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Stress Management

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
La Palma Intercommunity Hospital is taking advance registrations for a free seminar on stress management to be conducted May 22 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The session will be in the doctors' dining room of the hospital, 7901 Walker St. "The program will discuss the physical and mental signs of stress, how stress impacts health, and effective relaxation techniques," a hospital spokeswoman said. Although there is no cost for this program, reservations are recommended.
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SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Teenagers in America report they are just as stressed out as adults, according to a new study by the American Psychological Assn. And during the school year, many teens report even higher stress levels than adults. In an online survey of 1,018 teens and 1,950 adults conducted in August, the average stress level reported by teens during the school year was 5.8 on a 10-point scale where 1 is least stressed and 10 is most stressed. Adults reported an average stress level of 5.1.  Teens were a bit more relaxed in the summer, though, when their reported stress level fell to 4.1. "We assumed that teens experience stress, but what was surprising was that it was so high compared to adults," said Norman Anderson, chief executive of the APA. "In adulthood there are work pressures, family pressures and economic pressures, but adolescents still reported higher levels of stress.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | ERIC RIMBERT
A free seminar discussing ways to reduce stress will be held at Kaiser Permanente Woodland Hills on Wednesday. Three speakers will explain different stress-reduction techniques. Experts will discuss medical, physical and holistic approaches to stress management, said Lisa Kort, a spokeswoman for the hospital. The event is sponsored by the hospital's Woman's Wellness Committee, a group that meets to discuss health issues.
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Can an employer cancel an employee's time off? In February, a friend of mine told his boss he was going to take off March 24-29. His boss said it was OK. The company does not provide paid vacation time, by the way. My friend bought a round-trip ticket. But two weeks before the trip, his boss told him he could not go and that if he did, he would be fired. Should my friend sue? Sam Schwiner San Francisco Answer: Your friend should not sue if he wants to keep his job, although he might want to evaluate whether he wants to work for someone who doesn't keep his word.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Harriet B. Braiker, psychologist, expert on stress management and best-selling author of self-help books, including "The Type E Woman" and "The September 11 Syndrome," has died. She was 55. Braiker died Saturday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena of respiratory failure after suffering from pneumonia, said her husband, Steven Fink.
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: Can an employer cancel an employee's time off? In February, a friend of mine told his boss he was going to take off March 24-29. His boss said it was OK. The company does not provide paid vacation time, by the way. My friend bought a round-trip ticket. But two weeks before the trip, his boss told him he could not go and that if he did, he would be fired. Should my friend sue? Sam Schwiner San Francisco Answer: Your friend should not sue if he wants to keep his job, although he might want to evaluate whether he wants to work for someone who doesn't keep his word.
HEALTH
December 31, 2001
If one of your New Year's resolutions is to stop smoking, the American Lung Assn. may be able to help. Freedom From Smoking Online offers 24-hour support, with information on stress management, substitute behaviors and maintaining a smoke-free lifestyle. Go to www.lungusa.org.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Teenagers in America report they are just as stressed out as adults, according to a new study by the American Psychological Assn. And during the school year, many teens report even higher stress levels than adults. In an online survey of 1,018 teens and 1,950 adults conducted in August, the average stress level reported by teens during the school year was 5.8 on a 10-point scale where 1 is least stressed and 10 is most stressed. Adults reported an average stress level of 5.1.  Teens were a bit more relaxed in the summer, though, when their reported stress level fell to 4.1. "We assumed that teens experience stress, but what was surprising was that it was so high compared to adults," said Norman Anderson, chief executive of the APA. "In adulthood there are work pressures, family pressures and economic pressures, but adolescents still reported higher levels of stress.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Job stress may boost the risk of heart disease in women, suggests a Women's Health Study survey. A Los Angeles Times story explains how researchers defined high job stress among the more than 17,000 women in the study. Still, there's no need to panic. We've rounded up some tips on stress management. For starters, check out Help Guide . For a full primer on stress management, read what HealthKey has to say. Start here: Learn better ways to manage your time.
