Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStreetlights
IN THE NEWS

Streetlights

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1996
We who grow weary every time we watch the news are heartened to learn that some gang members are getting a chance to change ("Can Hollywood Save Crazy Ace?" by Celeste Fremon, Oct. 6). I commend the Streetlights people for the positive impact they've had on many young lives, and I wish Robert "Crazy Ace" Leon the best of luck. April Henderson Huntington Beach My hat is off to Dorothy Balsis Thompson and others who've had the guts to offer gainful employment to these tough young adults.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
An upside-down American flag is considered a signal of distress. And that's the feeling Robert Rosebrock had when he looked up and noticed the red, white and blue street-lamp banners outside the Department of Veterans Affairs' West Los Angeles Medical Center were in disarray - tattered, tangled around the poles or flapping upside-down in the breeze. "It was disgraceful," said Rosebrock, a 71-year-old U.S. Army veteran who arranged for the flags' installation 11 months ago using $12,000 donated by Metabolic Studio, a charitable arm of the Annenberg Foundation.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
November 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The hit-and-run death of a 10-year-old boy on a darkened street last week prompted officials in Des Moines to reverse a decision that turned off nearly one in five streetlights to save money. "It's a safety issue," Mayor Frank Cownie said. By turning off 4,200 of its 23,543 streetlights, the city estimated it would save about $700,000 annually. To pay for keeping the lights on, officials said they would increase property taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Most talk glowingly about their neighborhoods' new nighttime look. But some residents are taking a dim view of bright new streetlights that are popping up across Los Angeles. Energy-saving light-emitting diode fixtures are being placed on 140,000 of the city's roadside light poles in a retrofitting that engineers say will cut power usage by at least 40% and eventually save taxpayers an estimated $10 million a year. Besides being cheaper to operate, the new LED lamps shine a whiter, wider and more even splash of light across residential streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' first civic-sponsored New Year's Eve in 1919 -- an all-night party to celebrate the new electric streetlights along Broadway -- was ushered in no sooner than Jan. 17, 1920. Turns out the elaborate lights couldn't be turned on by Dec. 31 because city workers were behind schedule. Yet the much-delayed, all-day-all-night carnival inspired more than 30 more years of big New Year's Eve parties along a stretch of downtown's Broadway, a tradition that died in the 1950s when L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Most talk glowingly about their neighborhoods' new nighttime look. But some residents are taking a dim view of bright new streetlights that are popping up across Los Angeles. Energy-saving light-emitting diode fixtures are being placed on 140,000 of the city's roadside light poles in a retrofitting that engineers say will cut power usage by at least 40% and eventually save taxpayers an estimated $10 million a year. Besides being cheaper to operate, the new LED lamps shine a whiter, wider and more even splash of light across residential streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2009 | Maeve Reston
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who served as national co-chairman of Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential campaign, is scheduled to appear today at City Hall with former President Clinton to announce a five-year project with the Clinton Climate Initiative to make the city's streetlights more energy-efficient. The mayor's office said the plan to swap out all 140,000 of L.A.'s residential streetlights with more energy-efficient LED lights would be the largest program of its kind undertaken by a city.
OPINION
July 19, 2008
Re "Power-starved Iraq goes solar," July 14 Oh, if only the U.S. had thought it worthy to use solar in our own country instead of going to war in Iraq to secure our oil interests there. And how ironic that in oil-rich Iraq there is not enough energy to power that country's streetlights, so it has to turn to solar. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Dorko is incorrect when he says the $6 million it would cost to build a one-megawatt solar plant is prohibitive: The United States spends more than that every hour to sustain its war there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you want to bring the streets of San Diego into the privacy of your own home? Imagine a flashing traffic light to lead you to your kitchen. Or a parking meter to time your teen-agers' phone conversations. And, hey, wouldn't a fire hydrant for Fido simplify everyone's lives just a little? Well, if it sounds outrageous, it's exactly what tourists and native San Diegans alike will find at the new San Diego City Store opening today in Horton Plaza.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Thieves have disabled about 700 streetlights in Los Angeles, making off with 370,000 feet of valuable copper wiring over the last four months. L.A. officials said it is a twist on copper thefts that have plagued new home sites and even some office buildings in the last few years. With some lights pilfered during the summer still out, city officials Tuesday expressed concerns about the safety of passing drivers, pedestrians and bikers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2009 | Maeve Reston
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who served as national co-chairman of Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential campaign, is scheduled to appear today at City Hall with former President Clinton to announce a five-year project with the Clinton Climate Initiative to make the city's streetlights more energy-efficient. The mayor's office said the plan to swap out all 140,000 of L.A.'s residential streetlights with more energy-efficient LED lights would be the largest program of its kind undertaken by a city.
