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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you want to bring the streets of San Diego into the privacy of your own home? Imagine a flashing traffic light to lead you to your kitchen. Or a parking meter to time your teen-agers' phone conversations. And, hey, wouldn't a fire hydrant for Fido simplify everyone's lives just a little? Well, if it sounds outrageous, it's exactly what tourists and native San Diegans alike will find at the new San Diego City Store opening today in Horton Plaza.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Videos are emerging show the chaos Saturday night when spring break revelers and police clashed during the Deltopia party in Santa Barbara County. One video shows hundreds of young people running down a street as police moved in. Another video shows what appears to be tear gas smoke rising as police tried to break up the party. This video from the Daily Nexus shows police clearing the scene:   This shows another view:   One of the officers hit by flying rocks, bottles and bricks  sustained extensive injuries as he and other law enforcement personnel tried to break up the melee, authorities said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996
How many who drive have the same problem I do? You're out at night trying to find an address. On which of the four corners is the street sign? There seems to be no rule. If you finally locate a sign, it's across the street and not visible. If it's on your side of the road, it's in the dark. You'd have to get out of the car and shine a strong beam at the sign to read it! In addition, side street signs are hidden from view. In a world of technological advances beyond imagination, how come street sign identification is so archaic?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Carlos Lozano
Several sheriff's deputies were injured and about 100 people were arrested Saturday night when a spring-break party in Isla Vista in Santa Barbara County turned violent, authorities said. About 15,000 people attended Deltopia, a party near UC Santa Barbara, when a disturbance broke out about 9:30 p.m. in the 6700 block of Del Playa Drive, according to a statement from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department. The incident began when a UCSB police officer was struck in the head with a backpack containing bottles of alcohol, according to the statement.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Looking over samples of street signs in their chambers, City Council members expressed their preferences Tuesday about a purchase that is expected to cost $160,000. Councilwoman Vicki Reynolds frowned at what she called the "post-modern" look of one sign, die-cut to echo a motif of the new City Hall complex. "This isn't where we want to spend our money," she said. "What we're after is readability. And it will look dated after a few years."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dear Readers: Letters to Traffic Talk this week are from readers who want to know when they should stay on the straight and narrow, and how they can avoid wrong turns. Traffic Talk has no answer for these eternal life questions, but perhaps it can help when it comes to confusing street signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | RUSS CHARVONIA
The city of Ventura is slowly but surely replacing green street signs at major intersections with blue ones designed for easier reading. The project has been going on for the past two years and, according to Maintenance Services Supervisor John Betonte, night drivers should note a visible difference. "The new high-intensity signs are brighter and easier to read than the older engineering-grade signs we used to use," Betonte said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
When Calabasas resident Angela Knox became engaged to her longtime boyfriend, Martin Tanner, she decided to follow the tradition of finding something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue for her wedding. Then her mother, Gerta Knox, heard that the city of Calabasas was selling its old blue street signs and thought that would be the perfect gift. The Knox family has lived in the same house on Park Corona for all of Angela's 28 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997
Because the city is named in honor of the palm tree, city officials often like to display images of the tree on municipal items. The official city seal, for instance, prominently shows a regal, healthy-looking palm. But a palm logo that will go on new, illuminated street signs drew more jokes than praise at a recent City Council meeting. The new signs will have the street name at the top, with "City of La Palma" and the palm logo at the bottom of the sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Frank Garcia's announcement Saturday to his family that he was going to carve out a name for himself at an unusual Agoura Hills auction was no idle boast. The small town where he has lived for 12 years was selling off surplus city street signs. And Garcia idolized one in particular: Idle Drive. Before he left, however, he ended up buying Agoura Hills' complete inventory of 24 street signs for $150.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Carlos Lozano
At least 100 people were arrested and dozens hurt when a spring-break party dubbed Deltopia got out of hand Saturday night in Isla Vista in Santa Barbara County, authorities said. The unrest lasted for several hours as partygoers and police clashed. According to Channel 3 in Santa Barbara, authorities used tear gas, pepper spray, flash-bang grenades and foam projectiles to control the crowd. The problems were captured in photos on social media: [<a href="//storify.com/shelbygrad/violence-at-santa-barbara-s-deltopia" target="_blank">View the story "Violence at Santa Barbara's Deltopia" on Storify</a>]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Martha Groves
You won't see "Little Santa Monica" printed on street signs. But residents have long used the nickname for the mile-long stretch of road, officially known as South Santa Monica Boulevard, through the northern end of Beverly Hills' shopping district. The "Little" moniker has survived for generations as a colloquial way to differentiate the row of boutiques, eateries and office buildings from the larger, heavily traveled Santa Monica Boulevard, also known as California 2 and historic Route 66, just to the north.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Martha Groves
You won't see “Little Santa Monica” printed on street signs. But residents have long used the nickname for the mile-long stretch of road, officially known as South Santa Monica Boulevard, through the northern end of Beverly Hills' shopping district. The “Little” moniker has survived for generations as a colloquial way to differentiate the row of boutiques, eateries and office buildings from the larger, heavily traveled Santa Monica Boulevard, also known as California 2 and historic Route 66, just to the north.
