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Strength Training

HEALTH
June 7, 1999 | KATHY SMITH
About 25 years ago, great masses of people first began to take up jogging. You couldn't drive down the street without passing a dozen joggers in new running shoes and Dolphin shorts. Maybe it was a reaction to the immense changes of the '60s and the '70s, but everybody, it seemed, suddenly wanted to get fit. Truly, jogging was the drug of the 1970s and 1980s. Releasing endorphins became the new turn-on.
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NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots bog
New exercise guidelines released by the American College of Sports Medicine Tuesday may be more detailed than the last, but don't worry -- the overriding message is that pretty much any kind of activity is better than sitting on the sofa. Thanks to copious new research the guidelines, last updated in 1998, got an upgrade. The 150-minute or more per week rule for cardio is still there, as is information on strength training. Perhaps the biggest change is the relaxing of stringent exercise guidelines, says Carol Ewing Garber, ACSM vice president and associate professor of movement science at Columbia University . The previous approach emphasized reaching goals for cardio and strength training, a la, "You must do this or you won't improve your fitness and health," Garber says.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011
How much strength training is enough to build muscles and garner some health benefits? Kent Adams, director of the exercise physiology lab at Cal State Monterey Bay, says most healthy people can follow the basic guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine, which recommends doing eight to 12 repetitions of eight to 10 strength-training exercises twice a week. (That's in addition to doing moderately intense cardio workouts for 30 minutes a day, five days a week.) But how can you tell whether you're using enough weight to build muscle?
HEALTH
January 12, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Strength training may be an essential part of a fitness program, but it also can be boring, bewildering or even intimidating to those who see the weight room as a place for muscle-bound hulks. The alternative to going one-on-one with a weight machine is strength-training classes. Offering full-body weight workouts in a group exercise setting, classes such as Body Pump, New Definitions and Powerflex use relatively lightweight barbells and dumbbells, plus resistance equipment.
HEALTH
November 28, 2005 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to dodging weight gain, high blood pressure and diabetes, most of us go for the cardio, trudging on the treadmill or easing into the elliptical trainer to slim down and get healthy. But aerobic activities aren't the only workouts that help stave off these problems, it turns out.
TRAVEL
April 11, 1999 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When described in brochures and on Internet sites, outdoor vacations planned around physical activity look appealing, especially if you're often desk-bound or gridlocked. Among the most popular options: distance walking, kayaking and mountain climbing trips that range from a few days to a week or more. Participants explore as they exercise, viewing up close the beauty of national parks, historic locales and challenging landscapes.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Smokers may have another tool to use in the battle to stop puffing: resistance training. A pilot study found that men and women who did several weeks of strength training had better quit rates than those who watched health and wellness videos. Researchers tracked the progress of 25 male and female smokers, all of whom received nicotine patches and a counseling session on how to stop smoking. They were then randomly split into two groups--one did three months of resistance training, and the other watched twice-weekly videos on health-related topics.
HEALTH
August 3, 1998 | CAROL KRUCOFF
Before you zip up your vacation suitcase, tuck in a book to inspire and inform you about enhancing your life through physical activity. Here's a summer reading list of reputable, readable titles: * "The Spirited Walker," by Carolyn Scott Kortge (HarperSanFrancisco, 1998, 253 pages, $15).
HEALTH
October 27, 2008 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight is a freelance writer.
This is the beginning position for two similar exercises that will strengthen your bicep, shoulder and chest muscles using light dumbbells. If you are new to strength training, stick with the bent-arm version. As you get stronger, progress to the extended-arm version for a more intense workout. -- Karen Voight -- 1 Holding a light dumbbell in each hand, bend your arms out to the side with your elbows at shoulder level. Keep your arms level and close them in front of your chest (not shown).
HEALTH
February 26, 2007 | Jay Blahnik, Special to The Times
To take off extra inches, you don't necessarily need to start power walking, running, swimming or adding more time to existing cardio workouts. These are great calorie-burning options, but there is something else you can do -- a secret weapon in the fight against flab. It's strength training. Research has shown that adding just 3 pounds of muscle can increase resting metabolic rate by 7%. This means that with a little more muscle, your body burns more calories every day.
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