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Street Vendors

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crouched on a gritty stretch of sidewalk along 6th Street with dozens of Spanish-language music cassettes at his feet, a 34-year-old street vendor named Diego spoke with a voice full of fear--fear of both the gang members who regularly shake him down, and of the police officers who had just started patrolling this weekend to protect him from the gangs. "They might be watching us right now," he said nervously of the 18th Street gang members who on most Sundays collect $10 in protection money from him, out of the roughly $40 that he takes in daily.
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OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "Legalize the street vendors," Editorial, Nov. 8 I managed the oversight and operation of the MacArthur Park vending district, L.A.'s last attempt at legal street vending. It was funded by federal grants and was supposed to become self-sufficient. It never got close. The health and safety issues that you raise are very valid. It would take just one instance of food contamination to ruin an entire program. The main problem with the MacArthur Park program was that the illegal vendors ran rings around the legal ones; you can't compete when you have to follow the rules that others don't.
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OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "Legalize the street vendors," Editorial, Nov. 8 I managed the oversight and operation of the MacArthur Park vending district, L.A.'s last attempt at legal street vending. It was funded by federal grants and was supposed to become self-sufficient. It never got close. The health and safety issues that you raise are very valid. It would take just one instance of food contamination to ruin an entire program. The main problem with the MacArthur Park program was that the illegal vendors ran rings around the legal ones; you can't compete when you have to follow the rules that others don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Los Angeles is famous for its vibrant street vending culture, with sidewalk entrepreneurs hawking everything from used clothing to bacon-wrapped hot dogs. But because the city code prohibits selling things on sidewalks, vendorsĀ  face hefty fines, confiscated equipment and even incarceration . Two members of the Los Angeles City Council would like to change that. Councilman Jose Huizar, who represents the Eastside of Los Angeles, and Councilman Curren Price, whose district takes in much of South L.A., are expected to present a motion Wednesday calling for a study of how the city can legalize street vending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000
After reading "Illegal Street Vendors Targeted in Boyle Heights" (Nov. 13), I believe the "enemy" is not the vendor "wearing a red apron, armed with kitchen knives, tortillas and a slab of beef on a spit"; the enemy is the city government that doesn't uphold local, state and federal laws. The "battle" is not a "fight against the guerrilla street vendors," the war is battling the city of Los Angeles to enforce its own laws in Boyle Heights. I am third-generation born and raised in Boyle Heights, and I continue to live and work in the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2013 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Joey Bebolla spread his wares on the sidewalk of Beach Street in Watts: some plastic aquarium plants, a few used tape players, an ancient BlackBerry. A woman walking by picked up an old toy cash register, which Bebolla had cleaned up after finding it in the trash. "Give me $2," he said. "Fine, give me $1. " The woman passed on the quick discount, and put the item down. "Selling used to be embarrassing, at first," Bebolla said. "But I had to do it to survive, and now I'm used it. " Hawking fruit at freeway offramps or old clothing on driveways and lawns is a Los Angeles tradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000
Illegal food stands in Boyle Heights have cooked up a controversy between residents who savor tacos and other Latino favorites prepared by sidewalk chefs and opponents who worry that preparing food in the open presents a public health hazard. In the middle stands Nick Pacheco, the city councilman for the East Side's 14th District.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - He was a poor man selling sausages and chicken from an unlicensed food cart in hope of earning enough money to send his talented young son to an art school in the capital. Outside a market in northeast China on a spring day, two municipal officers, members of a notoriously brutal force known as chengguan , confiscated Xia Junfeng's cooking equipment and took him in for questioning. Xia said it quickly turned into a beating. Soon, both officers were dead, stabbed with a small knife Xia kept in his pocket for slicing sausages.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Millions of Chinese took to the Internet to protest the execution of a 37-year-old vendor who had stabbed to death two municipal officials he said arrested and beat him for hawking meat skewers without a license. Xia Junfeng had argued that he was a poor, honest man who was only defending himself against the notoriously brutal urban management officers known in China as the chengguan -- and nearly 3 million Chinese agreed. As news of his execution by lethal injection was announced Wednesday, Chinese microblogs were flooded with outrage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2013 | By Matt Stevens and Kate Mather
The Venice boardwalk was quiet Monday as locals looked to restart their businesses and recover from a deadly hit-and-run rampage that shook the tight-knit residential and vendor community. Although the street vendors and homeless who spend their days at the beach say they know most of their neighbors, locals said they didn't know anything about the suspect in Saturday's rampage. Nathan Campbell, 38, was booked on suspicion of murder as the driver in Saturday's incident and is being held in lieu of $1-million bail.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Americans have been eating hot dogs since at least 1870, when a Coney Island restaurateur started selling sausages on long buns. In California's capital, hot-dog carts keep the tradition going with cheap, quick, lunches for state workers and tourists. But cart owners around the state are threatened with closure by health inspectors, unless lawmakers come to their rescue. That's why the Assembly Health Committee had to come up with a legal definition for "hot dog. " The proposed change to state health laws spells it out: "'Hot dog' means a whole, cured, cooked sausage that is skinless or stuffed in a casing that may be known as a frankfurter, frank, furter, wiener, red hot, Vienna, bologna, garlic bologna or knockwurst and that may be served in a bun or roll.
WORLD
April 21, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
GIZA, Egypt - The woman with crates of unsold tomatoes breathed in the boisterous music of slum life: creaking shutters, squawking chickens, blowing laundry, clattering junkmen. But the ingrained rhythms only angered Hamid Ali Mohamed, who sat in an alley beside her rusting scales and a slim pile of 12 coins, the equivalent of less than $2 for a day's work at the vegetable stand she inherited from her late husband. "Hey!" she yelled at a passing woman. "Why'd you buy those tomatoes from someone else?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors agreed Tuesday to explore ways to restrict illegal vending and lawn sales, a move that could give sheriff's deputies more power to seize goods and issue fines. Selling used clothes or fruit from front yards or carts on busy streets has been common in Los Angeles for years. But Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and law enforcement officials say the tradition has evolved into a problem, especially in communities around Watts, where informal flea markets have developed on some blocks . Ridley-Thomas and some residents say the illegal vendors hurt legitimate businesses, dodge sales tax laws and increase traffic in residential neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2013 | By Jason Song
Joey Bebolla spread his wares on the sidewalk of Beach Street in Watts: some plastic aquarium plants, a few used tape players, an ancient BlackBerry. A woman walks by and picks up an old toy cash register, which Bebolla had cleaned up after finding it in the trash. "Give me $2," he said. "Fine, give me $1. " The woman passed on the quick discount, and put the item down. "Selling used to be embarrassing, at first," Bebolla said. "But I had to do it to survive, and now I'm used to it. " Hawking fruit at freeway offramps or old clothing on driveways and lawns is a Los Angeles tradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2013 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Joey Bebolla spread his wares on the sidewalk of Beach Street in Watts: some plastic aquarium plants, a few used tape players, an ancient BlackBerry. A woman walking by picked up an old toy cash register, which Bebolla had cleaned up after finding it in the trash. "Give me $2," he said. "Fine, give me $1. " The woman passed on the quick discount, and put the item down. "Selling used to be embarrassing, at first," Bebolla said. "But I had to do it to survive, and now I'm used it. " Hawking fruit at freeway offramps or old clothing on driveways and lawns is a Los Angeles tradition.
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