OPINION
July 19, 2008
Re "Power-starved Iraq goes solar," July 14 Oh, if only the U.S. had thought it worthy to use solar in our own country instead of going to war in Iraq to secure our oil interests there. And how ironic that in oil-rich Iraq there is not enough energy to power that country's streetlights, so it has to turn to solar. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Dorko is incorrect when he says the $6 million it would cost to build a one-megawatt solar plant is prohibitive: The United States spends more than that every hour to sustain its war there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Thieves have disabled about 700 streetlights in Los Angeles, making off with 370,000 feet of valuable copper wiring over the last four months. L.A. officials said it is a twist on copper thefts that have plagued new home sites and even some office buildings in the last few years. With some lights pilfered during the summer still out, city officials Tuesday expressed concerns about the safety of passing drivers, pedestrians and bikers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles' first civic-sponsored New Year's Eve in 1919 -- an all-night party to celebrate the new electric streetlights along Broadway -- was ushered in no sooner than Jan. 17, 1920. Turns out the elaborate lights couldn't be turned on by Dec. 31 because city workers were behind schedule. Yet the much-delayed, all-day-all-night carnival inspired more than 30 more years of big New Year's Eve parties along a stretch of downtown's Broadway, a tradition that died in the 1950s when L.A.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2005 | Nicole Gaouette, Times Staff Writer
A super-sized balloon sponsored by M&M veered out of control at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York on Thursday, injuring two people and raising questions about the safety procedures governing the annual spectacle. One of the balloon's ropes clipped the head of a streetlamp off its pole, sending it crashing down to the crowd below.
OPINION
October 30, 2005 | DANIEL OKAMURA
Gangster's Paradise Urban parks provide an unsafe haven for street gangs in "Mi Vida Loca," Allison Anders' 1993 portrayal of Chicana posse life, which was shot on location in Echo Park. New York's Central Park hosts a midnight melee in "The Warriors" (1979), when the namesake gang battles the Baseball Furies in samurai swordplay using wooden bats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
With daylight savings time ending Sunday, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Bureau of Street Lighting is urging residents to report faulty streetlights. Calls about equipment needing repair or replacement may be placed to (800) 342-5397 or (213) 847-5368.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1993
Your June 6 article about the new street lighting system hits home. On Dec. 30, several residents of Encino wrote to our councilman to complain about the reduction in street lighting. The city has spent (and charged the residents) more than $300,000 to convert the lighting system that was originally purchased and paid for by the developers of the residents' homes. The conversion has robbed us of a level of nighttime safety that was present before this expenditure. We are told that low-pressure sodium actually provides more light than the mercury vapor lights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2005 | David Pierson, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood Boulevard, that aging starlet, is getting another face-lift. And right now, they're doing the eyes. Workers are busily pulling down the distinctive boxy street lamps adorned with five stars that have welcomed visitors to the boulevard since the 1960s. Sure, the lamps are famous enough to have adorned postcards. But to many in Hollywood, they are just an unpleasant reminder of Hollywood Boulevard's sad old days of decline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2005 | Erica Williams, Times Staff Writer
Along Vermont Avenue west of downtown, the streetscape is marked by that familiar Los Angeles mix of mini-malls, low-rise office buildings and aging Art Deco storefronts. But head north of 3rd Street and the chaotic commerce of Vermont suddenly takes on an unexpected order. A striking difference is new streetlights that look old-fashioned.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|