NEWS
March 9, 1986
AMI Hawthorne Hospital will this week dedicate two adjoining commercial buildings near the hospital that have been leased and converted for medical use. The building at 12954 S. Hawthorne Blvd. will be used for medical offices for five staff physicians. The building at 12950 S. Hawthorne Blvd.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Yoga is recommended for many reasons, including stress management and improving flexibility. But so many different styles and instructors make it tough to choose. Here's an expert who can offer some clarity. Christine Burke, co-owner and director of Liberation Yoga in Los Angeles, will be the guest at a live Web chat Monday (11 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Eastern) about different styles of yoga and how to find a qualified instructor. Here's a guide from the American Council on Exercise that explains the different types.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Job stress may boost the risk of heart disease in women, suggests a Women's Health Study survey. A Los Angeles Times story explains how researchers defined high job stress among the more than 17,000 women in the study. Still, there's no need to panic. We've rounded up some tips on stress management. For starters, check out Help Guide . For a full primer on stress management, read what HealthKey has to say. Start here: Learn better ways to manage your time.
HEALTH
July 12, 2010 | By Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Is there an app for that?" When it comes to consumer healthcare applications for smart phones, the answer, increasingly, is yes. There are now close to 6,000 consumer health apps, according to a review published in March by mobihealthnews, which reports on the mobile health industry, and more are being added every day. Many are free, or cost $1 to $10 to download. Some physicians are concerned about the reliability of the medical information provided by many of these apps, which offer advice and information on a wide array of health topics, including how to find a doctor, first aid for an emergency and exercise instructions.
SPORTS
October 23, 2007 | Ross Newhan, Special to The Times
It wasn't really a titillating revelation, merely Bill Stoneman's way to describe the 24/7, energy-depleting nature of the general manager's job. Nodding at his wife sitting in the front row at the news conference where he confirmed that he was resigning as the Angels' general manager, an emotional Stoneman forced a smile and said Diane was unaware "when she married me that I would have a mistress."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | Cynthia Daniels, Times Staff Writer
For a week, Sara Telona learned the choreography for Mexican folklore dances, mastered the words to folk songs and took a crash course in marimba and xylophone playing -- all part of classes that can help her renew her teaching credential. While skeptics may wonder what all that has to do with her duties as a third-grade, dual-language teacher at Grand View Boulevard Elementary School in Los Angeles, Telona sees a strong connection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Harriet B. Braiker, psychologist, expert on stress management and best-selling author of self-help books, including "The Type E Woman" and "The September 11 Syndrome," has died. She was 55. Braiker died Saturday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena of respiratory failure after suffering from pneumonia, said her husband, Steven Fink.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Yoga is recommended for many reasons, including stress management and improving flexibility. But so many different styles and instructors make it tough to choose. Here's an expert who can offer some clarity. Christine Burke, co-owner and director of Liberation Yoga in Los Angeles, will be the guest at a live Web chat Monday (11 a.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Eastern) about different styles of yoga and how to find a qualified instructor. Here's a guide from the American Council on Exercise that explains the different types.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995
Crestline was the name of a highly touted town that really never existed. During the development boom of the 1880s, a local newspaper gave much attention to the announcement that a new town was springing up just east of Santa Ana along the proposed Santa Ana-Long Beach railroad. Developers envisioned a city with its center at Brookhurst Street and Bolsa Avenue. They promised schools, highways and stores. But the railroad was never built, and plans for Crestline eventually died.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2003 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
Snowstorms in the East. Long lines. Tighter security. A terrorist threat index that morphs into a scarier color. The prospect of war. And you have plans to fly. "After the code orange went into effect, I felt the tension [at airports] rise," Tom Parsons says of the switch to a "high" level of terrorist threat. Parsons, the CEO and founder of www.bestfares.com, noticed the difference in early February, just a week after another trip.
HEALTH
December 31, 2001
If one of your New Year's resolutions is to stop smoking, the American Lung Assn. may be able to help. Freedom From Smoking Online offers 24-hour support, with information on stress management, substitute behaviors and maintaining a smoke-free lifestyle. Go to www.lungusa.org.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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