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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993
Mentally and emotionally ill people did not just disappear when we closed the hospitals and then the mental health clinics; they are there, plain to see, on the streets, and, to pay for dearly, in jails and prisons. Doing away with all "stress claims" in workers' compensation because a few crooks were stealing money from us all will cause irreparable harm to thousands of good, hard-working people who have legitimate stress claims and psychiatric complications of physical injuries.
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NEWS
August 13, 2010
News that BP is unlikely to pay any claims related to mental-health problems caused by the oil spill has angered health groups around the country. On Friday, the American Psychiatric Assn. became the latest organization to demand that BP treat mental-health claims similarly to claims of physical illness or injury caused by the spill. BP claims administrator Kenneth Feinberg testified recently before the House Judiciary Committee that the company will probably not spend any of the $20 billion relief fund to settle mental-health claims.
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OPINION
January 21, 1996
Your Jan. 11 editorial asked for an explanation about questions a deputy city attorney asked LAPD Officer Virginia Acevedo about her personal relationships in connection with her worker's compensation claim for job-related stress. Concern has been raised by the ACLU, City Council and news media that Acevedo was asked those questions--which she refused to answer--because she is a lesbian. My response to those concerns is that neither gender nor sexual orientation is a factor in pursuing that line of questioning in worker's compensation stress claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1996 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the same day South Pasadena officials launched a review of his performance as police chief, Thomas Mahoney says he became unable to work because of stress, according to a workers' compensation claim filed by Mahoney. The documents filed in Van Nuys workers' compensation court indicate that the city is contesting his claim.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claims of job-induced mental stress soared in California in the 1980s, providing a costly new dilemma for employers and increasingly turning the misty terrain of an individual's mind into a legal battlefield.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move expected to break the state's budget logjam and clear the way for higher taxes on the wealthy, Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders reached final agreement Tuesday on a scaled-back proposal limiting the right of workers to collect disability payments for stress suffered on the job. Passage of a workers' compensation bill was considered crucial to winning enough Republican votes for an additional $2.3 billion in taxes needed to balance the state budget.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1991
On behalf of the California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, I am writing to clarify the state AFL-CIO position on recent workers' compensation legislation that was the subject of Harry Bernstein's Labor column, "Little Compensation in Capitol Fight" (July 23). Our workers' compensation struggle before the state Legislature during the closing days of the recent budget crisis did not involve demands for increases in compensation benefits. It was centered on defeat of the massive take-aways proposed by the Wilson Administration and the employer-insurance community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993
Kudos to Gov. Pete Wilson and the Legislature for pulling the plug on California's job-killing machine, the fraud-ridden, $11 billion workers' compensation system ("Wilson Signs Workers' Comp Overhaul Plan," July 17). By cutting down on abuse and limiting stress claims, the governor's reform package will save taxpayers $1.5 billion and stem the tide of businesses and jobs out of the Golden State. Finally it will only take one Californian to screw in a light bulb. Not his lawyer to sue for a stress-related injury and eight doctors to corroborate the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992
Your editorial is misguided in praising Margolin's bill as "ambitious reform." I urge you to compare the details of the legislation with the recommendations you made in your April 28 editorial. You will find that Margolin's bill is little more than a sham. The bill does not eliminate stress claims, does not give enough employers control over medical costs, does not significantly reduce the cost of medical-legal evaluations, and does not sufficiently reform vocational rehabilitation.
NEWS
February 3, 1985 | ROBERT WELKOS and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writers
Although stress pensions have risen dramatically in the Los Angeles Police Department during the last five years, they are rare in many other major law enforcement agencies outside California. In New York, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Kansas City, Miami and Philadelphia, police officers work under increasing stress, experts say, but the pension systems there have not been hit hard by stress claims.
