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Strikebreakers

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SPORTS
March 16, 1995 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking baseball players would not agree to a settlement in which replacement games are counted in the standings and strikebreakers' statistics are made part of official records, Eugene Orza, associate general counsel of the union, said Wednesday. "It's not smart to draw a line in the sand in collective bargaining, but this is one time when we're drawing a line in the sand," Orza said.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 2006 | Martin Zimmerman, Times Staff Writer
The Ralphs grocery chain plans to plead guilty to charges that it illegally rehired hundreds of locked-out workers during the bitter Southern California supermarket dispute more than two years ago, the company's parent said Thursday. Cincinnati-based Kroger Co. said in a regulatory filing that Ralphs "expects to enter into an agreement that will include a plea of guilty to some of the charges" in a 53-count indictment handed up in December by a federal grand jury in Los Angeles.
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SPORTS
February 26, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Peter Bavasi, the Angels' general manager, distributed a one-page questionnaire to players after practice Saturday, asking if they would be willing to participate in exhibition games and, in effect, be labeled as strikebreakers. Players have until this afternoon to return the questionnaire, but a team official said many of the 49 in camp had already done so before heading back to the clubhouse. The Angels open their exhibition season against Arizona State on Wednesday night in Tempe.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2003 | Nancy Cleeland and Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writers
To keep its warehouses stocked and its delivery trucks running without the Teamsters union, Ralphs Grocery Co. has turned to a convicted felon with a history of legal woes. Clifford L. Nuckols, a veteran of the strikebreaking business, has hired hundreds of people and brought them from around the country to the Los Angeles area, where the supermarket strike and lockout are in their tenth week.
SPORTS
February 26, 1995 | Associated Press
Ten minor league players walked off the practice field at Port Charlotte, Fla., on Saturday in protest of the Texas Rangers' plans to use them in exhibition games. "I let them know I wasn't coming down here to be a replacement player," catcher Craig Colbert said. "It can be a bad influence on your career and the rest of your life."
SPORTS
April 4, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three players impressed the Angels enough during replacement spring training to earn assignments to the team's triple-A affiliate in Vancouver, where they will be teammates of several 40-man roster players who were on strike for almost eight months. Tony Mack, who went 1-2 with a 2.77 earned-run average; Darrel Akerfelds, who was 1-0 with a 1.80 ERA, and infielder Jose Peguero, who hit .333 with eight runs batted in, were among 20 replacement players reassigned to the minors.
SPORTS
March 3, 1995 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They sat in the cramped visitors' clubhouse Thursday, exchanging nervous glances, wondering if the other guys were just as frightened. Most of them are little more than kids, and now they were about to step across the symbolic picket line, 28 of them at Ft. Lauderdale Stadium, dressed in genuine Dodger uniforms. "It was pretty quiet in there," infielder Mike Busch said. "Nobody really knew what to say. You could see it in their eyes, especially the young kids. They were scared.
SPORTS
March 16, 1995 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
The Dodger replacement team is taking this all quite seriously. They boast about being the best team in the Grapefruit League, flaunt their talents, and truly believe this is a team that should make the real Dodgers proud. "Hey, if we build up a five-, 10-game lead in the standings by the time this strike is over, those guys will love us," Dodger replacement pitcher Rafael Montalvo said. 'We can help get them into the playoffs. Who knows, they may even thank us when it's all over."
SPORTS
February 26, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With 97 shopping days before the June 1 baseball draft, Angel General Manager Bill Bavasi spent Friday afternoon at a display window in San Diego, where Nebraska outfielder Darin Erstad, one of the nation's top college prospects, was playing in a tournament. Bavasi liked what he saw. "A very nice looking, all-around player," he said. The question is, would the Angels have enough money to purchase such a prized product? The Angels, for the first time in 20 years, have the No.
