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Strength Training

HEALTH
November 28, 2005 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to dodging weight gain, high blood pressure and diabetes, most of us go for the cardio, trudging on the treadmill or easing into the elliptical trainer to slim down and get healthy. But aerobic activities aren't the only workouts that help stave off these problems, it turns out.
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HEALTH
October 24, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Not just cardio. Not just strength. For better calorie-burning, muscle-toning and all-round, time-efficient fitness, advocates of so-called fusion training say you need both - which explains CrossFit, P90X and the sudden rise of the hybrid, all-in-one workout machine. Three of the products below graft stretch cords or weights to bikes and ellipticals. Another works you head to toe with precarious off-the-ground movements that test agility and balance. All deliver fast, effective all-body workouts - provided you're willing to do the work.
TRAVEL
April 11, 1999 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When described in brochures and on Internet sites, outdoor vacations planned around physical activity look appealing, especially if you're often desk-bound or gridlocked. Among the most popular options: distance walking, kayaking and mountain climbing trips that range from a few days to a week or more. Participants explore as they exercise, viewing up close the beauty of national parks, historic locales and challenging landscapes.
HEALTH
November 15, 2013 | By Jessica Q. Ogilvie
The Sundance Channel's "Push Girls" follows five women who face down everyday challenges - and each uses a wheelchair. The women find ways to do their favorite activities, date and live their lives to the utmost. Tiphany Adams and Mia Schaikewitz, two of the show's stars, talk about how they stay fit and healthy. What do you do to stay fit? Tiphany: What do I not do to stay fit? ... I want to make sure I'm getting at least 30 minutes of cardio. I do a class called SALT: sculpting, aerobics, lengthening and technique.
HEALTH
August 3, 1998 | CAROL KRUCOFF
Before you zip up your vacation suitcase, tuck in a book to inspire and inform you about enhancing your life through physical activity. Here's a summer reading list of reputable, readable titles: * "The Spirited Walker," by Carolyn Scott Kortge (HarperSanFrancisco, 1998, 253 pages, $15).
HEALTH
October 27, 2008 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight is a freelance writer.
This is the beginning position for two similar exercises that will strengthen your bicep, shoulder and chest muscles using light dumbbells. If you are new to strength training, stick with the bent-arm version. As you get stronger, progress to the extended-arm version for a more intense workout. -- Karen Voight -- 1 Holding a light dumbbell in each hand, bend your arms out to the side with your elbows at shoulder level. Keep your arms level and close them in front of your chest (not shown).
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of the hundreds of exercise gadgets that have graced TV airwaves over the years, only a handful ever become big-time sellers and even fewer become cultural phenomenons. The Shake Weight is definitely in that rarified category. Over 3.6 million people have watched the Shake Weight ad on YouTube, and millions more saw the device featured on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" and spoofed on "Saturday Night Live." If you've somehow missed the hoopla, an introduction is in order. The Shake Weight is a 2.5 pound dumbbell-shaped device with spring-loaded weights on each end. Instead of simply lifting the Shake Weight, users are instructed to grip it with two hands and shake it up and down as if priming a bottle of soda to explode.
SPORTS
September 4, 1985 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
More college football games are being won in a place other than the football field than ever before. Check under the stands at the stadium or down those steps in the field house and find the weight room. That's where they are really doing it. You stare into mirrors hung on the wall so you can check out your technique and also your pecs, which is what weightlifters call the pectoral, or chest, muscles. Yes, you look marvelous.
TRAVEL
December 18, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
THE slopes are ready, but is your body? For optimum results, you should have started pre-ski conditioning six weeks ago, says Linda Crockett, education director for the Professional Ski Instructors of America and the American Assn. of Snowboard Instructors. And that's if you are one of the 45.9% of adults who get at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week or at least 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week.
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