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Strikes North Korea

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991
North Korea continues to stall on the crucial issue of opening its nuclear facilities to international inspection, adding to well-founded anxieties that it is rushing to develop nuclear weapons. Hints have already come from South Korea and the United States that this prospect, with its implicit threat to stability in Northeast Asia, won't be passively accepted. The Pentagon has taken the unusual step of letting it be known that contingency plans for a military strike are being drawn up.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991
North Korea continues to stall on the crucial issue of opening its nuclear facilities to international inspection, adding to well-founded anxieties that it is rushing to develop nuclear weapons. Hints have already come from South Korea and the United States that this prospect, with its implicit threat to stability in Northeast Asia, won't be passively accepted. The Pentagon has taken the unusual step of letting it be known that contingency plans for a military strike are being drawn up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997
Seldom does an article in Opinion provoke me to lose my composure, but Michael Kazin's "In the Search for Greatness, Is Eisenhower the Answer?" (Feb. 9) almost caused me to lose my cherished Sunday morning cup of coffee. Harry Truman did great things but was not tested by a major war or national crisis? Truman's seven years were distinguished by horrendous, almost daily crises the likes of which would have annihilated most succeeding presidents. Ending World War II; to drop the bomb; should Russia come into the Pacific War; Europe in a state of total collapse; the conversion of a wartime economy; millions of returning GIs; the extension of price controls; coal, steel and railroad strikes; North Korea invades South Korea; Russia's constant violations of the Yalta pact; an insubordinate Gen. MacArthur; McCarthyism; the list is endless.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2006 | Greg Miller and Julian Barnes, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's nominee to be the next Defense secretary once urged missile strikes on North Korea to keep the communist country from acquiring nuclear weapons. But within weeks, Robert M. Gates recommended a radically different approach on Iran, urging talks instead of threats to get the Islamic regime to relinquish its nuclear program. He has consistently defended the decision to leave Saddam Hussein in power after the 1991 Persian Gulf War.
WORLD
May 27, 2003 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
When the U.S. military tries to explain the difficulty of using force to stop North Korea's development of nuclear weapons, the oddly poetic phrase it turns to is the "tyranny of proximity." The phrase, which has been in the lexicon of the U.S. forces in South Korea for years, stems from the imposing array of conventional artillery that the North Koreans have dug into the hills just north of the demilitarized zone, a mere 30 miles from this capital city of 12 million.
WORLD
December 14, 2002 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
An impoverished totalitarian regime. A reclusive leader who wields power through a cult of personality. Surreptitious plots to develop weapons of mass destruction. A penchant for blustery rhetoric and a distaste for international arms inspectors. While the world has been fixated on Iraq, a hemisphere away, North Korea is presenting an uncannily parallel dilemma.
WORLD
March 29, 2004 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
After years of slogging through her English lessons, stumbling over impossible pronunciations and baffling rules of syntax, Chae Chang Eun came up with a better idea. The 33-year-old science teacher switched to Chinese. It wasn't that the language was easier. But studying Chinese felt like a homecoming, a return to a culture and way of thinking closer to Chae's roots as a South Korean.
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