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Strep Throat

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HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
For 50 years, the common wisdom has been that a child's strep throat is best treated with that tried-and-true remedy: penicillin. But a review of dozens of previous studies involving thousands of youngsters has found that newer antibiotics called cephalosporins are better than penicillin at curing kids' infections.
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SCIENCE
December 27, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
That Christmas crib toy you got junior? It might be just the thing to give him strep throat, according to a new study. The bacteria that cause strep throat may linger far longer on inanimate objects than previous lab tests suggested, according to University of Buffalo researchers. Streptococcus pneumoniae , the leading cause of ear and respiratory tract infection in children, and Streptococcus pyogenes , the bacterial culprit behind strep throat and skin infections, lingered on surfaces in cribs, toys and books many hours after they had been cleaned, according to a study published Friday in the journal Infection and Immunity.
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NEWS
March 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A bacterium that in some forms eats flesh has killed 18 people in Texas in the last three months, the Texas Department of Health said. It said 89 cases of group A streptococcus have been reported in the state since Dec. 1. Health Department spokesman Doug McBride said the state usually has only 80 to 100 cases a year, with an average of seven resulting in death. The latest victim was a 5-year-old Houston boy who died Sunday.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The rare disease commonly known as flesh-eating bacteria has claimed another victim: a South Carolina woman who had just given birth to a healthy set of twins and who noticed an unusual spot on the back of her leg. Lana Kuykendall, 36, is a paramedic, and her profession might have helped save her life. She recognized the spot as something to be concerned about -- perhaps a blood clot -- and promptly sought medical help. She has undergone four surgeries so far to remove dead flesh as doctors scramble to keep one step ahead of the disease formally known as necrotizing fasciitis. So far, Kuykendall has not suffered any limb amputations -- often a devastating result of the disease.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | LEO SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Strep throat--a little infection with a nasty reputation. As children, we hear stories about it, how it starts out simply enough, with symptoms common to a cold, but can end up being something much worse. Because we are so young, we don't fully understand. As adults, many of us still don't have a full handle on strep. "I don't want to cause panic," said Dr. Chris Landon, head of the Pediatric Diagnostic Clinic at Ventura County Medical Center. "But we need to worry more about strep throat."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | Associated Press
For more than two centuries, the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has endured -- as has the speculation about what led to his sudden death at age 35 on Dec. 5, 1791. Was the wunderkind composer poisoned by a jealous rival? Did he have an intestinal parasite from an undercooked pork chop? Could he have accidentally poisoned himself with mercury used to treat a suspected bout of syphilis? A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine suggests the exalted Austrian composer might have succumbed to something far more commonplace: a streptococcal infection -- possibly strep throat -- that led to kidney failure.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | LISA MESSINGER, Lisa Messinger is a Los Angeles-based nutrition writer. and
Sara Frock of New Haven, Ind., says her family changes toothbrushes once a year when the dentist gives them new brushes at an annual visit. Waunita Lauder of Palmdale, Calif., says her husband changes his toothbrush when it gets bent out of shape because he is concerned about his gums and wants to avoid plaque and tartar buildup. Waiting until a toothbrush is worn out may not only affect dental health, it can have an effect on health, as well.
SPORTS
March 22, 1990 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lisa Leslie never missed a basketball game during her four-year varsity career at Morningside High School, a span of 133 games. As it turned out, her last game was the closest call. Leslie is resting at home this week, recovering from chicken pox and strep throat that nearly prevented her from playing in Saturday night's State Division I girls championship game in Oakland. Fortunately for Morningside, Leslie overcame the illnesses to lead the Lady Monarchs to their second consecutive title.
SPORTS
January 9, 2010 | By David Wharton
The season has brought no shortage of challenges for UCLA point guard Jerime Anderson . The sophomore has endured a stubborn groin injury, uneven play and, this week, getting benched. On Friday, Coach Ben Howland said, Anderson missed practice because of symptoms suggesting he has a case of strep throat. So the Bruins go into this afternoon's game at Stanford uncertain about whether they'll have Anderson -- who is taking antibiotics -- as a reserve off the bench. "Hopefully he'll be feeling up for [playing]
SPORTS
August 28, 2007 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
SEATTLE -- Luckily for the Seattle Mariners, Angels right-hander John Lackey was sick Monday night, pitching with symptoms consistent with strep throat -- coughing, sneezing, fever, difficulty swallowing. Who knows what Lackey would have done had he been feeling better. A no-hitter? A perfect game? As it was, Lackey threw a seven-hit shutout to lead the Angels to a 6-0 victory at Safeco Field in the opener of a three-game showdown between the American League West rivals.
