Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrikes Canada
IN THE NEWS

Strikes Canada

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
General Motors laid off at least 1,850 U.S. employees Monday as a Canadian Auto Workers strike began to have an affect on the auto maker's domestic production. The U.S. workers were sent home because the parts they make for Canadian plants aren't needed; 1,050 of the layoffs were at a GM Powertrain plant in Tonawanda, N.Y., near Buffalo, said GM spokeswoman Darla Park. A transmission plant in Ypsilanti, Mich., had 800 layoffs, she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge refused to order Ontario's striking teachers back to work, saying provincial officials had failed to prove the walkout has seriously harmed the 2.1 million students affected. In what is the largest teachers strike ever in North America, nearly all of Ontario's 126,000 teachers walked off the job Thursday.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To New York sports agent Lou Oppenheim, the names of the divisions say it all. In major league baseball, basketball and football, the teams are grouped into geographic divisions called East, West, Central, Pacific and so on. But in the National Hockey League, there are such names as the Campbell Conference, after a revered former league president, and the Smythe Division, after the late owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bargainers reached a tentative agreement Tuesday ending the unexpectedly long strike against General Motors Corp. in Canada, clearing the way for what is expected to be a quick and peaceful resolution of labor talks in GM's far larger U.S. operations. The 20-day strike--the second major walkout for GM in North America this year--idled 46,000 auto workers from Oshawa, Ontario to Casa Grande, Mexico.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boeing Workers Offer to End Strike: The Canadian Auto Workers Union said it offered to meet with Seattle-based Boeing Co. in an effort to end a monthlong strike that has the world's largest maker of commercial jets racing to avoid parts shortages. Union members at Boeing's plant in Winnipeg account for only 870 of the company's 107,000 employees worldwide, but the 2,500 parts they make are critical to keeping production running. Boeing is taking extraordinary steps to avoid shortages.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Plants to Feel Impact of CAW Strike: Second-shift workers at Detroit-based General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac assembly plant will not report to work today because of the Canadian Auto Workers strike and thousands more U.S. assembly employees may be laid off this week, GM said. The Cadillac plant will operate with only one shift today and Tuesday, when it is expected to halt production completely unless the strike is resolved, GM spokesman Thomas Klipstine said.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bargainers reached a tentative agreement Tuesday ending the unexpectedly long strike against General Motors Corp. in Canada, clearing the way for what is expected to be a quick and peaceful resolution of labor talks in GM's far larger U.S. operations. The 20-day strike--the second major walkout for GM in North America this year--idled 46,000 auto workers from Oshawa, Ontario to Casa Grande, Mexico.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Strike Closes GM Plant in Canada: General Motors Corp., still recovering from an Ohio parts plant strike that idled workers across North America, suffered another blow when workers at its joint-venture plant with Suzuki Motor Corp. walked out. The 2,100 workers at the assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario, say their wages and working conditions lag those of other Canadian employees of the Big Three auto makers.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Now is the time to push for the permanent closure of the "roadblocks" that exist on I-5 and I-15. The latest tragedy in Temecula greatly magnifies a daily problem created by the so-called Border Patrol. How many lives have to be lost and how much property destroyed due to the otherwise unemployable cowboys who pose as U.S. officers? There is no way to explain the death of a father and his graduating son. No way! Let's get the Border Patrol back on the border.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Motors laid off second-shift workers at a Detroit Cadillac plant, the latest Americans caught in the cross fire of a strike against the auto maker in Canada. Already, the 10-day-old strike by the Canadian Auto Workers union has shut down all GM plants across Canada and has been blamed for hundreds of layoffs at American GM plants that depend on factories struck by CAW. The Cadillac plant here depends on trim parts from a Windsor, Canada, plant to make Eldorados, Sevilles and DeVilles.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bargainers for the Canadian Auto Workers and General Motors Corp. neared agreement late Monday on a three-year contract that would end a 19-day strike against the giant auto maker. The two sides negotiated past a noon settlement deadline established by the union as progress was reported on key issues, including the sale of two parts factories and farming out work to nonunion contractors. "We are virtually there," said GM spokesman Stewart Low. "There are some Ts to cross and I's to dot.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Plants to Feel Impact of CAW Strike: Second-shift workers at Detroit-based General Motors Corp.'s Cadillac assembly plant will not report to work today because of the Canadian Auto Workers strike and thousands more U.S. assembly employees may be laid off this week, GM said. The Cadillac plant will operate with only one shift today and Tuesday, when it is expected to halt production completely unless the strike is resolved, GM spokesman Thomas Klipstine said.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
General Motors laid off second-shift workers at a Detroit Cadillac plant, the latest Americans caught in the cross fire of a strike against the auto maker in Canada. Already, the 10-day-old strike by the Canadian Auto Workers union has shut down all GM plants across Canada and has been blamed for hundreds of layoffs at American GM plants that depend on factories struck by CAW. The Cadillac plant here depends on trim parts from a Windsor, Canada, plant to make Eldorados, Sevilles and DeVilles.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
General Motors laid off at least 1,850 U.S. employees Monday as a Canadian Auto Workers strike began to have an affect on the auto maker's domestic production. The U.S. workers were sent home because the parts they make for Canadian plants aren't needed; 1,050 of the layoffs were at a GM Powertrain plant in Tonawanda, N.Y., near Buffalo, said GM spokeswoman Darla Park. A transmission plant in Ypsilanti, Mich., had 800 layoffs, she said.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1996 | From Associated Press
A strike against General Motors Corp. in Canada is jeopardizing its hopes for a smooth introduction of a new line of vehicles this fall and could force U.S. assembly plants to shut down if it lasts more than a couple of weeks. The Canadian Auto Workers struck GM's Canadian unit late Wednesday, with 15,000 members walking out at three plants in Oshawa and one in St. Therese. The union plans to spread the strike to other Canadian plants Sunday and Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boeing Workers Offer to End Strike: The Canadian Auto Workers Union said it offered to meet with Seattle-based Boeing Co. in an effort to end a monthlong strike that has the world's largest maker of commercial jets racing to avoid parts shortages. Union members at Boeing's plant in Winnipeg account for only 870 of the company's 107,000 employees worldwide, but the 2,500 parts they make are critical to keeping production running. Boeing is taking extraordinary steps to avoid shortages.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge refused to order Ontario's striking teachers back to work, saying provincial officials had failed to prove the walkout has seriously harmed the 2.1 million students affected. In what is the largest teachers strike ever in North America, nearly all of Ontario's 126,000 teachers walked off the job Thursday.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bargainers for the Canadian Auto Workers and General Motors Corp. neared agreement late Monday on a three-year contract that would end a 19-day strike against the giant auto maker. The two sides negotiated past a noon settlement deadline established by the union as progress was reported on key issues, including the sale of two parts factories and farming out work to nonunion contractors. "We are virtually there," said GM spokesman Stewart Low. "There are some Ts to cross and I's to dot.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Strike Closes GM Plant in Canada: General Motors Corp., still recovering from an Ohio parts plant strike that idled workers across North America, suffered another blow when workers at its joint-venture plant with Suzuki Motor Corp. walked out. The 2,100 workers at the assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario, say their wages and working conditions lag those of other Canadian employees of the Big Three auto makers.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992
Now is the time to push for the permanent closure of the "roadblocks" that exist on I-5 and I-15. The latest tragedy in Temecula greatly magnifies a daily problem created by the so-called Border Patrol. How many lives have to be lost and how much property destroyed due to the otherwise unemployable cowboys who pose as U.S. officers? There is no way to explain the death of a father and his graduating son. No way! Let's get the Border Patrol back on the border.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|