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NEWS
May 26, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those with connections, declares Dorothy Thompson, get the jobs. Organizations with connections get grants. And while she has become a connection for the trainees who have gone on to establish careers as production assistants, she worries that she can't get the funding needed for the survival of Streetlights, the program she started two years ago that trains troubled young people for entry-level jobs in the entertainment industry.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city begins a five-phase streetlight replacement project today along the western end of Ventura Boulevard, said a spokesman for the Los Angeles Department of Public Works. The $1.35-million project, stretching from Corbin Avenue to Valley Circle Boulevard in Woodland Hills, will take the Bureau of Street Lighting five years to complete, said public works spokesman Robert Reed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Earlier this summer, thieves in Pico Rivera made off with a 200-pound brass bell from a Catholic church. Burglars around California have torn up train tracks, carted off bleachers, nabbed park statues and helped themselves to copper wiring serving neighborhoods, hospitals and airports. The state is in the throes of a metal theft epidemic, fueled by scrap yards' willingness to pay high prices for copper and steel that can be resold to hungry factories in Asia. In Southern California, a proliferation of unpermitted scrap yards - which have set up shop here to take advantage of access to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach - has exacerbated the problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2009 | Corina Knoll
The bodies of two men believed to have been electrocuted while stealing copper wiring were found early Tuesday on an abandoned driving range in Riverside County, authorities said. San Jacinto police and county firefighters received a report of fireworks in the 900 block of Idyllwild Drive about 1:20 a.m., but instead discovered a fire near a transformer, said Deputy Herlinda Valenzuela of the Riverside County Sheriff's Department.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2009 | Martha Groves
If you're suddenly having trouble finding a neighborhood mailbox, you've got lots of company. In recent weeks, one-quarter of the 3,700 collection boxes in the Los Angeles area have been removed, said Joseph L. Harrison, a spokesman for the U.S. Postal Service's Los Angeles district.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1996
The age-old question "Am I my brother's keeper?" was eloquently answered in Celeste Fremon's insightful article ("Can Hollywood Save Crazy Ace?" Oct. 6). I worked teaching classes within the prison system for several years before such programs were dismantled by the government. I came to know many young men who sincerely wanted to change their lives but needed help in order to do so. The trend away from rehabilitative programs in the prisons is a step in the wrong direction. Let Robert (Crazy Ace)
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Edison Co. is taking a first step toward supporting municipal wireless Internet networks after holding up such projects in cities throughout the region for more than 18 months. The state's second-largest power utility has agreed to let EarthLink Inc. build a small network using Edison streetlights in Santa Ana as part of a wider-ranging trial of wireless gear. "This is long overdue," said Esme Vos of MuniWireless.com, an authority on such high-speed wireless projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2011 | Ann M. Simmons
Outfitted in his trademark cowboy hat and long black overcoat, Lloyd Wilkins took a stroll down West Bennett Street in Compton on a recent weekday morning, engaging residents along the way. "Hey, man, she's a beauty," Wilkins said as horse trainer Ricardo De La Torre approached atop a pristinely groomed quarter horse. A short time later two other riders sauntered by, greeting Wilkins with a wave. "This is what I'm talking about," Wilkins said, gesturing toward the equestrians.
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