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Strife

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Demonstrators set a car on fire and exploded bombs Sunday to protest last week's killing of an 18-year-old student leader, Dominican news reports said Sunday. Homemade bombs went off in the street on the fourth day of disturbances in San Francisco de Macoris, northeast of the capital. Three cars, two belonging to a leader of the governing Reformist Party and one to the Roman Catholic Church, were set ablaze Saturday night.
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WORLD
January 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV. Ukraine -- In a desperate bid to stop the violence in Kiev and to keep his job, embattled Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovich offered the prime minister's job late Saturday to opposition leader Arseny Yatsenyuk. The president also offered the position of deputy premier for humanitarian issues to another opposition leader, former world heavy weight boxing champion Vitali Klitschko. The announcement was made to reporters by a Yanukovich aide after a long day of talks with the opposition leadership and amid renewed clashes between anti-government protesters and riot police in downtown Kiev.
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WORLD
May 6, 2009
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT - A pair of suicide bombings at Iran's embassy that killed an Iranian diplomat and at least 24 other people underscored how the violence in Syria has traversed borders and fanned sectarian tensions across the Middle East. Lebanon has long been a secondary theater of the Syrian conflict, but Tuesday's twin blasts in Beirut were a blow aimed directly at Iran, one of the major foreign backers of the embattled government of Syrian President Bashar Assad. Beginning with peaceful protests during the "Arab Spring" that challenged Assad's autocratic rule, Syria's strife has devolved over the last 32 months into a regional proxy war stoked by sectarian malice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991
Surely, our government, which professes to want peace in the Middle East, must realize that an additional $10 billion "loan" to Israel for more settlements will guarantee continued strife. With our own domestic needs unmet, the last thing U.S. taxpayers want is to support a religious state. LOIS HIRE Cathedral City
OPINION
July 10, 2005
Re "Searching for Lessons in Jefferson High Melee," July 6 Why should anyone be surprised by the racial chaos described in your article on Jefferson High School? When the primary focus of the curriculum seems to have become the instilling of racial and ethnic pride, it makes perfect sense that strife would result. Here's an idea: Ignore race. Teach kids to embrace American culture. I seem to remember Martin Luther King Jr. saying something about judging people based on the content of their character, not the color of their skin.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | KAY BARTLETT, Associated Press
Shawn Robbins, psychic, author and mail-order entrepreneur, has turned her big hazel eyes toward Wall Street since the stock market has become so volatile. A shaky market is good for people in her line of work, she says. "For psychics," she says, "the market is boring when it's good, but now is the chance to really shine with psychic abilities. This is a good time to go to a 'reputable psychic.' "Be careful, though. This is not the time to go to Madame Ripoff on the corner with your portfolio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
Democrats vs. Republicans: Isn't it amazing that when the other side does it, it suddenly becomes wrong, not to mention illegal and immoral. FRANK GLASS Lakewood
OPINION
May 26, 1996
Re "Forecast Stormy for Graduation Day at Yale," May 17: I would suggest that one reason the Yale administration will not settle with unions is that the fat cats who so heavily endow the university would be extremely upset. Many of these CEOs give big bucks to Yale and other universities and are loath to have them set a precedent that actually represents a social consciousness. ARTHUR HOBERMAN Thousands Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1991
While the world's attention has focused on how to drive Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait, the Somali people of the Horn of Africa have focused on how to drive dictator Mohamed Siad Barre out of Somalia. Since Dec. 30, when the rebels of the United Somali Congress began to wage a conventional war against the government of Siad Barre, some 2,000 Somalis are reported to have died while the rest of Mogadishu's (the capital city of Somalia) residents (2 million) have become refugees without a refuge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Susan King
Gilles Legrand's harrowing psychological drama "You Will Be My Son," which opened Wednesday, is a study in contrasts. Set in a lush French vineyard estate in Saint-Émilion near Bordeaux, the film captures the beauty and bouquet of the legendary wine region. But behind the walls of the estate lurks a dark ugliness: Paul de Marseul (Niels Arestrup), the passionate, brilliant winemaker with the heart of a monster who treats his mild-mannered grown son Martin (Lorànt Deutsch) like a dog. Though his son has tried all his life to please his widower father, Paul doesn't think Martin has what it takes to take over the family business.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By Taffy Brodesser-Akner
When Francesca Lia Block sat down to write her latest young adult novel, "Love in the Time of Global Warming" (Holt Books for Young Readers: 240 pp., $16.99), she took her beloved hometown of Los Angeles and destroyed it. But she didn't just destroy it. She burned it to the ground in the lyrical, hallucinogenic way in which she once elevated the very same city to celestial heights in her first novel, "Weetzie Bat," and all the adult and young adult fiction she's written since. We meet 17-year old Penelope, the book's protagonist, briefly during the catastrophic environmental event that she calls the "earth shaker," and then in earnest two weeks later, adjusting to a new reality.
