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Strikes Ohio

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BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
About 3,000 workers went on strike Tuesday at two General Motors Corp. factories that supply brakes to nearly all the company's assembly plants, threatening to disrupt production at the No. 1 auto maker. Members of the United Auto Workers cited job security and worker safety concerns in walking off the job at the two Delphi Chassis System plants in Dayton. The plants produce parts used on nearly all GM cars and trucks. Tom Klipstine, a GM spokesman in Warren, Mich.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. has laid off 175,000 hourly workers as a result of a brake factory strike in Dayton, Ohio, but not the 7,300 union workers at its Saturn plant in Spring Hill, Tenn. Even though Saturn has been forced to stop building cars because of a shortage of brake parts, its unique labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union has kept its work force busy on job training, plant maintenance and future product planning. "We would like to be making cars.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little sign of progress Wednesday in a nine-day strike that has crippled General Motors Corp.'s car and truck production and put more than 80,000 workers on the street, the dispute points to a toughened company ready to pay a heavy price to get its way. The United Auto Workers Union has struck GM eight times in the last two years.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The local strike that has crippled General Motors Corp.'s operations has turned into a monumental test of wills involving men new to their jobs and not given to backing down. GM's most public face in the dispute has been Harry Pearce, a steely-eyed lawyer who in January became the company's vice chairman. He takes a hard-edged approach to cost cutting and has the backing of some of GM's most influential board members, including director and former Chairman John Smale.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM, UAW Reach Tentative Agreement: Union and management negotiators have reached a tentative agreement that could end the three-day strike at two Ohio brake-making plants owned by General Motors Corp. The strike by 3,000 workers at GM Delco Chassis Division plants in Dayton had begun to ripple through GM's factories, closing assembly plants in three states. The union had sought a company promise to build a new generation of brake parts in Dayton.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1996 | From Reuters
Talks to resolve the 11-day strike that has paralyzed General Motors Corp.'s North American car and truck operations resumed in earnest Friday after a week of few discussions and many plant shutdowns, GM officials said. "Our priority is to reach an equitable agreement as soon as possible so we can resume supply to our customers," said James Hagedon, a spokesman at GM's strikebound Delco Chassis Division brake plants in Dayton, Ohio.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
No end was in sight Friday to a strike by 3,000 workers at two General Motors Corp. brake factories that has idled eight other GM plants, including six plants that assemble cars and pickup trucks. A GM spokesperson said formal talks between the two sides were not scheduled for the weekend, and a union leader said he expects the strike to continue into next week. Industry watchers said the nation's No.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. has laid off 175,000 hourly workers as a result of a brake factory strike in Dayton, Ohio, but not the 7,300 union workers at its Saturn plant in Spring Hill, Tenn. Even though Saturn has been forced to stop building cars because of a shortage of brake parts, its unique labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union has kept its work force busy on job training, plant maintenance and future product planning. "We would like to be making cars.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The local strike that has crippled General Motors Corp.'s operations has turned into a monumental test of wills involving men new to their jobs and not given to backing down. GM's most public face in the dispute has been Harry Pearce, a steely-eyed lawyer who in January became the company's vice chairman. He takes a hard-edged approach to cost cutting and has the backing of some of GM's most influential board members, including director and former Chairman John Smale.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
A strike at two General Motors Corp. brake plants idled the first GM car assembly plants Thursday and threatened to slow or halt production at other operations of the nation's No. 1 auto maker. Company executives said assembly plants in Wilmington, Del., and Oshawa, Canada, were forced to cease production. The plants together employ more than 9,000 workers. GM said in a statement that the 6,500 workers at the Oshawa plant were told not to report to work until further notice.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1996 | From Reuters
Talks to resolve the 11-day strike that has paralyzed General Motors Corp.'s North American car and truck operations resumed in earnest Friday after a week of few discussions and many plant shutdowns, GM officials said. "Our priority is to reach an equitable agreement as soon as possible so we can resume supply to our customers," said James Hagedon, a spokesman at GM's strikebound Delco Chassis Division brake plants in Dayton, Ohio.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To auto assembler Patricia Boyd, the strike that has brought General Motors' vehicle production to a virtual halt nationwide is a clear signal that workers have had enough of corporate America's cold talk of downsizing, restructuring and outsourcing. "GM ought to realize this is a wake-up call," declared Boyd, a United Auto Workers member who works at the inner-city assembly plant known here as Poletown. "The unions, especially the UAW, are not going to stand to be broken.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little sign of progress Wednesday in a nine-day strike that has crippled General Motors Corp.'s car and truck production and put more than 80,000 workers on the street, the dispute points to a toughened company ready to pay a heavy price to get its way. The United Auto Workers Union has struck GM eight times in the last two years.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
No end was in sight Friday to a strike by 3,000 workers at two General Motors Corp. brake factories that has idled eight other GM plants, including six plants that assemble cars and pickup trucks. A GM spokesperson said formal talks between the two sides were not scheduled for the weekend, and a union leader said he expects the strike to continue into next week. Industry watchers said the nation's No.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
A strike at two General Motors Corp. brake plants idled the first GM car assembly plants Thursday and threatened to slow or halt production at other operations of the nation's No. 1 auto maker. Company executives said assembly plants in Wilmington, Del., and Oshawa, Canada, were forced to cease production. The plants together employ more than 9,000 workers. GM said in a statement that the 6,500 workers at the Oshawa plant were told not to report to work until further notice.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
About 3,000 workers went on strike Tuesday at two General Motors Corp. factories that supply brakes to nearly all the company's assembly plants, threatening to disrupt production at the No. 1 auto maker. Members of the United Auto Workers cited job security and worker safety concerns in walking off the job at the two Delphi Chassis System plants in Dayton. The plants produce parts used on nearly all GM cars and trucks. Tom Klipstine, a GM spokesman in Warren, Mich.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To auto assembler Patricia Boyd, the strike that has brought General Motors' vehicle production to a virtual halt nationwide is a clear signal that workers have had enough of corporate America's cold talk of downsizing, restructuring and outsourcing. "GM ought to realize this is a wake-up call," declared Boyd, a United Auto Workers member who works at the inner-city assembly plant known here as Poletown. "The unions, especially the UAW, are not going to stand to be broken.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford, UAW Face Strike Deadline: Union workers at one of two assembly lines at Ford Motor Co.'s Ohio Assembly Plant in Avon Lake threatened to strike if no new contract agreement was reached by midnight. UAW Local 2000, representing 1,900 workers on the Mercury Villager-Nissan Quest minivan production line, rejected a proposed contract March 14. Workers on the other line, which makes the Econoline full-size van, approved a separate contract in voting at the same time.
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