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Stress

ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
By 1991, Mike Kelley had emerged as a crucial artist in Los Angeles, at the head of a pack that had pushed into prominence in the previous decade. His riveting sculptures reassembled from ratty stuffed animals, crocheted dolls and other tattered children's playthings that he scavenged from thrift shops were also generating considerable critical attention far beyond the city. Then 36, Kelley was invited to participate in the Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh, one of the oldest and most respected surveys of its kind.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
It costs about $2,000 to buy an ounce of the illegal drug, the therapist said - enough for roughly 150 doses. She pays her longtime dealer in cash; he gives her a Ziploc bag of white powder. Back home, she scoops the contents into clear capsules. She calls it "the medicine"; others know it as MDMA, the active ingredient in the party drug Ecstasy. MDMA has been banned by the federal government since 1985 as a dangerous recreational drug with no medical value. But interest is rising in its potential to help people suffering from psychiatric or emotional problems.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Evan Halper and Cindy Carcamo
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration handed backers of medical marijuana a significant victory Friday, opening the way for a University of Arizona researcher to examine whether pot can help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress, a move that could lead to broader studies into potential benefits of the drug. For years, scientists who have wanted to study how marijuana might be used to treat illness say they have been stymied by resistance from federal drug officials. The Arizona study had long ago been sanctioned by the Food and Drug Administration, but under federal rules, such experiments can use marijuana only from a single, government-run farm in Mississippi.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Take a deep breath, meditation enthusiasts: A new study finds that research on mindfulness meditation has yielded moderate evidence that the practice can reduce anxiety, depressive symptoms and pain, but little to no evidence that it can reduce substance abuse or improve mood, sleep or weight control. And no evidence was found that meditation programs were better than drugs, exercise or other behavioral therapies at addressing issues of mental health.  The latest word on meditation's effects comes from a meta-analysis--essentially a study of existing clinical trials that sifts, consolidates and distills their findings.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By David Keeps
For Academy Award winners and presenters, the Architectural Digest green room is a backstage oasis of pampering calm, a place where the stars can perch on bar stools without rumpling their clothes and steady themselves with a cup of coffee or a cocktail. “And there has always been a place for people to smoke,” said David Rockwell, who was the original architect of the Dolby Theatre in 2001 (when it was known as the Kodak) and created sets for the 2009 Oscar broadcast. “It was the loading dock.” Tapped by Architectural Digest to create this year's green room, Rockwell has transformed that loading dock into a California garden room that adjoins the green room, a first for the Academy Awards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
Many federal programs aimed at preventing psychological problems in military service members and their families have not been evaluated correctly to determine if they are working and are not supported by science, a new report commissioned by the Defense Department says. "A lot of their programs don't have any good data behind them," said Kenneth Warner, a professor of public health at the University of Michigan who led the Institute of Medicine committee that produced the report.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Stress is known to trigger headaches. Now it gets worse: Researchers have found that the more intense a person's stress, the more time he or she will spend in pain. The findings are based on data from the German Headache Consortium Study. Researchers interviewed 5,159 adults about their headache history and other health factors once every three months from 2010 to  2012. Among other things, volunteers were asked to rate the intensity of their stress on a 100-point scale. Tension headaches - the most common type - were the most sensitive to stress, the researchers found.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Do hormones drive volatility in world financial markets? According to new research, chronically high levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, can alter the behavior of beleaguered financial traders, boosting their risk aversion and inspiring "irrational pessimism. " In a paper published Monday in journal PNAS, researchers found that London financial traders experienced a 68% increase in cortisol levels during periods of market volatility. When researchers reproduced similar levels of chemicals in human subjects in the lab, they observed a "large" change in the study participants's willingness to take on risk.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Money worries are killing romance right when we need it, on Valentine's Day. The holiday means pricey dinners and sparkly gifts, an outlay of cash -- and added financial stress -- for many Americans. For those wanting to add some romantic sizzle, money worries are a cold shower. PHOTOS: For Valentine's Day, monogamous animals A recent survey shows money-related stress may be snuffing out sexual desire.  A majority of Americans surveyed in the Harris poll, conducted for financial data company Yodlee , thought about money more often than sex -- 62% of those 18 and older.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Teenagers in America report they are just as stressed out as adults, according to a new study by the American Psychological Assn. And during the school year, many teens report even higher stress levels than adults. In an online survey of 1,018 teens and 1,950 adults conducted in August, the average stress level reported by teens during the school year was 5.8 on a 10-point scale where 1 is least stressed and 10 is most stressed. Adults reported an average stress level of 5.1.  Teens were a bit more relaxed in the summer, though, when their reported stress level fell to 4.1. "We assumed that teens experience stress, but what was surprising was that it was so high compared to adults," said Norman Anderson, chief executive of the APA. "In adulthood there are work pressures, family pressures and economic pressures, but adolescents still reported higher levels of stress.
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