WORLD
April 8, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- It perhaps goes without saying that the death of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did not prompt universal mourning. She could be a polarizing figure, nowhere more than in working-class communities of northern England, Scotland and Wales, where residents bitterly recall the fierce fights against her closure of Britain's mines in the 1980s, actions that caused thousands to lose their livelihoods. The National Union of Miners posted a few words of condolence to the Thatcher family, but followed it with a reminder: “The legacy of what the Conservative government did to British industry under Thatcher is not one to be proud of if you really did want the best for the people.” The working class had suffered “decimation” in the name of the free market, the message said, adding that “Thatcher lived long enough to see her beliefs demolished when the 'free market' collapsed and came running to the state for support.
WORLD
April 6, 2013 | By Ned Parker and Lava Selo
BEIRUT -- Lebanon's political blocs united behind a compromise choice for prime minister Saturday, two weeks after his predecessor quit office under the cloud of the civil war in neighboring Syria.  Tammam Salam, endorsed nearly unanimously by the parliament, vowed in a televised speech to maintain a stable Lebanon and to shield the country from the troubles next door. He was tasked with forming a Cabinet by Lebanese President Michel Suleiman and approved by 124 of the 128 parliament members.
SPORTS
January 9, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Commissioner Gary Bettman apologized to hockey-deprived fans and those who play and financially support the game after announcing unanimous approval from the NHL's Board of Governors on Wednesday for the tentative labor deal the league had reached with the players' association early Sunday. "I'm sorry. I know that an explanation or an apology will not erase the hard feelings that have built up over the past few months, but I owe you an apology nonetheless," he said during a news conference in New York.
OPINION
January 9, 2013 | By Rajan Menon
After 22 months of civil war, in which an estimated 60,000 people have died, Syrian President Bashar Assad gave a defiant speech Sunday that ruled out negotiations with rebel fighters and made clear that he intends to remain in power as long as possible. Assad's words came as no great surprise. Seasoned diplomats, including former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, have tried and failed to broker a peace. So why does the war drag on? One key reason is that neither side believes it is losing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999 | AL MARTINEZ
Malibu is up in arms again, but this time it isn't due to a slide blocking the free flow of traffic. It's the City Council blocking the free flow of news. When I first heard of Malibu's effort to manacle the press, I couldn't believe it. This is a city whose famous inhabitants glory in media attention, and they're trying to muzzle us? What am I missing here?
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
It is a neighborhood of small shops, corner delis and tidy houses and apartment buildings with statues of saints adorning front-yard gardens. On summer evenings, families lounge in aluminum lawn chairs and chat merrily with their neighbors, many speaking in their native Italian, as kids play freely in the quiet streets.
SPORTS
January 8, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman, Los Angeles Times
The lockout giveth, and the lockout (almost) taketh. April 7, 2012. In Calgary. An otherwise meaningless game between the Flames and Ducks, two teams with nothing on the line. That could have been it, the career finale for one of the league's incandescent stars, future Hall of Fame member Teemu Selanne. Cooler heads and one dogged federal mediator pulled the NHL season back from the brink Sunday, meaning Selanne will have the chance for a happier ending to his career. "It came into my mind it could be my last," Selanne said Monday about that April game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
HOMEWOOD, Calif. - She was born under a house on the west shore of Lake Tahoe and quickly became a beloved fixture in this rustic community. She rambled through backyards and climbed into open windows to snack. She swam in the lake's impossibly blue water and sunned herself on the beach as if on an extended vacation. Residents nicknamed her Sunny. She was one of Lake Tahoe's "celebrity bears" - animals so familiar, so seemingly at ease around humans that they've become de facto residents of this forested idyll where the boundary between wilderness and civilization has all but disappeared.
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