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Strikes Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Saying that a teachers strike in the Los Angeles Unified School District would be "unethical," Gov. Pete Wilson on Friday lashed out against the threatened action as negotiators continued to wrestle with complex proposals to avert it. "There should not be a strike," said Wilson, who was in Los Angeles attending a political fund-raiser. "It may be legal but I really don't think it's ethical."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000
Seeking insurance against a strike during the Democratic National Convention in mid-August, Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday asked state Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer to seek a court order declaring a 60-day cooling off period in contract talks between the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and transit unions.
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BUSINESS
August 4, 1994 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With bus service returning to normal today, Los Angeles businesses and their workers are starting to recover from the nine-day transit strike that is estimated to have cost the community $18 million in wages, sales and efficiency. Worst hit by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority strike were shopping areas that depend on bus-riding customers and businesses whose employees commute to work by bus. The losses came to $1.5 million a day in Downtown Los Angeles alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesus Perez spent Tuesday afternoon preparing for another night of scrubbing toilets, vacuuming floors and dusting office desktops in a downtown Los Angeles skyscraper. But Perez, who has done the work for the past 20 years, said this night would be different. He is among those returning to the job after a three-week strike by Los Angeles janitors that drew national attention to the plight of low-wage workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997
Other waterfront unions pledged support for striking port pilots Friday as city officials rejected the strikers' latest contract proposal, an attorney said. The pilots lowered their salary request from $195,000 a year to the $160,000 range, but city officials "indicated they were not interested," said union attorney Beth Garfield. As the labor dispute reached its 64th day, three International Longshore and Warehouse Union locals pledged $120,000 in financial assistance to the 10 striking pilots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Escalating a four-year labor dispute, Southern California rabbis today will urge a halt to Jewish donations to USC as they link the hardship of university workers with their own sacred fast day dedicated to commemorating community suffering and loss. The action, aimed at obtaining job security for USC food and housing workers, comes on the fast day of Tisha b'Av. The day of mourning marks the ancient destruction of the two Jerusalem temples and the long history of other Jewish calamities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Los Angeles transit strike left weekend shoppers and leisure travelers stranded, negotiations in the weeklong strike continued with both sides agreeing to talk until they could hammer out a settlement on some "very, very difficult issues." But with no agreement reached as of Sunday evening, the walkout was poised to enter its second week today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1996 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,000 people and scores of political leaders gathered at a Labor Day celebration in downtown Los Angeles on Monday to herald the resurgence of organized labor and support delivery drivers on strike at Southern California's largest tortilla company. "I have a message for everyone here and for everyone all the way back to the East Coast: Working people are not going to take it anymore," said AFL-CIO Executive Vice President Linda Chavez Thompson, who spoke at the rally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994
For the duration of the strike, the metropolitan Transportation Authority has established emergency service on seven of the San Fernando Valley's busiest routes. There are fewer buses on those lines, however, and MTA officials cautioned passengers to expect to wait twice as long as usual between buses. For example, they said, if a bus normally reaches a particular stop every 20 minutes, buses on the emergency lines will probably arrive up to 40 minutes apart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994
Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus service was nearly back to normal Thursday with the entire 1,900-bus fleet expected to hit the street today. MTA officials predict a 5% drop in riders because of the nine-day strike by union mechanics, which was settled Wednesday. No post-strike ridership figures were immediately available, however. The fare--normally $1.10--will remain at 50 cents through Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Escalating a four-year labor dispute, Southern California rabbis today will urge a halt to Jewish donations to USC as they link the hardship of university workers with their own sacred fast day dedicated to commemorating community suffering and loss. The action, aimed at obtaining job security for USC food and housing workers, comes on the fast day of Tisha b'Av. The day of mourning marks the ancient destruction of the two Jerusalem temples and the long history of other Jewish calamities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second time in five weeks, 330 unionized nurses and other employees of Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center went on a one-day strike Friday to protest wages and staffing levels, and were joined by 75 strikers and Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl at Midway Hospital Medical Center in Los Angeles. Both hospitals are owned by Santa Barbara-based Tenet Healthcare Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | PATRICK KERKSTRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor protests and mass arrests punctuated the usual pomp and circumstance of USC graduation Friday as 200 striking employees rallied for a new contract and blocked intersections just off campus while graduates inside the university walls happily collected diplomas. Most of the graduates and their sharply dressed families tried their best to ignore the vocal protesters, hovering news helicopters and police in riot gear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles City Council approved a new contract agreement Tuesday with the tiny union of port pilots, raising salaries by about 9.5% annually for 3 1/2 years and bringing an end to the employees' 4-month-old strike. Under terms of the settlement, which the council unanimously approved in a closed session, the 16 port pilots' annual salaries will jump from $113,712 to $122,376 when they return to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
Most of the approximately 300 food service and housing workers at USC walked off their jobs Wednesday in a one-day protest of what they view as a lack of job security and to demand long-term contracts for all employees, union officials said. A spokesman for Local 11 of the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union estimated that 90% of the university's food service and housing workers walked off their jobs. Campus officials said about 60% walked out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1997
Frustrated with the apparent stalemate in talks with the city's striking port pilots, the Los Angeles City Council voted in closed session Tuesday to make their "last, best and final" offer--a legal step that clears the way for an independent mediator to resolve the dispute. The council decision, which comes 75 days into the strike, means that city negotiators will return to the bargaining table one more time to offer the pilots' union a 17% pay increase over four years, to $133,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1997
A third striking pilot on Monday returned to work at the Port of Los Angeles as the job action entered its fourth week with no further negotiations scheduled. With three of the pilots back on the job and a pair of pilot supervisors helping guide vessels in and out of the harbor, port officials say they are hardly feeling the impact of the strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles city officials and striking port pilots exchanged new offers Sunday in closed-door contract talks, but by late evening, the two sides had not reached an accord. "We're just going back and forth with ideas," said City Administrative Officer Keith Comrie. "There's progress being made." "It's been businesslike," said pilot and union negotiator Will Baumann, of negotiations that lasted through the weekend at the San Pedro Hilton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
As the strike by Los Angeles' port pilots stretched into its 11th week, the City Council on Tuesday moved to block the Harbor Department from hiring any new port pilots until the job action ends. Councilman Rudy Svorinich Jr., whose district includes San Pedro, where the port is located, said the department had good intentions when it advertised to fill two vacancies earlier this year. But unions in the harbor area would not look kindly on interviewing pilot applicants, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1997
Other waterfront unions pledged support for striking port pilots Friday as city officials rejected the strikers' latest contract proposal, an attorney said. The pilots lowered their salary request from $195,000 a year to the $160,000 range, but city officials "indicated they were not interested," said union attorney Beth Garfield. As the labor dispute reached its 64th day, three International Longshore and Warehouse Union locals pledged $120,000 in financial assistance to the 10 striking pilots.
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