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NEWS
March 28, 1999 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of those slow days of childhood in Lavallette, N.J. Typically Michael Sherlock and his crew would be seeking dirt bike adventures involving hills, horsepower, ramps and, on one occasion, a cement wall and fractured skull. But on this day, their attention shifted to "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," which included a character called Mike Teevee--Mike because that was his name and Teevee because he spent most of his time watching television.
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NEWS
June 5, 2000
Pamela Zoolalian's idea of fun? Hurtling down a road at 60 or more miles an hour, two inches above the asphalt, supine on her luge board. Dangerous? You bet. But, Zoolalian will tell you, when it comes to living dangerously, her sport of street luge, an outgrowth of downhill skateboarding and a sort of renegade cousin to the Olympic sport of ice luge, is child's play compared with her day job as a fashion designer.
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SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flat on his back and heading straight downhill within an inch of his life, Bob Pereyra finds himself on a collision course with notoriety he only fantasized about all those years zipping over the scorched asphalt of Mulholland Highway. Too late to brake now. Street luge racing, the motorless and, some would say, mindless obsession Pereyra pioneered and tirelessly promotes, is among the featured sports at the ESPN Extreme Games, to be held Saturday through July 1 in Rhode Island.
SPORTS
April 20, 2000 | DAN ARRITT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled in the pages of the Guinness Book of World Records, between the person who set the mark for the biggest mountain-board spin and the one who has the highest jump wearing in-line skates, is Tustin resident Darren Lott's name. His claim to fame? He is the world's fastest butt boarder. Butt boarding is a style of lay-down skating that has long been preferred in Germany and Austria but only now is gaining popularity in the U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 2000
Pamela Zoolalian's idea of fun? Hurtling down a road at 60 or more miles an hour, two inches above the asphalt, supine on her luge board. Dangerous? You bet. But, Zoolalian will tell you, when it comes to living dangerously, her sport of street luge, an outgrowth of downhill skateboarding and a sort of renegade cousin to the Olympic sport of ice luge, is child's play compared with her day job as a fashion designer.
SPORTS
April 20, 2000 | DAN ARRITT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled in the pages of the Guinness Book of World Records, between the person who set the mark for the biggest mountain-board spin and the one who has the highest jump wearing in-line skates, is Tustin resident Darren Lott's name. His claim to fame? He is the world's fastest butt boarder. Butt boarding is a style of lay-down skating that has long been preferred in Germany and Austria but only now is gaining popularity in the U.S.
SPORTS
June 20, 1997 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting it in skateboard terms, George Orton's youth was as radical as it gets. Hurling himself off ramps as high as two-story buildings and regularly defying gravity's pull, Orton set world records and won world championships in skateboarding's formative years. Sixteen years ago, though, Orton gave up professional skateboarding for mostly tamer pursuits: college, family and a real job. "When you get a little older," Orton said, "you get definitely wiser."
SPORTS
June 19, 1998 | SCOTT MOE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a professional stuntman, Tom Mason knows all about crashing. But Mason also makes part of his living going downhill on an aluminum board at more than 80 mph, just an inch off the ground. The sport is street luge, one of the centerpieces of ESPN's annual X Games, starting today in San Diego, and Mason has made a name for himself for his aggressive style and spectacular crashes. And that's fine with him.
SPORTS
January 28, 1999 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the untrained eye, Tom Mason appears relatively sane. He's affable and personable, a resonant chatterbox with the smarts to own and operate a construction business. But behind an otherwise normal facade lurks someone who finds pleasure in rocketing downhill on a glorified skateboard, someone whose nom de guerre is "The Bad Boy of Street Luge." As a keen observer of the human condition once said, appearances can be misleading. Mason, 37, offers a different perspective: "It's all about image."
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | SUE CARPENTER
The X Games, ESPN's yearly sporting event for daredevils and adrenaline junkies, begins this week in San Francisco. From Friday through July 3, more than 450 people will compete in aggressive in-line skating, bicycle stunts, sky surfing, street luge, motocross, wakeboarding, sport climbing, snowboard big air and, of course, skateboarding--the original "extreme" sport that gave birth to this yearly event, and its name. Following is our primer for armchair athletes on skateboarding's basics.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of those slow days of childhood in Lavallette, N.J. Typically Michael Sherlock and his crew would be seeking dirt bike adventures involving hills, horsepower, ramps and, on one occasion, a cement wall and fractured skull. But on this day, their attention shifted to "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," which included a character called Mike Teevee--Mike because that was his name and Teevee because he spent most of his time watching television.
SPORTS
January 28, 1999 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the untrained eye, Tom Mason appears relatively sane. He's affable and personable, a resonant chatterbox with the smarts to own and operate a construction business. But behind an otherwise normal facade lurks someone who finds pleasure in rocketing downhill on a glorified skateboard, someone whose nom de guerre is "The Bad Boy of Street Luge." As a keen observer of the human condition once said, appearances can be misleading. Mason, 37, offers a different perspective: "It's all about image."
SPORTS
June 19, 1998 | SCOTT MOE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a professional stuntman, Tom Mason knows all about crashing. But Mason also makes part of his living going downhill on an aluminum board at more than 80 mph, just an inch off the ground. The sport is street luge, one of the centerpieces of ESPN's annual X Games, starting today in San Diego, and Mason has made a name for himself for his aggressive style and spectacular crashes. And that's fine with him.
SPORTS
June 20, 1997 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting it in skateboard terms, George Orton's youth was as radical as it gets. Hurling himself off ramps as high as two-story buildings and regularly defying gravity's pull, Orton set world records and won world championships in skateboarding's formative years. Sixteen years ago, though, Orton gave up professional skateboarding for mostly tamer pursuits: college, family and a real job. "When you get a little older," Orton said, "you get definitely wiser."
SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flat on his back and heading straight downhill within an inch of his life, Bob Pereyra finds himself on a collision course with notoriety he only fantasized about all those years zipping over the scorched asphalt of Mulholland Highway. Too late to brake now. Street luge racing, the motorless and, some would say, mindless obsession Pereyra pioneered and tirelessly promotes, is among the featured sports at the ESPN Extreme Games, to be held Saturday through July 1 in Rhode Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
A 35-year-old man suffered a broken leg Wednesday after losing control of a wheeled street sled and smashing into a guardrail on the mountain-road set of a car commercial. Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics were called shortly before 4:30 p.m. to Joughin Ranch on Browns Canyon Road, about four miles north of the Ronald Reagan Freeway, according to spokesman Jim Wells. An executive for the Entertainment Industry Development Corp.
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