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Street Sweeping

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OPINION
May 29, 2012
Re "Swept up in parking tickets," May 24 I rented apartments for 12 years and can understand the challenge of complying with various parking restrictions related to street sweeping, but imagine how dirty our streets would be if the law wasn't enforced. And to the point that some wealthier neighborhoods don't ticket on street-sweeping days: Unfortunately, littering tends to be inversely proportional to income levels in the area. Taxing gasoline to build an incredible mass transit system so low-income people don't need cars would be part of the solution, but we aren't progressive enough to make that happen.
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NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Listen up, street-sweeping ticket haters. In another push for transparency and better use of technology in the city of Los Angeles, the Department of Transportation has begun posting each day where parking enforcement will be relaxed because the street sweepers aren't coming. This could be helpful. If you've got the foresight to check the site in the morning, you may discover that the street sweeper is skipping your route and you don't need to move your car to avoid a $73 ticket.
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NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Listen up, street-sweeping ticket haters. In another push for transparency and better use of technology in the city of Los Angeles, the Department of Transportation has begun posting each day where parking enforcement will be relaxed because the street sweepers aren't coming. This could be helpful. If you've got the foresight to check the site in the morning, you may discover that the street sweeper is skipping your route and you don't need to move your car to avoid a $73 ticket.
OPINION
May 29, 2012
Re "Swept up in parking tickets," May 24 I rented apartments for 12 years and can understand the challenge of complying with various parking restrictions related to street sweeping, but imagine how dirty our streets would be if the law wasn't enforced. And to the point that some wealthier neighborhoods don't ticket on street-sweeping days: Unfortunately, littering tends to be inversely proportional to income levels in the area. Taxing gasoline to build an incredible mass transit system so low-income people don't need cars would be part of the solution, but we aren't progressive enough to make that happen.
NEWS
December 22, 1988
The Lynwood City Council has refused a 10% annual increase to the city's street sweeping contractor but approved a 4.6% increase for 2 months. However, the council agreed to add the remaining 5.4% after the 2-month period if the contractor's work is satisfactory. The contractor, Joe's Sweeping Co. of Norwalk, was receiving $112,560 yearly and had requested a raise to $123,784. Council members said there had been complaints from residents that the streets were not being cleaned properly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
The city's street sweeping contract will be extended for another year, the City Council decided on a split vote last week. Rather than seek bids, a 3-2 council majority agreed that Sunset Property Services should get a one-year extension, with an option for another year. The council also approved sweeping city streets on a weekly basis. City Manager Robert C. Dunek said the firm's record was exemplary, adding that Sunset added new equipment to serve Lake Forest and other accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1986 | Andy Rose
City workers have begun installing igns, and notices will be mailed to residents about an impending expansion of the street-sweeping program in May. The City Council last September approved the increase, which included the purchase of 12 street sweepers, eight parking control vehicles, a dump loader truck and a pickup at a cost of about $900,000. Eight parking control police officers have also been hired. The increased cost of the program, not including the new equipment, is about $1.13 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
Starting April 6, the community district will sweep streets once, rather than twice, a month. Sweeping the streets less often will save the district about $13,000 a year, said Jim Alexander, president of the Rossmoor Community Services District Board of Directors. Stanton-based CR&R Inc. was hired to do the work for $17,200 a year. Last year, the contract cost $30,000. Curbs and gutters in front of even-numbered addresses will be cleaned the first Monday of every month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1994 | MIMI KO
About 650 residents here soon will pay less for street sweeping. But businesses will pay more. The City Council this week unanimously voted to decrease the street-sweeping rates for residents who live on privately owned streets that are not cleaned by the city to $1 a month. In addition, businesses will pay as much as $23 a month, depending on how much space they take up along city streets. Those with 300 to 500 feet of street frontage will continue to pay $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Villaraigosa is pursuing another big boost in parking ticket fines, leaving some of them 70% to 90% more expensive than the year he was elected - and several times the region's inflation rate. With the latest proposed hikes, the city would collect about $40 million a year more than during Villaraigosa's first year in office, much of it from street-sweeping violations that leave many residents fuming. The mayor's budget calls for the street-sweeping penalty to reach $78, more than in any neighboring city and, in certain cases, nearly twice the amount charged elsewhere in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Villaraigosa is pursuing another big boost in parking ticket fines, leaving some of them 70% to 90% more expensive than the year he was elected - and several times the region's inflation rate. With the latest proposed hikes, the city would collect about $40 million a year more than during Villaraigosa's first year in office, much of it from street-sweeping violations that leave many residents fuming. The mayor's budget calls for the street-sweeping penalty to reach $78, more than in any neighboring city and, in certain cases, nearly twice the amount charged elsewhere in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2002 | WENDY THERMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Law enforcement officials cracking down on illegal street racing in the San Fernando Valley arrested more than 60 people early Saturday and cited more than 90 onlookers. Six drivers were arrested on suspicion of engaging in speed contests, 57 juveniles were arrested for curfew violations and 98 people were cited on suspicion of being illegal-race spectators at a longtime "cruising" and street racing strip in Sun Valley just south of Hansen Dam, said Los Angeles police Officer Eduardo Funes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some homeowners and nurseries probably will have to restrict or eliminate their use of some common pesticides under a complex plan, released Friday, that seeks to stem the flow of 14 toxic pollutants into Newport Bay. The plan, made public by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, also might affect how often streets must be swept and compel businesses to keep contaminated water from running into storm drains in an effort to clean the bay of pesticides and metals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling a reluctance to pay more to clean urban runoff, Seal Beach property owners voted against increasing fees for more frequent street sweeping in the city, officials announced Tuesday. Voters also rejected an increase in the fee for tree-trimming service in the city. The votes were registered in a special mail-in election for property owners. Ballots were mailed to 4,855 eligible voters, and 2,544 (52.4%) responded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2001 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In yet another crackdown on illicit street racing in the San Fernando Valley, authorities arrested 32 people, mostly juveniles, and impounded 72 vehicles during a sweep in the Sylmar-Sun Valley area over the weekend. During the Illegal Street Racing Task Force, authorities also issued 86 citations, according to the Los Angeles Police Department. One person was arrested on suspicion of illegal possession of a weapon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the street sweepers finally roll into Gloria Lopez's Colonia Independencia neighborhood, she will be one happy woman. For many years--too long for the 71-year-old community leader to count--she and her neighbors in the unincorporated area near Anaheim have asked the county for street-sweeping services. But the answer was always "No."
NEWS
January 5, 1995 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A n enormous yellow City of Azusa truck sweeps through the hillside roads, re moving browning fallen leaves, plastic foam cups and other litter as the sun breaks over the mountains. What's strange about this picture? Nothing, except that the streets aren't in Azusa. They're in Sierra Madre. Every other week, the street-sweeping truck from the Azusa Public Works Department cleans streets in Sierra Madre and Duarte. The money from the contracts, in turn, helps Azusa pay for its own street sweeping every week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
Starting April 6, the community district will sweep streets once, rather than twice, a month. Sweeping the streets less often will save the district about $13,000 a year, said Jim Alexander, president of the Rossmoor Community Services District Board of Directors. Stanton-based CR&R Inc. was hired to do the work for $17,200 a year. Last year, the contract cost $30,000. Curbs and gutters in front of even-numbered addresses will be cleaned the first Monday of every month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
City streets would be swept twice a week rather than once under a proposal being studied by the city staff. Acting City Administrator Ray Silver said sending street sweepers around twice as often could cost the city as much as $200,000 a year. But, he said, that could be paid with money generated from parking citations. Officials estimate about 20,000 citations would be issued annually at $32 each.
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