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Streptokinase Drug

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NEWS
March 4, 1991
Molina was elected to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and declared her election a mandate for more government. She has said that she wants to enlarge the Board of Supervisors to seven members--maybe nine. However, as historic and important as it was, her victory was no mandate. Only 24% of the people in the 1st Supervisorial District voted. Molina's share of the vote amounted to little more than 13% of the district's registered voters.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991
Molina was elected to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and declared her election a mandate for more government. She has said that she wants to enlarge the Board of Supervisors to seven members--maybe nine. However, as historic and important as it was, her victory was no mandate. Only 24% of the people in the 1st Supervisorial District voted. Molina's share of the vote amounted to little more than 13% of the district's registered voters.
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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
One of the most consuming questions in heart-attack treatment--which of two revolutionary clot-dissolving drugs is preferable--has received a surprising partial answer from one of the first studies to compare the two therapies. The study, published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the two competing drugs--one priced at $2,200 per treatment, the other costing one-tenth as much--are equally effective in preserving the pumping power of the heart.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts say Genentech Inc. has done a masterful job of building brand loyalty among doctors for its most important product, the heart attack drug TPA. But because of an Italian study showing TPA--at $2,200 a dose--to be no more effective than a rival drug costing less than one-tenth as much, doctors may be hard pressed to justify TPA to cost-conscious hospitals. A University of Michigan professor of medicine, Dr.
NEWS
March 30, 1988
A two-year international study of more than 17,000 heart patients showed that aspirin and the clot-dissolving drug streptokinase, taken together after the onset of chest pains, reduce heart attack deaths. The research in 400 hospitals in 16 countries is billed as the largest heart attack treatment study ever. It was presented at the annual meeting in Atlanta of the American College of Cardiology.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Genentech Inc., a biotechnology company whose fortunes have hinged largely on sales of its heart attack drug Activase, said Monday that it has won permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to claim that the medicine can save the lives of some patients. "With this approval, we can effectively communicate the key benefit of Activase--namely, it saves lives," the company said in a prepared statement.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | From Reuters
An expensive drug used to dissolve blood clots in heart attack victims is no more effective than a competing drug that costs one-tenth as much, a large Italian study of TPA and streptokinase released Thursday in Florence shows. The long-awaited study, involving 19,000 patients, is the largest study ever to directly compare the drugs in heart attack victims.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Biotechnology pioneer Genentech Inc., reeling from slower-than-expected demand for its ballyhooed heart attack drug, has halted production of the substance for the rest of the year. "Genentech ran its manufacturing plant at a rate considerably higher than sales," explained Frederick M. Hoar, a spokesman for the South San Francisco-based company. "The company is currently maintaining adequate stock of TPA . . . and has suspended production. We've satisfied our inventory goals for 1988."
BUSINESS
August 24, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Genentech won a skirmish in its global battle to protect its genetically engineered heart attack drug from direct competition Tuesday when the U.S. Patent Office awarded the company a patent covering the technology for its production. This was the second major patent awarded Genentech this year for TPA, which has been touted as the first blockbuster drug from the biotechnology industry.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1990 | LINDA WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Analysts say Genentech Inc. has done a masterful job of building brand loyalty among doctors for its most important product, the heart attack drug TPA. But because of an Italian study showing TPA--at $2,200 a dose--to be no more effective than a rival drug costing less than one-tenth as much, doctors may be hard pressed to justify TPA to cost-conscious hospitals. A University of Michigan professor of medicine, Dr.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | From Reuters
An expensive drug used to dissolve blood clots in heart attack victims is no more effective than a competing drug that costs one-tenth as much, a large Italian study of TPA and streptokinase released Thursday in Florence shows. The long-awaited study, involving 19,000 patients, is the largest study ever to directly compare the drugs in heart attack victims.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
One of the most consuming questions in heart-attack treatment--which of two revolutionary clot-dissolving drugs is preferable--has received a surprising partial answer from one of the first studies to compare the two therapies. The study, published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the two competing drugs--one priced at $2,200 per treatment, the other costing one-tenth as much--are equally effective in preserving the pumping power of the heart.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Genentech Inc., a biotechnology company whose fortunes have hinged largely on sales of its heart attack drug Activase, said Monday that it has won permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to claim that the medicine can save the lives of some patients. "With this approval, we can effectively communicate the key benefit of Activase--namely, it saves lives," the company said in a prepared statement.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Biotechnology pioneer Genentech Inc., reeling from slower-than-expected demand for its ballyhooed heart attack drug, has halted production of the substance for the rest of the year. "Genentech ran its manufacturing plant at a rate considerably higher than sales," explained Frederick M. Hoar, a spokesman for the South San Francisco-based company. "The company is currently maintaining adequate stock of TPA . . . and has suspended production. We've satisfied our inventory goals for 1988."
BUSINESS
August 24, 1988 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Genentech won a skirmish in its global battle to protect its genetically engineered heart attack drug from direct competition Tuesday when the U.S. Patent Office awarded the company a patent covering the technology for its production. This was the second major patent awarded Genentech this year for TPA, which has been touted as the first blockbuster drug from the biotechnology industry.
NEWS
March 30, 1988
A two-year international study of more than 17,000 heart patients showed that aspirin and the clot-dissolving drug streptokinase, taken together after the onset of chest pains, reduce heart attack deaths. The research in 400 hospitals in 16 countries is billed as the largest heart attack treatment study ever. It was presented at the annual meeting in Atlanta of the American College of Cardiology.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Franklin Sotolongo injected himself with the vial of experimental liquid that day in 1985, it was one of the most emotional moments of his life. Sotolongo was leading a small team of Cuban scientists struggling to save their nation from an epidemic of group B meningitis. Hundreds of children were dying, and there was neither a cure nor a vaccine--not only on their isolated Communist island, but anywhere on the globe.
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