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Streisand Center For Conservancy Studies

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A candidate seemingly chosen before the job was advertised has been named academic director of the new Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies, winning out over more than 100 other applicants for the $70,000-a-year post. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a state parks agency, has given the job of running the environmental research and conference center to Madelyn J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A candidate seemingly chosen before the job was advertised has been named academic director of the new Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies, winning out over more than 100 other applicants for the $70,000-a-year post. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a state parks agency, has given the job of running the environmental research and conference center to Madelyn J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1995
Seldom does an article satisfy one's sense of irony as your June 19 piece on the Barbra Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies. It seems the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy has been thwarted in its plans for the place by the state Coastal Commission, darling of environmentalists, which has refused to issue a permit. Maybe now the tree-huggers will understand how property owners feel when denied the right to use their own property by the Coastal Commission's phalanx of busybodies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1996
Officials with the Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies have applied for status as a nonprofit organization to help the conservancy qualify for grants to pay for programs and activities run by the financially strapped group. Most of the grant money would fund a series of environmental education programs on the 22-acre property, which sits atop Ramirez Canyon in Malibu, said Lisa Soghor, program coordinator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1998
A group of homeowners has sued the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, saying that the state agency has no business using a residential road to bring guests and catering vans to its facilities. In a complaint filed in Santa Monica Superior Court, about 30 property owners in Ramirez Canyon say that they want a halt to what they say is noisy and dangerous commercial use of a residential road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1993
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy--and indeed, all in this region who love the outdoors--received a gift before the holiday season even began. Entertainer Barbra Streisand has donated her 24-acre Malibu estate to the conservancy, the state agency charged with acquiring public parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains and promoting environmental education. The property, which includes five houses, has been valued by state appraisers at $15 million.
NEWS
June 20, 2000
Banning Residence Museum in Wilmington needs volunteers to be trained as docents. Participants will study the history, economy, politics, architecture and decorative arts of the 19th century Greek Revival period. Volunteers are also needed in the museum shop, to assist with special events and to perform clerical tasks in the office. Information: Volunteer Center, South Bay-Harbor-Long Beach, (310) 212-5009.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new Barbra Streisand Center for Conservancy Studies in Malibu is drawing fire from nearby Ramirez Canyon residents who are enraged over plans to use the 24-acre estate for events that may have nothing to do with conservancy. "The property is going to be used for commercial purposes, a catering facility, to support it," said Mindy Shep, an attorney and seven-year canyon resident.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1996 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Barbra Streisand moved to a remote Malibu canyon in 1974, like any new home owner she made a few improvements. She planted more than 1,000 trees, adding to the huge, sprawling sycamores already there. She rerouted a creek, which made way for a grassy meadow. For an entire year, she employed a crew of 30 to 50 stone masons who laid fancy brick walkways and built stone walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1995 | JANE SPILLER
Pasadena is famous for many reasons, among them its urban forest. "There are about 52,000 street trees, valued at $75 million," says John Alderson, the city's park and forestry administrator who oversaw a computer inventory of these leafy assets. The city nurtures its groves: In four recent projects, Pasadena accommodated trees by narrowing roadways and, in one revolutionary case, replaced a concrete sidewalk with one of decomposed granite on a two-block stretch of State Street.
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