Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStreetlights
IN THE NEWS

Streetlights

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Penny Puckett came to Slab City and fell in love. After four years of "bumming around and hopping freight trains," the 25-year-old from Kansas City arrived at this hardscrabble section of the Imperial Valley desert and immediately embraced its sense of liberation from society's rules and norms. What others might view as desolation and deprivation, Puckett saw as a way to reduce life to its essence: water, food and shelter (plus Internet and cellular phone service). PHOTOS: Slab City "Slab City people have a great need to live with just the bare necessities and are happy about it," she said.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Those with connections, declares Dorothy Thompson, get the jobs. Organizations with connections get grants. And while she has become a connection for the trainees who have gone on to establish careers as production assistants, she worries that she can't get the funding needed for the survival of Streetlights, the program she started two years ago that trains troubled young people for entry-level jobs in the entertainment industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
GROVELAND, Calif. - As autumn turns to winter and rain falls over the charred landscape left behind by the Rim fire, forest rangers and emergency planners have a new worry: water. Over 90% of the blaze burned in the Tuolumne River watershed, where more than 2,600 miles of streams cut through steep, now-burned slopes of the Sierra Nevada. Those mountains are primed for flooding and debris flows in a big storm. The 410-square-mile blaze - California's third-largest on record - ignited on Aug. 17 in the Stanislaus National Forest and burned into the northwest part of Yosemite National Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city begins a five-phase streetlight replacement project today along the western end of Ventura Boulevard, said a spokesman for the Los Angeles Department of Public Works. The $1.35-million project, stretching from Corbin Avenue to Valley Circle Boulevard in Woodland Hills, will take the Bureau of Street Lighting five years to complete, said public works spokesman Robert Reed.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
With devastating images still coming from Japan following the earthquakes and tsunamis, earthquake safety and preparedness is on the top of Californians' minds. Although we may think we know what to do in the event of a strong quake, we may not be thinking clearly when the earth starts to shake. Here's what to do--and what not to do--in the event of an earthquake: If you're indoors, the American Red Cross advises you to drop, cover and hold on. Duck under a sturdy table or desk and hold onto a leg in case the table moves.
NATIONAL
December 2, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - In a sprawling complex of laboratories and futuristic gadgets in Golden, Colo., a supercomputer named Peregrine does a quadrillion calculations per second to help scientists figure out how to keep the lights on. Peregrine was turned on this year by the U.S. Energy Department. It has the world's largest "petascale" computing capability. It is the size of a Mack truck. Its job is to figure out how to cope with a risk from something the public generally thinks of as benign - renewable energy.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2006 | Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writer
Thomas Kinkade is famous for his luminous landscapes and street scenes, those dreamy, deliberately inspirational images he says have brought "God's light" into people's lives, even as they have made him one of America's most collected artists. A devout Christian who calls himself the "Painter of Light," Kinkade trades heavily on his beliefs and says God has guided his brush -- and his life -- for the last 20 years.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Southern California Edison Co. is taking a first step toward supporting municipal wireless Internet networks after holding up such projects in cities throughout the region for more than 18 months. The state's second-largest power utility has agreed to let EarthLink Inc. build a small network using Edison streetlights in Santa Ana as part of a wider-ranging trial of wireless gear. "This is long overdue," said Esme Vos of MuniWireless.com, an authority on such high-speed wireless projects.
MAGAZINE
August 24, 2003 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer who regularly covers gangs and the police.
When tragedy occurs, those who are most drastically affected often find themselves searching for the exact point at which another path could have been taken, as if by doing so, fate can be rewound and played again, this time without a devastating ending. Robert Leon has imagined a million times what he could have, should have done on the night that shattered his own and another's life.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1996
The age-old question "Am I my brother's keeper?" was eloquently answered in Celeste Fremon's insightful article ("Can Hollywood Save Crazy Ace?" Oct. 6). I worked teaching classes within the prison system for several years before such programs were dismantled by the government. I came to know many young men who sincerely wanted to change their lives but needed help in order to do so. The trend away from rehabilitative programs in the prisons is a step in the wrong direction. Let Robert (Crazy Ace)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|