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Streetlights

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | Hailey Branson-Potts
The problems in La Habra Heights started with llama poop. Phil and Aida Lough were so convinced their eco-friendly fertilizer - Llama Brew - was their ticket to success that they tried to entice investors on ABC's reality show, "The Shark Tank. " The investors weren't impressed and neither were La Habra Heights city officials, who sued the Loughs, saying that their animals and huge, open drums of animal waste at their home were a stinky, unsanitary mess. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge agreed and ordered the Loughs to stop producing Llama Brew.
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NEWS
May 26, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those with connections, declares Dorothy Thompson, get the jobs. Organizations with connections get grants. And while she has become a connection for the trainees who have gone on to establish careers as production assistants, she worries that she can't get the funding needed for the survival of Streetlights, the program she started two years ago that trains troubled young people for entry-level jobs in the entertainment industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Penny Puckett came to Slab City and fell in love. After four years of "bumming around and hopping freight trains," the 25-year-old from Kansas City arrived at this hardscrabble section of the Imperial Valley desert and immediately embraced its sense of liberation from society's rules and norms. What others might view as desolation and deprivation, Puckett saw as a way to reduce life to its essence: water, food and shelter (plus Internet and cellular phone service). PHOTOS: Slab City "Slab City people have a great need to live with just the bare necessities and are happy about it," she said.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city begins a five-phase streetlight replacement project today along the western end of Ventura Boulevard, said a spokesman for the Los Angeles Department of Public Works. The $1.35-million project, stretching from Corbin Avenue to Valley Circle Boulevard in Woodland Hills, will take the Bureau of Street Lighting five years to complete, said public works spokesman Robert Reed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2011 | Ann M. Simmons
Outfitted in his trademark cowboy hat and long black overcoat, Lloyd Wilkins took a stroll down West Bennett Street in Compton on a recent weekday morning, engaging residents along the way. "Hey, man, she's a beauty," Wilkins said as horse trainer Ricardo De La Torre approached atop a pristinely groomed quarter horse. A short time later two other riders sauntered by, greeting Wilkins with a wave. "This is what I'm talking about," Wilkins said, gesturing toward the equestrians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Earlier this summer, thieves in Pico Rivera made off with a 200-pound brass bell from a Catholic church. Burglars around California have torn up train tracks, carted off bleachers, nabbed park statues and helped themselves to copper wiring serving neighborhoods, hospitals and airports. The state is in the throes of a metal theft epidemic, fueled by scrap yards' willingness to pay high prices for copper and steel that can be resold to hungry factories in Asia. In Southern California, a proliferation of unpermitted scrap yards - which have set up shop here to take advantage of access to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach - has exacerbated the problem.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Edison Co. is taking a first step toward supporting municipal wireless Internet networks after holding up such projects in cities throughout the region for more than 18 months. The state's second-largest power utility has agreed to let EarthLink Inc. build a small network using Edison streetlights in Santa Ana as part of a wider-ranging trial of wireless gear. "This is long overdue," said Esme Vos of MuniWireless.com, an authority on such high-speed wireless projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Contradictions fly along Hyperion Avenue when the Birdman of Silver Lake takes wing. Rik Martino rolls his wobbly cart with two mismatched wheels to the corner of Tracy Street and stops at Baller Hardware to buy two 20-pound bags of True Value Wild Bird Food. More than 30 years after arriving from his native Italy, the 58-year-old actor is still looking for his big-screen break. Square-jawed and body-builder muscular, Martino views himself as more Al Pacino than Jean-Claude Van Damme.
OPINION
July 17, 2011 | By Joan Springhetti
Eight years ago, as I watched a building near my work be converted from vacant offices into lofts, I couldn't stop thinking about it. If I lived there, in that beautiful old building, I could walk less than a block to work. That micro-distance was important: Any farther and I wouldn't have felt safe walking home after dark. There were no streetlights on the block back then. Homeless people curled up in doorways and under cardboard boxes. On the sidewalk was a row of public outhouses, which I soon realized were "owned" by drug dealers.
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