SPORTS
March 5, 1995 | Jim Murray
Baseball, after all, is just a game. It can be played anywhere. By anybody. I got my first lesson in this regard in 1958. When the Dodgers moved from Ebbets Field to the L.A. Coliseum, the game's purists were appalled, then angered. It was the ruination of tradition, we were told.
SPORTS
March 7, 2003 | Bill Plaschke
The shirts lie folded under a counter at the stadium souvenir shop, collecting dust, reeking of dishonesty. The words, "World Series Champions" are on the front. The lie fills the back. That's where the Angel roster is listed, a player-by-player tribute that is missing a player. Brendan Donnelly isn't there. He was there last October, recording one of the Angels' four World Series victories. He was there, pitching 7 1/3 scoreless innings in the Series. He was there with a 2.
SPORTS
October 1, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The executive board of the Major League Umpires Assn. voted Monday to boycott all playoff games until Baltimore Oriole second baseman Roberto Alomar's five-game suspension for spitting at American League umpire Mark Hirschbeck takes effect. Three of the four division playoff series begin today, and Richie Phillips, counsel to the umpires union, said the umpires are entrenched in their position.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton lost another round in court in his attempt to bar federal contracts to companies that hire permanent replacement workers during strikes. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected, 9-2, the administration's request that the full court review a ruling by three of its judges that threw out Clinton's executive order.
SPORTS
March 9, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no traffic light. No movie theater. No church. There is a filling station. A bar. A grocery store. And that's about it in Donahue, Iowa, population 600. So you can imagine the reaction when a local boy becomes a professional baseball player and makes it to the major leagues. It was the biggest news in Donahue since the filling station burned down. So on the night of Aug. 30, 1995, folks who didn't mind staying up late, and had cable service, pulled up to their TV sets.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Friday overturned a White House effort to protect striking workers, throwing out an order by President Clinton that would cut off federal contracts for companies that permanently replace the strikers. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court declared unanimously that the National Labor Relations Act gives employers "the right to permanently replace economic strikers as an offset to the employees' right to strike."
SPORTS
December 11, 1995 | Associated Press
New York Yankee pitcher David Pavlas was the only replacement player voted a share of postseason money by the regular players. As the Dodgers vowed, Mike Busch was voted nothing. Busch was 4 for 17 (.235) with three home runs and six runs batted in after serving as a strike-replacement player. The only other replacement who got postseason money besides Pavlas, who got $250, was Jose Mota of the Kansas City Royals, but all players on the major league roster from June 1 on got a full share.
SPORTS
July 23, 1995 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last spring, San Diego Padre management asked a minor leaguer, Archi Cianfrocco, to become a replacement player. No thought was required for Cianfrocco. He needed only flashbacks of his fire-suited father, Angelo, standing in front of a blazing furnace for the last 36 years, dodging flying molten droplets of copper. Then he said, "No." He couldn't. He wouldn't. He didn't. Today, Archi Cianfrocco (Ark-ey Sin-frocco) is a major leaguer.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball's replacement players found out Friday that they are like nuclear bombs. Everyone has them, but no one wants to use them. The vacuum-cleaner salesmen, Home Depot clerks and insurance agents who stepped in for striking major leaguers said they knew this all along. They said the apparent settlement of baseball's labor dispute came as no surprise.
SPORTS
November 8, 1995 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leon Wood thought it would take three or four years to fulfill his dream to become an NBA referee. But his timetable has been accelerated because of the contract dispute between the referees union and the NBA owners. With the regular referees on strike, Wood became one of the replacement officials used for exhibition games and regular-season games that started last week. "We knew during our training . . . that something like this could happen, so we were prepared for it," Wood said.
SPORTS
September 1, 1995 | MIKE DOWNEY
On the brink of dissension or collapse, the Dodgers capped off one of their longest weeks in years by mending fences before their game Thursday and saving face during it. Had they blown a five-run lead and not come back to win this game with the New York Mets, panic could have been just around the corner for a team that is desperately trying to get itself straightened out.
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