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Strikes Bangladesh

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July 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Muslim fundamentalists, demanding a feminist writer be put to death as a blaspheming infidel, clashed with opponents and police Thursday on the streets of Bangladesh's capital. Businesses in Dhaka were closed and the streets empty of traffic as the result of a half-day strike called by Islamic militants to demand Taslima Nasrin's execution for allegedly insulting the Koran.
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NEWS
July 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Muslim fundamentalists, demanding a feminist writer be put to death as a blaspheming infidel, clashed with opponents and police Thursday on the streets of Bangladesh's capital. Businesses in Dhaka were closed and the streets empty of traffic as the result of a half-day strike called by Islamic militants to demand Taslima Nasrin's execution for allegedly insulting the Koran.
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NEWS
September 22, 1986
Strikes shut Bangladesh's newspapers, hospitals and universities, stirring fears of violence ahead of the presidential election next month. Autonomy for the nation's six universities was demanded by striking teachers, who see this as a way to end campus violence. The teachers also want higher pay. All medical services except hospital emergency care were halted by striking doctors, who seek better jobs for new medical graduates.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | Reuters
Thousands of Bangladeshi doctors began a 24-hour strike Sunday that severely affected seven government hospitals and dozens of private clinics, hospital officials said. Witnesses said hundreds of patients were refused admission to hospitals. The Bangladesh Medical Assn., which represents about 10,000 doctors, threatened a three-day stoppage beginning Wednesday unless the government gives more money to health services.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | Reuters
Thousands of Bangladeshi doctors began a 24-hour strike Sunday that severely affected seven government hospitals and dozens of private clinics, hospital officials said. Witnesses said hundreds of patients were refused admission to hospitals. The Bangladesh Medical Assn., which represents about 10,000 doctors, threatened a three-day stoppage beginning Wednesday unless the government gives more money to health services.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | United Press International
Thousands of university workers joined teachers on strike Wednesday and forced the shutdown of universities across Bangladesh, already hit by doctor and newspaper employee walkouts. About 12,000 workers struck the nation's eight universities, which had been operating for 20 days without 8,000 teachers who walked out demanding special pay. The latest walkout forced the universities to shut their doors.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | From Reuters
About 50 Bangladeshi journalists began a hunger strike Sunday to protest a move by a publishing house to close its two newspapers in a wage dispute. The journalists said their "fast unto death" will continue until the owners of the Bangladesh Observer and the Chitrali settle the wage dispute and drop a plan to shut the papers. The Bangladesh Observer, the country's largest circulation English daily, and the Chitrali, its sister Bengali weekly, ceased publication last week.
NEWS
May 7, 1991
"Bangladesh, Bangladesh, Where so many people are dying fast And it sure looks like a mess." That's how George Harrison saw this land of seemingly perennial disaster when the former Beatle wrote a song about it for an Aug. 1, 1971, famine relief concert in New York's Madison Square Garden.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | United Press International
Thousands of university workers joined teachers on strike Wednesday and forced the shutdown of universities across Bangladesh, already hit by doctor and newspaper employee walkouts. About 12,000 workers struck the nation's eight universities, which had been operating for 20 days without 8,000 teachers who walked out demanding special pay. The latest walkout forced the universities to shut their doors.
NEWS
September 22, 1986
Strikes shut Bangladesh's newspapers, hospitals and universities, stirring fears of violence ahead of the presidential election next month. Autonomy for the nation's six universities was demanded by striking teachers, who see this as a way to end campus violence. The teachers also want higher pay. All medical services except hospital emergency care were halted by striking doctors, who seek better jobs for new medical graduates.
NEWS
June 23, 1986 | From Reuters
About 50 Bangladeshi journalists began a hunger strike Sunday to protest a move by a publishing house to close its two newspapers in a wage dispute. The journalists said their "fast unto death" will continue until the owners of the Bangladesh Observer and the Chitrali settle the wage dispute and drop a plan to shut the papers. The Bangladesh Observer, the country's largest circulation English daily, and the Chitrali, its sister Bengali weekly, ceased publication last week.
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