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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Veronica Rocha
A 53-year-old male transient from Santa Monica was arrested Thursday and booked on suspicion of attempted murder in connection with the stabbing of a woman on a busy street in Glendale, police said. Michael Caudill is being held in lieu of $1-million bail, Glendale police Sgt. Tom Lorenz said. The woman, who hasn't been identified by police, suffered a non-life-threatening stab wound to her upper torso and was taken to a hospital for treatment, he said. Police received numerous 911 calls from witnesses about the stabbing just before 10:30 a.m. at San Fernando Road and Pacific Avenue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The idea seemed crazy at first: More than 500 knitters from 25 countries, hunkered down in their far-flung corners of the world, feverishly crafting granny squares - 14,000 of them altogether. Then, on a bright morning last May, knitters here affixed metal grids of these cushy yarn squares to the exterior of the Craft & Folk Art Museum on Wilshire Boulevard, turning the building into a giant, multicolored tea cozy. The 2013 project, "CAFAM Granny Squared," was an urban installation from the knit graffiti collective Yarn Bombing Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By David Zahniser
One year after Los Angeles voters rejected a sales tax increase, the City Council is looking at trying again - this time by tying the money to the repair of the city's deteriorating network of streets. Two high-level City Hall policy advisors recommended Tuesday that lawmakers place a half-cent tax hike on the November ballot that would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years. The proceeds, they said, would pay to fix the most severely damaged roads and sidewalks. Passage of a tax could add momentum to Mayor Eric Garcetti's "back to basics" campaign, which focuses on upgrading basic services.
OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By Mollie Lowery
Lourdes was 69 years old when I first met her in 2012. She was living next to a bus stop on a busy four-lane street in front of a Silver Lake supermarket. Lourdes had claimed the spot three years earlier, after she was rousted from her encampment in Griffith Park. Before that, she'd lived in her 1973 Toyota, but it was eventually impounded because of overdue parking tickets. Lourdes was one of the folks we call "chronically homeless. " She'd been surviving on the city's margins for 20 years after losing her low-cost housing because of gentrification.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | The Times editorial board
City government is not necessarily known for its willingness to try new things or move quickly, or its flexibility in issuing permits. Activists and businesses often complain that attempts to beautify their communities get tied up in red tape. But a program from the Los Angeles Department of Transportation offers hope of a new ethos emerging in City Hall, one that empowers neighborhoods and city agencies to experiment with urban design. The program, called "People St," invites community groups to apply for the right to convert a piece of city street into a plaza, a parklet or bike parking for one year.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
If Leonardo DiCaprio needs to take a breather after his hard-fought Oscar battle, he can retreat to the Palm Springs estate he recently bought for $5.23 million. Set on 1.3 acres in the Old Las Palmas neighborhood, the renovated 1963 estate designed by architect Donald Wexler was once owned by Dinah Shore , the big band-era singer, television show host and avid golfer who died in 1994. The 7,022-square-foot Modernist showplace has floor-to-ceiling glass walls, wooden ceilings, a massive stone fireplace and a sunken bar in the living room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By David Zahniser
Nearly a decade ago, Enrique Ramirez welcomed the opening of a light-rail station in Little Tokyo, just a quick walk from his Mexican seafood restaurant. The Metro Gold Line station delivered a steady stream of customers to Senor Fish, especially on weekends. But now, with the region's rail system expanding again, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is pushing him out. On Saturday, Senor Fish abandoned its location at the corner of 1st and Alameda streets. And later this year, Metro is set to demolish the property's two brick buildings, which are located across the street from the Japanese American National Museum and have played an important role in the cultural life of the neighborhood for decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Summer Dreams" (CBS, Saturday). A vivid, elegantly made, two-hour documentary centering on the NBA Summer League, a 10-day yearly event, held in Orlando, Fla., and Las Vegas, where pro-ball hopefuls and rookies run and dribble, pass and shoot before a worldwide array of coaches and executives -- a kind of last-chance marketplace for some, and a pre-season workout for contracted others. ("The 'American Idol' of basketball," Dallas Mavericks General Manager Donnie Nelson calls it. "It's a little stepping stool, man," says undrafted outsider Dwayne Davis.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Street closures in downtown Los Angeles for the public funeral for an LAPD officer who was killed last week in a Beverly Hills crash was slowing the morning work commute. The funeral for Officer Nicholas Lee, a 16-year department veteran, was scheduled to start at 9 a.m. at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels , after which, a  procession will end at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, where Lee will be interred. To accommodate the funeral, officials closed Hill Street between Ord and 1st streets, Temple Street between Grand Avenue and Broadway, and the northbound side of Grand between 1st and Temple - slowing the morning work commute through downtown after they took effect at 6:30 a.m. PHOTOS: Fatal collision in Beverly Hills California Gov. Jerry Brown is scheduled to attend the service, his office announced Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Susan King
Director Roger Michell and writer Hanif Kureishi were on a worldwide promotional tour for "Venus," the 2006 film that earned Peter O'Toole his last Oscar nomination, when the two collaborators' seemingly nonstop travel schedule hatched the concept for a new film. "We had lots of airplane flights and came up with this idea of a couple going to Paris for 48 hours as a very easy and beautiful structure," Michell said. He and Kureishi decided to take their own 48-hour trip to Paris to outline the characters and the plot.
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