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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000
Four days after he allegedly walked up to an Oxnard teenager and shot him in the face, a 15-year-old suspected gang member was charged as an adult with attempted murder and mayhem. Diego Morales could face life in prison if convicted of the Saturday shooting, the latest in a string of shootings in Oxnard that have surprised police and caused concern about the city's cresting wave of gang violence. During a brief hearing Wednesday, Judge Glen Reiser postponed Morales' arraignment until Dec.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2000
Four days after he allegedly walked up to an Oxnard teenager and shot him in the face, a 15-year-old suspected gang member was charged as an adult with attempted murder and mayhem. Diego Morales could face life in prison if convicted of the Saturday shooting, the latest in a string of shootings in Oxnard that have surprised police and caused concern about the city's cresting wave of gang violence. During a brief hearing Wednesday, Judge Glen Reiser postponed Morales' arraignment until Dec.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1989
Ramona Ripston's commentary "No Parent Is Safe From Headline Justice" (Op-Ed Page, June 21) presented a very misleading picture of the Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, the new state law which makes parents responsible for the criminal behavior of their children. The purpose of this law isn't to drag parents into the public spotlight as Ms. Ripston suggested. It isn't a forum for reckless law enforcement officials to intrude into the lives of innocent families. And the suggestion that it is just a mechanism for "Headline Justice" ignores the years of work spent to develop this law and the guidelines for its implementation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1989
Ramona Ripston's commentary "No Parent Is Safe From Headline Justice" (Op-Ed Page, June 21) presented a very misleading picture of the Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, the new state law which makes parents responsible for the criminal behavior of their children. The purpose of this law isn't to drag parents into the public spotlight as Ms. Ripston suggested. It isn't a forum for reckless law enforcement officials to intrude into the lives of innocent families. And the suggestion that it is just a mechanism for "Headline Justice" ignores the years of work spent to develop this law and the guidelines for its implementation.
NEWS
June 15, 1989
The Rowland Unified School District may step up efforts to help law enforcement officials crack down on neighborhood gangs. Supt. Sharon Robison has recommended that all campuses regularly inform police and the district attorney's office about students belonging to gangs involved in illegal activities. Robison said the information would aid enforcement of a new state law providing additional punishment for gang members. "We have all been aware of increases gang violence and drive-by shootings," Robison said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | RAMONA RIPSTON, Ramona Ripston is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California.
Being a parent in Los Angeles has become a dangerous occupation. Under the state's 1988 Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, parents run the risk of facing arrest and criminal prosecution if their child becomes a suspect in a crime. The law states that parents can be charged criminally if they are believed to have either encouraged their child's criminal activity, or if they are found to have not done enough to keep their child on the straight path. It says that parents will be held criminally accountable if they do not exercise reasonable care, but does not define in any way just what "reasonable care" is. The law is so vague and subjective that no parent is safe from its reach.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Alarmed by a sudden increase in gang violence, particularly drive-by shootings, the Police Department has assigned more officers to deal with gangs and is preparing to issue citations to gang members, warning them that they are liable for prosecution under a new state law against street terrorism. Police say Pasadena is averaging two or three drive-by shootings a week. Sixteen persons, including six innocent bystanders, have been hit by gunfire since the beginning of the year. Both Sides of Town "It's happening at both ends of town," said Lt. Wesley A. Rice, detective section administrator.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Santa Ana police will soon begin serving legal notices to street gang members that further participation in their criminal gangs could lead to a three-year prison sentence under a new state anti-terrorism law. Santa Ana will become the first city in Orange County to use the Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, which gives local law enforcement agencies and prosecutors broader powers in fighting street gangs that have a history of...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
A South Los Angeles woman pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that she failed her duties as a mother by allowing her 15-year-old son to participate in a street gang, in the first case of its kind under a new parental responsibility law. Outside the crowded Municipal Court room, Gloria Williams, 37, refused to answer questions about the charges alleging that she "failed to exercise reasonable care, supervision, protection and control" of her...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN and BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writers
Police across Los Angeles County on Thursday began serving legal notices to 3,700 reputed street gang members, warning them that membership in criminal gangs is now a felony under a new state anti-terrorism law. The novel attempt to curb gangs was announced by Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner, Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn and representatives of eight law enforcement agencies, including the Sheriff's Department and the police departments of Los Angeles, Compton, Long Beach, Montebello, Pomona, Pasadena and Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | RAMONA RIPSTON, Ramona Ripston is executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California.
Being a parent in Los Angeles has become a dangerous occupation. Under the state's 1988 Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, parents run the risk of facing arrest and criminal prosecution if their child becomes a suspect in a crime. The law states that parents can be charged criminally if they are believed to have either encouraged their child's criminal activity, or if they are found to have not done enough to keep their child on the straight path. It says that parents will be held criminally accountable if they do not exercise reasonable care, but does not define in any way just what "reasonable care" is. The law is so vague and subjective that no parent is safe from its reach.
NEWS
June 15, 1989
The Rowland Unified School District may step up efforts to help law enforcement officials crack down on neighborhood gangs. Supt. Sharon Robison has recommended that all campuses regularly inform police and the district attorney's office about students belonging to gangs involved in illegal activities. Robison said the information would aid enforcement of a new state law providing additional punishment for gang members. "We have all been aware of increases gang violence and drive-by shootings," Robison said Monday.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Santa Ana police will soon begin serving legal notices to street gang members that further participation in their criminal gangs could lead to a three-year prison sentence under a new state anti-terrorism law. Santa Ana will become the first city in Orange County to use the Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention Act, which gives local law enforcement agencies and prosecutors broader powers in fighting street gangs that have a history of...
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Alarmed by a sudden increase in gang violence, particularly drive-by shootings, the Police Department has assigned more officers to deal with gangs and is preparing to issue citations to gang members, warning them that they are liable for prosecution under a new state law against street terrorism. Police say Pasadena is averaging two or three drive-by shootings a week. Sixteen persons, including six innocent bystanders, have been hit by gunfire since the beginning of the year. Both Sides of Town "It's happening at both ends of town," said Lt. Wesley A. Rice, detective section administrator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
A South Los Angeles woman pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that she failed her duties as a mother by allowing her 15-year-old son to participate in a street gang, in the first case of its kind under a new parental responsibility law. Outside the crowded Municipal Court room, Gloria Williams, 37, refused to answer questions about the charges alleging that she "failed to exercise reasonable care, supervision, protection and control" of her...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN and BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writers
Police across Los Angeles County on Thursday began serving legal notices to 3,700 reputed street gang members, warning them that membership in criminal gangs is now a felony under a new state anti-terrorism law. The novel attempt to curb gangs was announced by Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner, Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn and representatives of eight law enforcement agencies, including the Sheriff's Department and the police departments of Los Angeles, Compton, Long Beach, Montebello, Pomona, Pasadena and Santa Monica.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
A state appeals court has struck down a controversial "Gang Mom" law that held parents responsible for the criminal activity of their children. The 2nd District Court of Appeal ruled that the 1988 law was unconstitutionally vague because it did not define "responsible parenting." The law allowed police to arrest parents for "failure to exercise reasonable care, supervision, protection and control" of their minor children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gang member Rafael Gamez, the first person in Orange County to be found guilty of attempted murder in connection with the state's street terrorism act, was sentenced Friday to more than 25 years in prison. Under the California Street Terrorism Enforcement and Prevention law, West Orange County Superior Court Judge A. Luis Cardenas added three years to a 22-year, eight-month sentence he gave to 19-year-old Gamez. The law was passed in September, 1988, in reaction to increasing gang violence.
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