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HEALTH
February 13, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Strength training has strong-armed its way beyond the realm of bodybuilding. A growing body of research shows that working out with weights has health benefits beyond simply bulking up one's muscles and strengthening bones. Studies are finding that more lean muscle mass may allow kidney dialysis patients to live longer, give older people better cognitive function, reduce depression, boost good cholesterol, lessen the swelling and discomfort of lymphedema after breast cancer and help lower the risk of diabetes.
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HEALTH
January 31, 2014 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
At 24, professional snowboarder Elena Hight is already a two-time Olympian and in training for the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Raised near the mountains in California, she began hitting the slopes as a child and competed in her first Olympics at age 16. Hight, now a full-time boarder, is also passionate about surfing and cooking. Here, she discusses how she stays in shape mentally and physically. How did you learn to snowboard and develop it as a passion? I was born in Hawaii, and my family relocated to the mountains in Lake Tahoe when I was 6 years old. My dad was a surfer his whole life, and the first thing he did when we relocated was teach my whole family to snowboard, and I just took to the sport real quickly, and it took off from there.
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SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Have you lifted weights today? Odds are, the answer is no. A new report on Americans' health vices says failure to do strength-training exercises is far more common than the more obvious bad behaviors of smoking, heavy drinking, being a couch potato and staying up way too late. Data drawn from 76,669 interviews taken as part of the 2008-10 National Health Information Survey show that 73.5% of Americans -- nearly 3 out of every 4 --  did not lift a single dumbbell, do a single push-up or take a single pilates class during their time away from work.
HEALTH
November 15, 2013 | By Jessica Q. Ogilvie
The Sundance Channel's "Push Girls" follows five women who face down everyday challenges - and each uses a wheelchair. The women find ways to do their favorite activities, date and live their lives to the utmost. Tiphany Adams and Mia Schaikewitz, two of the show's stars, talk about how they stay fit and healthy. What do you do to stay fit? Tiphany: What do I not do to stay fit? ... I want to make sure I'm getting at least 30 minutes of cardio. I do a class called SALT: sculpting, aerobics, lengthening and technique.
HEALTH
January 11, 1999 | KATHY SMITH
I'm gratified that so many readers took the time last year to respond to my columns in this paper. Many letters were complimentary, a few were critical and most contained questions. Of those questions, the majority centered on a single subject: strength training. What your letters have made clear to me is that strength training is a more complex topic than I thought and that several myths and misconceptions about it remain embedded in the public mind.
HEALTH
May 5, 2008 | Jay Blahnik, Special to The Times
My wife and I are active, and we try to set a good example for our kids. I weight train three or four days a week in the garage in my house, and my son (12 years old) has recently expressed interest in doing it with me. I don't want to discourage his interest in exercise, but I have heard strength training can stunt children's growth. Can you tell me if that is true? Troy Valencia Sensible strength training does not appear to inhibit a child's growth, according to research done on the subject.
HEALTH
September 24, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN
THE CORE PROGRAM: 15 Minutes a Day That Can Change Your Life, By Peggy W. Brill with Gerald Secor Couzens , Bantam Books $24.95, 256 pages. Physical therapist Peggy Brill has pulled together an excellent program for women (although men could clearly benefit too) that focuses on strengthening the body's core--the muscles of the abdomen, back, hips and pelvis.
HEALTH
April 27, 2009 | Karen Voight
Here's a move that combines yoga with strength training for double the payoff. You'll strengthen your arms and back while targeting your abs, buttocks and legs. -- Karen Voight 1 Standing with your feet together, hold a 5- to 8-pound dumbbell in each hand, arms dropped straight in front of you. Inhale and shift your body weight over your right leg. On an exhale, lean forward and raise your left leg behind you. Keep your abdominals pulled in to support your spine.
HEALTH
January 28, 2008 | Karen Voight
In strength training, making a slight change in your position can often make a difference. Doing the same exercises the same way puts muscles on "autopilot." Changing hand position in bent-over rows focuses more on the biceps and mid-back. -- Karen Voight -- 1 Stand with your feet hip-width apart, and hold a dumbbell in each hand. Bend forward at your hips to form a long, straight line with your spine, knees slightly bent.
HEALTH
December 14, 1998 | KATHY SMITH
In generations past, the aging process was a cruel and inevitable march toward decrepitude. Someone fortunate enough to reach the ancient age of 70 usually looked like Yoda--hunched, shriveled and frail. No wonder Ponce de Leon searched for the fabled Fountain of Youth. Today, however, we know that many of the physiological infirmities that used to make old age so oppressive aren't necessarily predestined.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Have you lifted weights today? Odds are, the answer is no. A new report on Americans' health vices says failure to do strength-training exercises is far more common than the more obvious bad behaviors of smoking, heavy drinking, being a couch potato and staying up way too late. Data drawn from 76,669 interviews taken as part of the 2008-10 National Health Information Survey show that 73.5% of Americans -- nearly 3 out of every 4 --  did not lift a single dumbbell, do a single push-up or take a single pilates class during their time away from work.
SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Dwight Howard won't need off-season surgery on his shoulder. Howard was examined on Wednesday by Dr. James Tibone of the Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Group, according to a  Lakers news release.  Tibone's assessment was that "surgery is not necessary at this time. " Howard tore the labrum in his right shoulder on Jan. 4 in a loss to the Clippers. During the season, the Lakers center sat out six games while dealing with soreness related to the tear. In late January, Howard told The Times surgery would knock him out for a lengthy period.
HEALTH
October 24, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not just cardio. Not just strength. For better calorie-burning, muscle-toning and all-round, time-efficient fitness, advocates of so-called fusion training say you need both - which explains CrossFit, P90X and the sudden rise of the hybrid, all-in-one workout machine. Three of the products below graft stretch cords or weights to bikes and ellipticals. Another works you head to toe with precarious off-the-ground movements that test agility and balance. All deliver fast, effective all-body workouts - provided you're willing to do the work.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Smokers may have another tool to use in the battle to stop puffing: resistance training. A pilot study found that men and women who did several weeks of strength training had better quit rates than those who watched health and wellness videos. Researchers tracked the progress of 25 male and female smokers, all of whom received nicotine patches and a counseling session on how to stop smoking. They were then randomly split into two groups--one did three months of resistance training, and the other watched twice-weekly videos on health-related topics.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A good training program can take a cyclist from the middle of the pack to the front. Get tips on improving endurance, speed and strength from top cycling coach Joe Friel in a live Web chat Monday, July 18, at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. Central time, 2 p.m. Eastern time). Friel is the author of "The Cyclist's Training Bible" and is a USA Triathlon and USA Cycling-certified elite-level coach. Friel, who lives in Scottsdale, Ariz., has a master's in exercise science, trains amateurs and pros, and is the founder of TrainingBible Coaching , a Web-based coaching site.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots bog
New exercise guidelines released by the American College of Sports Medicine Tuesday may be more detailed than the last, but don't worry -- the overriding message is that pretty much any kind of activity is better than sitting on the sofa. Thanks to copious new research the guidelines, last updated in 1998, got an upgrade. The 150-minute or more per week rule for cardio is still there, as is information on strength training. Perhaps the biggest change is the relaxing of stringent exercise guidelines, says Carol Ewing Garber, ACSM vice president and associate professor of movement science at Columbia University . The previous approach emphasized reaching goals for cardio and strength training, a la, "You must do this or you won't improve your fitness and health," Garber says.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | James S. Fell, Fell is a certified strength and conditioning specialist in Calgary, Canada.
My son is 12 years old, and he's going through a lot of changes in his life, most of which he'd rather not see published in this column. However, there is one change I have permission to relay: He's started lifting weights under my supervision. I can already hear the protestations of physicians and parents. "Blasphemy!" they cry. "It's not safe!" Many of them believe that weight training should wait until the end of puberty because it can cause serious, growth-stunting injury.
HEALTH
April 7, 2008 | Bruce Cohn, Special to The Times
Getting out of a chair, climbing stairs, reacting to a fall -- these everyday actions take more than strength or cardiovascular fitness. They require power as well. But this distinction can be lost on many people. Professional athletes know the importance of developing power, as do researchers studying the elderly. Average gym-goers may not.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Fibromyalgia expert Ginevra Liptan was our guest Monday for a Los Angeles Times Web chat. We didn't get to answer all of the questions during our hour with Dr. Liptan, but she has answered a few more questions for us here. Q: Are you advising against any kind of strength or lightweight training -- even if we are able to work it into our routine? -- Cheri   Liptan: I wanted to clarify this important point. Aggressive strength training with heavy weights has been the only form of exercise studied in fibromyalgia found to make people feel worse, not better.
HEALTH
February 14, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It goes without saying that children who are obese would benefit from aerobic exercise. However, they're likely to find the idea of going for a jog or spending half an hour on a treadmill about as appealing as watching Congress debate the fine points of tax policy on C-SPAN. Fortunately, there's an alternative form of exercise that plays to the strengths of plus-sized kids: weightlifting. It may sound like an unconventional suggestion, but I'm not the only one making it. There's even some evidence that for this demographic, weightlifting is a more effective gateway to a healthy lifestyle than traditional aerobic exercise.
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