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Strength Training

June 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots bog
New exercise guidelines released by the American College of Sports Medicine Tuesday may be more detailed than the last, but don't worry -- the overriding message is that pretty much any kind of activity is better than sitting on the sofa. Thanks to copious new research the guidelines, last updated in 1998, got an upgrade. The 150-minute or more per week rule for cardio is still there, as is information on strength training. Perhaps the biggest change is the relaxing of stringent exercise guidelines, says Carol Ewing Garber, ACSM vice president and associate professor of movement science at Columbia University . The previous approach emphasized reaching goals for cardio and strength training, a la, "You must do this or you won't improve your fitness and health," Garber says.
May 1, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Dwight Howard won't need off-season surgery on his shoulder. Howard was examined on Wednesday by Dr. James Tibone of the Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Group, according to a  Lakers news release.  Tibone's assessment was that "surgery is not necessary at this time. " Howard tore the labrum in his right shoulder on Jan. 4 in a loss to the Clippers. During the season, the Lakers center sat out six games while dealing with soreness related to the tear. In late January, Howard told The Times surgery would knock him out for a lengthy period.
January 31, 2014 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
At 24, professional snowboarder Elena Hight is already a two-time Olympian and in training for the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Raised near the mountains in California, she began hitting the slopes as a child and competed in her first Olympics at age 16. Hight, now a full-time boarder, is also passionate about surfing and cooking. Here, she discusses how she stays in shape mentally and physically. How did you learn to snowboard and develop it as a passion? I was born in Hawaii, and my family relocated to the mountains in Lake Tahoe when I was 6 years old. My dad was a surfer his whole life, and the first thing he did when we relocated was teach my whole family to snowboard, and I just took to the sport real quickly, and it took off from there.
January 12, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Strength training may be an essential part of a fitness program, but it also can be boring, bewildering or even intimidating to those who see the weight room as a place for muscle-bound hulks. The alternative to going one-on-one with a weight machine is strength-training classes. Offering full-body weight workouts in a group exercise setting, classes such as Body Pump, New Definitions and Powerflex use relatively lightweight barbells and dumbbells, plus resistance equipment.
February 26, 2007 | Jay Blahnik, Special to The Times
To take off extra inches, you don't necessarily need to start power walking, running, swimming or adding more time to existing cardio workouts. These are great calorie-burning options, but there is something else you can do -- a secret weapon in the fight against flab. It's strength training. Research has shown that adding just 3 pounds of muscle can increase resting metabolic rate by 7%. This means that with a little more muscle, your body burns more calories every day.
April 11, 1999 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When described in brochures and on Internet sites, outdoor vacations planned around physical activity look appealing, especially if you're often desk-bound or gridlocked. Among the most popular options: distance walking, kayaking and mountain climbing trips that range from a few days to a week or more. Participants explore as they exercise, viewing up close the beauty of national parks, historic locales and challenging landscapes.
October 27, 2008 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight is a freelance writer.
This is the beginning position for two similar exercises that will strengthen your bicep, shoulder and chest muscles using light dumbbells. If you are new to strength training, stick with the bent-arm version. As you get stronger, progress to the extended-arm version for a more intense workout. -- Karen Voight -- 1 Holding a light dumbbell in each hand, bend your arms out to the side with your elbows at shoulder level. Keep your arms level and close them in front of your chest (not shown).
August 3, 1998 | CAROL KRUCOFF
Before you zip up your vacation suitcase, tuck in a book to inspire and inform you about enhancing your life through physical activity. Here's a summer reading list of reputable, readable titles: * "The Spirited Walker," by Carolyn Scott Kortge (HarperSanFrancisco, 1998, 253 pages, $15).
October 24, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not just cardio. Not just strength. For better calorie-burning, muscle-toning and all-round, time-efficient fitness, advocates of so-called fusion training say you need both - which explains CrossFit, P90X and the sudden rise of the hybrid, all-in-one workout machine. Three of the products below graft stretch cords or weights to bikes and ellipticals. Another works you head to toe with precarious off-the-ground movements that test agility and balance. All deliver fast, effective all-body workouts - provided you're willing to do the work.
September 4, 1985 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
More college football games are being won in a place other than the football field than ever before. Check under the stands at the stadium or down those steps in the field house and find the weight room. That's where they are really doing it. You stare into mirrors hung on the wall so you can check out your technique and also your pecs, which is what weightlifters call the pectoral, or chest, muscles. Yes, you look marvelous.
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