OPINION
January 21, 1996
Your Jan. 11 editorial asked for an explanation about questions a deputy city attorney asked LAPD Officer Virginia Acevedo about her personal relationships in connection with her worker's compensation claim for job-related stress. Concern has been raised by the ACLU, City Council and news media that Acevedo was asked those questions--which she refused to answer--because she is a lesbian. My response to those concerns is that neither gender nor sexual orientation is a factor in pursuing that line of questioning in worker's compensation stress claims.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | From The Times Washington Bureau
SLEEP-INDUCING: Hounded by demanding constituents and surrounded by angry political foes, members of Congress often lead hectic, exhausting lives. But they shouldn't be allowed to file workers' compensation claims on the basis of their inherently stressful existence, says Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.). She has introduced legislation that would prohibit members to file stress claims as a result of their jobs. "Stress comes with the territory," Boxer says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1993 | SCOTT HADLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Santa Paula residents are questioning how newly chosen Mayor Wayne Johnson can collect money for a work-related stress disability claim he filed in May while still meeting the day-to-day demands of the mayor's job. Johnson, 53, an insurance salesman for the California Automobile Assn. in Ventura, filed the claim this spring after experiencing chest pains at work. Johnson, who has served on the Santa Paula City Council since 1990, had heart bypass surgery in 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993
Kudos to Gov. Pete Wilson and the Legislature for pulling the plug on California's job-killing machine, the fraud-ridden, $11 billion workers' compensation system ("Wilson Signs Workers' Comp Overhaul Plan," July 17). By cutting down on abuse and limiting stress claims, the governor's reform package will save taxpayers $1.5 billion and stem the tide of businesses and jobs out of the Golden State. Finally it will only take one Californian to screw in a light bulb. Not his lawyer to sue for a stress-related injury and eight doctors to corroborate the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993
Mentally and emotionally ill people did not just disappear when we closed the hospitals and then the mental health clinics; they are there, plain to see, on the streets, and, to pay for dearly, in jails and prisons. Doing away with all "stress claims" in workers' compensation because a few crooks were stealing money from us all will cause irreparable harm to thousands of good, hard-working people who have legitimate stress claims and psychiatric complications of physical injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992
Your editorial is misguided in praising Margolin's bill as "ambitious reform." I urge you to compare the details of the legislation with the recommendations you made in your April 28 editorial. You will find that Margolin's bill is little more than a sham. The bill does not eliminate stress claims, does not give enough employers control over medical costs, does not significantly reduce the cost of medical-legal evaluations, and does not sufficiently reform vocational rehabilitation.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Calling the California workers' compensation system an "insatiable beast" that devours billions of dollars a year, a coalition of business and insurance companies warned Monday that the system will collapse unless legislators try to curtail the burgeoning number of stress-related disability claims.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | From The Times Washington Bureau
SLEEP-INDUCING: Hounded by demanding constituents and surrounded by angry political foes, members of Congress often lead hectic, exhausting lives. But they shouldn't be allowed to file workers' compensation claims on the basis of their inherently stressful existence, says Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.). She has introduced legislation that would prohibit members to file stress claims as a result of their jobs. "Stress comes with the territory," Boxer says.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | MIKE WARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charging that workers' compensation costs are forcing businesses to cut jobs or move out of California, the San Gabriel Valley Economic Council has unveiled a proposal to revamp the system and put a cap on costs. Chairman Tim Cullinan said the council, organized by major employers to promote business growth in the region, is seeking bipartisan legislative backing for the changes. Under the proposal, employers would pay 3% of their payroll to a workers and family health fund.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1991
On behalf of the California Labor Federation, AFL-CIO, I am writing to clarify the state AFL-CIO position on recent workers' compensation legislation that was the subject of Harry Bernstein's Labor column, "Little Compensation in Capitol Fight" (July 23). Our workers' compensation struggle before the state Legislature during the closing days of the recent budget crisis did not involve demands for increases in compensation benefits. It was centered on defeat of the massive take-aways proposed by the Wilson Administration and the employer-insurance community.
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