SPORTS
January 9, 2010 | By David Wharton
The season has brought no shortage of challenges for UCLA point guard Jerime Anderson . The sophomore has endured a stubborn groin injury, uneven play and, this week, getting benched. On Friday, Coach Ben Howland said, Anderson missed practice because of symptoms suggesting he has a case of strep throat. So the Bruins go into this afternoon's game at Stanford uncertain about whether they'll have Anderson -- who is taking antibiotics -- as a reserve off the bench. "Hopefully he'll be feeling up for [playing]
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | Associated Press
For more than two centuries, the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has endured -- as has the speculation about what led to his sudden death at age 35 on Dec. 5, 1791. Was the wunderkind composer poisoned by a jealous rival? Did he have an intestinal parasite from an undercooked pork chop? Could he have accidentally poisoned himself with mercury used to treat a suspected bout of syphilis? A report in Tuesday's Annals of Internal Medicine suggests the exalted Austrian composer might have succumbed to something far more commonplace: a streptococcal infection -- possibly strep throat -- that led to kidney failure.
SPORTS
August 28, 2007 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
SEATTLE -- Luckily for the Seattle Mariners, Angels right-hander John Lackey was sick Monday night, pitching with symptoms consistent with strep throat -- coughing, sneezing, fever, difficulty swallowing. Who knows what Lackey would have done had he been feeling better. A no-hitter? A perfect game? As it was, Lackey threw a seven-hit shutout to lead the Angels to a 6-0 victory at Safeco Field in the opener of a three-game showdown between the American League West rivals.
SPORTS
February 27, 2007 | Mike Bresnahan, Times Staff Writer
Kobe Bryant was limping and wheezing, but he had enough left to throw a few teammates on his aching back. Lamar Odom wondered when he would feel like he did earlier in the season, but he went out and stirred memories of his first 20 games. The Lakers, for those who figured they were down or done, unfurled one of their best victories of the season against one of the league's stingiest home teams, beating the Utah Jazz at its own game in a physical 102-94 victory Monday at EnergySolutions Arena.
HEALTH
January 2, 2006 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
IF it seems that your child's strep throat is lasting longer than it should, there might be a reason for those extra weeks of painful swallowing and malaise. The commonly prescribed antibiotics penicillin and amoxicillin are becoming less effective against it, according to a study by pediatricians at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The reason: increased rates of antibiotic resistance among bacteria in the mouth. The study, conducted by Dr. Michael Pichichero and Dr.
HEALTH
April 19, 2004 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
For 50 years, the common wisdom has been that a child's strep throat is best treated with that tried-and-true remedy: penicillin. But a review of dozens of previous studies involving thousands of youngsters has found that newer antibiotics called cephalosporins are better than penicillin at curing kids' infections.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Before the nightly news showed gruesome photos of human limbs devoured, before drive-time deejays yukked up the dreaded "flesh-eating bacteria," before British tabloids screamed, "Killer Bug Ate My Face," and people fretted over an epidemic that does not exist, there was Luis. This little boy, then 4, arrived at the emergency room of Childrens Hospital Los Angeles 18 months ago. He had a bad case of chickenpox, and his parents said his hip hurt.
SPORTS
October 14, 1987
Laker guard Michael Cooper, who has played in 519 consecutive games, including playoffs, has a strep throat and has missed seven of the team's workouts in their Palm Desert training camp.
HEALTH
May 6, 2002
As a physician, I was greatly interested by your article about the outbreak of a strain of Group A streptococcus that is resistant to macrolide antibiotics--key drugs that are used to treat not only strep throat but also pneumonia and other serious infections ("Resistant Strep Sounds a Warning," April 22). While the story noted that this outbreak has major implications for the way doctors think about and prescribe antibiotics in this country, it should also have major implications for the continued use of antibiotics in meat production.
HEALTH
April 22, 2002 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outbreak of strep throat resistant to a common antibiotic could be considered a wake-up call that some drugs may fail when they're needed. In monitoring 100 children at a Pittsburgh school last year, Dr. Judith M. Martin found 46 children with strains resistant to erythromycin, one of the most frequently used drugs for strep. Although some children never became ill, others had to be treated with different antibiotics.
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