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Streetlights

BUSINESS
March 5, 2006 | Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writer
Thomas Kinkade is famous for his luminous landscapes and street scenes, those dreamy, deliberately inspirational images he says have brought "God's light" into people's lives, even as they have made him one of America's most collected artists. A devout Christian who calls himself the "Painter of Light," Kinkade trades heavily on his beliefs and says God has guided his brush -- and his life -- for the last 20 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
High scrap-metal prices led criminals to steal copper wire from about 750 streetlights, costing the city nearly $250,000, officials said. Copper sells for about $3 to $4 a pound, said Dave Row, a supervisor with the Public Works Department. The amount of copper stolen between two streetlights can weigh between 60 and 80 pounds. Workers will retool electrical boxes on the lights with special locks and screws. Officers are following up on leads provided by scrap-metal business owners, Police Capt.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those with connections, declares Dorothy Thompson, get the jobs. Organizations with connections get grants. And while she has become a connection for the trainees who have gone on to establish careers as production assistants, she worries that she can't get the funding needed for the survival of Streetlights, the program she started two years ago that trains troubled young people for entry-level jobs in the entertainment industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city begins a five-phase streetlight replacement project today along the western end of Ventura Boulevard, said a spokesman for the Los Angeles Department of Public Works. The $1.35-million project, stretching from Corbin Avenue to Valley Circle Boulevard in Woodland Hills, will take the Bureau of Street Lighting five years to complete, said public works spokesman Robert Reed.
OPINION
July 24, 2013 | By Michelle Wilde Anderson
Though it is the biggest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy, Detroit is only one of 26 urban municipalities that have gone into bankruptcy or state receivership for fiscal insolvency since 2008. Detroit should draw attention and debate to a challenging issue underlying all these public insolvencies: What level of public services will we protect and guarantee for U.S. cities? The Bankruptcy Court will have to face that question. It will have to determine whether Detroit can cut into current services any more than it already has. Unless the state or federal government steps in with funds for operating costs, the bankruptcy will function as a zero-sum game, with residents fighting creditors for a share of city revenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2009 | Corina Knoll
The bodies of two men believed to have been electrocuted while stealing copper wiring were found early Tuesday on an abandoned driving range in Riverside County, authorities said. San Jacinto police and county firefighters received a report of fireworks in the 900 block of Idyllwild Drive about 1:20 a.m., but instead discovered a fire near a transformer, said Deputy Herlinda Valenzuela of the Riverside County Sheriff's Department.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Earlier this summer, thieves in Pico Rivera made off with a 200-pound brass bell from a Catholic church. Burglars around California have torn up train tracks, carted off bleachers, nabbed park statues and helped themselves to copper wiring serving neighborhoods, hospitals and airports. The state is in the throes of a metal theft epidemic, fueled by scrap yards' willingness to pay high prices for copper and steel that can be resold to hungry factories in Asia. In Southern California, a proliferation of unpermitted scrap yards - which have set up shop here to take advantage of access to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach - has exacerbated the problem.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Edison Co. is taking a first step toward supporting municipal wireless Internet networks after holding up such projects in cities throughout the region for more than 18 months. The state's second-largest power utility has agreed to let EarthLink Inc. build a small network using Edison streetlights in Santa Ana as part of a wider-ranging trial of wireless gear. "This is long overdue," said Esme Vos of MuniWireless.com, an authority on such high-speed wireless projects.
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