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Street Vendors Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Nearly two dozen tenants of a Blythe Street apartment building met with a handful of administrators and instructors from Mission College on Tuesday to finalize the schedule for an entrepreneurial training program designed to make their work safer and more profitable. Most of the tenants who gathered on folding chairs in the building's cramped common room are immigrants from Puebla, Mexico, who sell cooked corn from street carts for a living.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | TIM MAY
After organizing themselves and graduating from a culinary training program at Mission College, immigrant street vendors from the San Fernando Valley hoped to obtain city permits that would allow them to legally sell their tamales, helados and other food items. That was in March. Nine months later, street vending is still illegal and the vendors--many of whom rely on vending as their sole source of income--remain subject to tickets of up to $130 from police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995
It took a while, but feuding street vendors in Pico-Union and Boyle Heights are finally getting their fruit baskets in order. An agreement late last month between two factions of unlicensed vendors settled much of a nearly yearlong dispute over money, office supplies and documents belonging to the Asociacion de Vendedores Ambulantes, or AVA. Now there will be two groups. AVA will live on with members of the Boyle Heights faction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995
It took a while, but feuding street vendors in Pico-Union and Boyle Heights are finally getting their fruit baskets in order. An agreement late last month between two factions of unlicensed vendors settled much of a nearly yearlong dispute over money, office supplies and documents belonging to the Asociacion de Vendedores Ambulantes, or AVA. Now there will be two groups. AVA will live on with members of the Boyle Heights faction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1995 | TIM MAY
After organizing themselves and graduating from a culinary training program at Mission College, immigrant street vendors from the San Fernando Valley hoped to obtain city permits that would allow them to legally sell their tamales, helados and other food items. That was in March. Nine months later, street vending is still illegal and the vendors--many of whom rely on vending as their sole source of income--remain subject to tickets of up to $130 from police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
You might call it a flower fracas or a watermelon war. Whatever the name, Sylmar merchants are convinced their suburban enclave is being invaded by peddlers hawking everything from flowers to produce. Mostly it's flowers that are getting florists' dander up, even though they admit that lately the petal-bearing offenders have been lying low. In fact, police say there is no cause for alarm. "This is not a new concern," said Capt. James T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1995
Javier Rodriguez H. ("Not a single Vendor has a License" Nov. 18) may be correct when he asserts that illegal street vendors represent "a socioeconomic phenomenon no different than what is found in Mexico City or any other megalopolis in Latin America." But let me assert that the last thing Los Angeles needs is to become any more like a Third World city than it already has.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As City Hall prepares again to grapple with the thorny issue of legalizing street vendors, Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon finds himself in the eye of a storm. His own Valley-based district is 70% Latino and many of his constituents patronize the growing number of vendors in Pacoima, Van Nuys, Panorama City and Sylmar. But homeowners and business people in his district, many of whom supported his successful election effort, see vending as a harbinger of urban decay.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1995 | JAVIER RODRIGUEZ H., Javier Rodriguez H. is a writer and an advisor to the Street Vendors Assn. in East Los Angeles
Street vendors, like day laborers, pirate taxi drivers, long distance raiteros (passenger carriers) and barrio house kitchens are part of the informal economy that has grown in Los Angeles because of unemployment and large-scale immigration. It is a socioeconomic phenomenon no different than what is found in Mexico City or any other megalopolis in Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1993 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing a need for better enforcement, the Burbank City Council has ordered a plan drafted that would allow authorities to seize the pushcarts of street vendors who violate a ban passed earlier this year. The council also decided to target large distributors who supply street vendors with the tools of their trade: pushcarts, ice cream and other products. "The focus of this is not the poor guy trying to make a living," said Burbank Police Chief David P. Newsham.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
You might call it a flower fracas or a watermelon war. Whatever the name, Sylmar merchants are convinced their suburban enclave is being invaded by peddlers hawking everything from flowers to produce. Mostly it's flowers that are getting florists' dander up, even though they admit that lately the petal-bearing offenders have been lying low. In fact, police say there is no cause for alarm. "This is not a new concern," said Capt. James T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Nearly two dozen tenants of a Blythe Street apartment building met with a handful of administrators and instructors from Mission College on Tuesday to finalize the schedule for an entrepreneurial training program designed to make their work safer and more profitable. Most of the tenants who gathered on folding chairs in the building's cramped common room are immigrants from Puebla, Mexico, who sell cooked corn from street carts for a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles city task force has recommended sweeping changes in laws governing street vendors, including the creation of special vending districts where hundreds of Latino immigrants and others can legally peddle their wares. The report, more than a year in the making, is the first comprehensive look at street vending in the city. It estimates that there are at least 2,000 vendors operating illegally in Los Angeles, mostly in downtown, East Los Angeles, Hollywood and Venice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1994 | Compiled for The Times by Kevin Baxter
Street vendors in Los Angeles won a major victory in January when the City Council voted to legalize the sidewalk entrepreneurs in designated districts. But the victory has proven bittersweet. Six months after the council vote, not one district has been established and no permits have been issued. In the meantime, vendors claim police are cracking down on them. The issue came to a head last Tuesday with a protest in front of LAPD headquarters in Downtown Los Angeles. Sgt.
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