes a sandwich and sits alone at a table. A pair of longhaired boys with baby faces argue good-naturedly over who gets first dibs on the microwave. A muscle-bound teenager with a chain around his waist nibbles at his lunch while scribbling poetry.
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