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Strikes England

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BUSINESS
June 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canary Wharf Tenants Threaten Rent Strike: A group of 10 tenants that have already moved into Olympia & York Development's Canary Wharf project in London's docklands are threatening not to pay $4.7 million in rent, the Sunday Times said. The tenants are frustrated by lack of information from court-appointed administrators, lack of action to resolve the development's status and the conditions of their offices, the paper said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The protest that would lead to a significant change in British law guaranteeing equal pay for women begins inauspiciously enough. It's a summery day in 1968 in the factory town of Dagenham, not far from London. The morning streets are filled with workers bicycling into the massive Ford Motors plant. Most of the facility is state-of-the art new, but the women are relegated to sewing car seat covers in an old sweatshop of the type that put the sweat in the shop. It's so hot they strip down to their bras (strictly utilitarian, no Victoria's Secret here)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Rim trade sputtered to a halt and dozens of mammoth cargo ships sat idle in their ports Monday as union dockworkers from Los Angeles to Seattle stayed off the job in a one-day show of support for striking longshoremen in Liverpool, England.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A 24-hour technicians' strike wiped out dozens of the British Broadcasting Corp.'s domestic news programs and curtailed some of its international broadcasts. The technicians' union said 7,000 members walked off the job in a dispute over what they view as the gradual privatization of BBC, funded largely by compulsory license fees. The BBC has undergone huge changes in the past five years as managers seek to adapt to increasing competition.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | From Times Staff, Wire Reports
Air travelers braced themselves for more disruptions today as British Airways cabin crews began the second day of their strike with no resolution in sight. As both sides squabbled over the legality of their 72-hour work stoppage, more than 25,000 passengers were stranded Wednesday when the airline canceled half its flights from London and up to 30% of the 1,000 flights it operates worldwide each day.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two highly publicized events in Great Britain in the last few days--a union vote authorizing a strike at the prestigious Financial Times newspaper and a landmark court case involving phone company typists--have thrown the spotlight on the growing problem of repetitive strain injuries among the nation's white-collar workers. Like the United States, Britain has faced an ever-increasing number of RSI cases among workers whose jobs require long hours at video display terminals.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A 24-hour technicians' strike wiped out dozens of the British Broadcasting Corp.'s domestic news programs and curtailed some of its international broadcasts. The technicians' union said 7,000 members walked off the job in a dispute over what they view as the gradual privatization of BBC, funded largely by compulsory license fees. The BBC has undergone huge changes in the past five years as managers seek to adapt to increasing competition.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Airways is the world's largest airline, and now it has a world-class public relations problem on its hands. Thousands of BA passengers leaving from London's Heathrow Airport have been arriving at their destinations around the globe without their luggage because of a labor dispute. And, not surprisingly, they're not very happy. "I'm outraged," said Linda DeFato of Phoenix, who flew from Heathrow to Los Angeles on Oct. 27, then discovered that her three bags were missing.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
More than 1,000 workers at three Ford Motor Co. Ltd. plants began wildcat strikes today, two days before their unions and the auto maker were scheduled to resume contract negotiations. Ford said more than 700 workers at its Bridgend engine plant in South Wales put down their tools during the morning to protest the company's 10.2% pay hike offer, bringing the plant to a standstill.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The protest that would lead to a significant change in British law guaranteeing equal pay for women begins inauspiciously enough. It's a summery day in 1968 in the factory town of Dagenham, not far from London. The morning streets are filled with workers bicycling into the massive Ford Motors plant. Most of the facility is state-of-the art new, but the women are relegated to sewing car seat covers in an old sweatshop of the type that put the sweat in the shop. It's so hot they strip down to their bras (strictly utilitarian, no Victoria's Secret here)
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | From Times Staff, Wire Reports
Air travelers braced themselves for more disruptions today as British Airways cabin crews began the second day of their strike with no resolution in sight. As both sides squabbled over the legality of their 72-hour work stoppage, more than 25,000 passengers were stranded Wednesday when the airline canceled half its flights from London and up to 30% of the 1,000 flights it operates worldwide each day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1997 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pacific Rim trade sputtered to a halt and dozens of mammoth cargo ships sat idle in their ports Monday as union dockworkers from Los Angeles to Seattle stayed off the job in a one-day show of support for striking longshoremen in Liverpool, England.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Airways is the world's largest airline, and now it has a world-class public relations problem on its hands. Thousands of BA passengers leaving from London's Heathrow Airport have been arriving at their destinations around the globe without their luggage because of a labor dispute. And, not surprisingly, they're not very happy. "I'm outraged," said Linda DeFato of Phoenix, who flew from Heathrow to Los Angeles on Oct. 27, then discovered that her three bags were missing.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canary Wharf Tenants Threaten Rent Strike: A group of 10 tenants that have already moved into Olympia & York Development's Canary Wharf project in London's docklands are threatening not to pay $4.7 million in rent, the Sunday Times said. The tenants are frustrated by lack of information from court-appointed administrators, lack of action to resolve the development's status and the conditions of their offices, the paper said.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1991 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two highly publicized events in Great Britain in the last few days--a union vote authorizing a strike at the prestigious Financial Times newspaper and a landmark court case involving phone company typists--have thrown the spotlight on the growing problem of repetitive strain injuries among the nation's white-collar workers. Like the United States, Britain has faced an ever-increasing number of RSI cases among workers whose jobs require long hours at video display terminals.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
More than 1,000 workers at three Ford Motor Co. Ltd. plants began wildcat strikes today, two days before their unions and the auto maker were scheduled to resume contract negotiations. Ford said more than 700 workers at its Bridgend engine plant in South Wales put down their tools during the morning to protest the company's 10.2% pay hike offer, bringing the plant to a standstill.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British tourists Lucy Pembrey and Clare Topliss didn't get much of a welcome to Los Angeles when they stepped off their train Wednesday at Union Station. They got the word that they had reached the end of the line--at least until an East Coast machinists' union strike is settled and Amtrak passenger train service resumes.
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