HOME & GARDEN
August 31, 2013 | Robyn Brown, Brown is a freelance writer and editor in Los Angeles. She recently completed a TV pilot and young adult sci-fi romance novel
"I've waited this long for Mr. Right," my 38-year-old sister said as she leaned toward me over her albacore protein roll, the sushi restaurant buzzing with sake-soaked conversation. "I'm not going to settle for anything less than magic. " I knew the adrenaline rush she meant. In the wake of my divorce eight years ago, I'd fallen hard for a new boyfriend -- a contemporary artist who was scruffy in a way I thought very Julian Schnabel but my friends considered merely dirty -- and my life of petty arguments and lawyer phone calls suddenly seemed dusted with a dreamy shimmer of serendipity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Huntington Beach resident Michael Heh said he was in awe at the scene on Main Street late Sunday. At the front of this sea of young, alcohol-fueled humanity packed into a two-lane street of storefronts was a row of what Heh estimated to be 150 shirtless “tough guys” taunting the outnumbered police. “Just not enough at all,” Heh told The Times in an interview Monday. PHOTOS: Huntington Beach disturbance He estimated maybe 20 officers were initially downtown Sunday to deal with the aftermath of the U.S. Open of Surfing when the crowd on Main Street turned violent and broke windows and looted businesses.
WORLD
March 28, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - To grammarians' delight, local officials in southwestern England who'd considered expunging apostrophes from street signs threw out the idea Thursday and vowed to follow the rules of proper English. The proposed ban on the mild-mannered apostrophe drew criticism from throughout Britain and media attention from as far away as Australia. Proponents of good grammar lambasted the Mid Devon District Council for even thinking of killing off such a useful punctuation mark and for lowering the standards of civic discourse.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I wanna feel sunlight on my face . . . I wanna take shelter from the poison rain, where the streets have no name . . . " U2 song, "Where the Streets Have No Name" Here's how to get to Harvey Jass' house: "We just tell everyone to go down to the fourth stop sign," says Jass, "to the street with no name."
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - It was a modest proposal to ditch the humble apostrophe. Who'd've guessed it'd cause such a fuss? Not the officials in southwestern England whose idea it was to abolish the smudgy little punctuation mark from street signs. Condensing King's Crescent to Kings Crescent and turning St. Paul's Square into St. Pauls Square would help avoid "potential confusion," they said. But the proposal has stirred up a hornets' nest here in the land of the Queen's English. Unveiled this month, the suggested ban immediately sparked highly grammatical declarations of outrage and angry vows of apostrophe defense from critics throughout Britain.
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - It was a modest proposal to ditch the humble apostrophe. Who'd've guessed it'd cause such a fuss? Not the officials in southwestern England whose idea it was to abolish the smudgy little punctuation mark from street signs. Condensing King's Crescent to Kings Crescent and turning St. Paul's Square into St. Pauls Square would help avoid "potential confusion," they said. But the proposal has stirred up a hornets' nest here in the land of the Queen's English. Unveiled this month, the suggested ban immediately sparked highly grammatical declarations of outrage and angry vows of apostrophe defense from critics throughout Britain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2012 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
With the chilling pulse of the"Drive"movie soundtrack flooding their van, Calder Greenwood and his cohort sped into the shadows of the bridges overlooking the L.A. River east of downtown Los Angeles. They were on a mission to humanize the harsh industrial landscape of concrete, rusting metal, graffiti and whitewash. Their installation: A life-size papier-mache surfer. Deftly using wires and a concrete block, Greenwood placed the surfer smack in the middle of the waterway.
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