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Strikes Pakistan

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NEWS
February 28, 1987 | Associated Press
Afghan warplanes Friday bombed two Afghan refugee camps near the border in northwestern Pakistan, killing at least 31 people and injuring 49, Pakistani officials said. It was Afghanistan's second bombing raid across the border in two days. On Thursday, Afghan planes bombed two villages in the same region, killing 35 people and injuring 200. A government official said the bombs hit the camps of Matasanga and Khardand, 180 miles west of Islamabad, Pakistan's capital.
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WORLD
September 6, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A senior commander linked to the Taliban was among six militants reportedly killed early Friday in a suspected U.S. drone strike in northwest Pakistan along the Afghan border, according to local media and an intermediary with close links to militants. The commander, Afghan national Mullah Sangeen Zadran, has been a top leader with the Haqqani network who reportedly served as the Taliban's unofficial governor of Afghanistan's southeastern Paktika province, said the intermediary, who requested anonymity for his own security.
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WORLD
March 17, 2008 | Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King, Special to The Times
A missile strike Sunday destroyed the compound of a suspected militant leader in Pakistan's tribal belt, killing at least 18 people, officials and local residents said. The Pakistani military disavowed responsibility for the strike in the South Waziristan tribal region, raising the possibility that it was carried out by U.S. forces. American military officials in neighboring Afghanistan had no immediate comment, though U.S.
WORLD
March 15, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A top U.N. investigator has criticized Washington's drone missile campaign against Islamic militants in Pakistan as a violation of the South Asian nation's sovereignty, a stance that echoes Islamabad's public condemnations of the tactic but not one that is expected to end U.S. airstrikes. Ben Emmerson, U.N. special rapporteur on counter-terrorism and human rights, issued a statement Friday saying the U.S. drone campaign “involves the use of force on the territory of another state without its consent, and is therefore a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty.” “Pakistan has also been quite clear that it considers the drone campaign to be counter-productive and to be radicalizing a whole new generation,” Emmerson added, “thereby perpetuating the problem of terrorism in the region.” Emmerson's remarks came after he made a three-day visit to Pakistan last week, meeting with top Pakistani officials as well as tribal elders and victims of drone strikes.
WORLD
January 9, 2009 | Greg Miller
Two senior Al Qaeda operatives were killed in a CIA missile strike on New Year's Day in Pakistan, including a suspect in the bombing of Islamabad's Marriott Hotel in September, a senior U.S. counter-terrorism official said Thursday. The two operatives were also suspects in the deadly 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa for which they had been indicted in the United States, the official said.
WORLD
September 28, 2010 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. has stepped up drone strikes and other military operations inside Pakistan after concluding that Islamabad does not intend to crack down against Afghan insurgents along its border, U.S. officials said. There have been more than 20 strikes by CIA-operated drones since Sept. 1, counter-terrorism officials said, the highest monthly total in the nearly nine years since the U.S. began carrying out such attacks. The focus of the recent U.S. operations has been the Haqqani group, a violent Afghan insurgent organization that has long used the North Waziristan tribal area, just inside Pakistan's border, as a base of operations.
WORLD
March 15, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - A top U.N. investigator has criticized Washington's drone missile campaign against Islamic militants in Pakistan as a violation of the South Asian nation's sovereignty, a stance that echoes Islamabad's public condemnations of the tactic but not one that is expected to end U.S. airstrikes. Ben Emmerson, U.N. special rapporteur on counter-terrorism and human rights, issued a statement Friday saying the U.S. drone campaign “involves the use of force on the territory of another state without its consent, and is therefore a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty.” “Pakistan has also been quite clear that it considers the drone campaign to be counter-productive and to be radicalizing a whole new generation,” Emmerson added, “thereby perpetuating the problem of terrorism in the region.” Emmerson's remarks came after he made a three-day visit to Pakistan last week, meeting with top Pakistani officials as well as tribal elders and victims of drone strikes.
WORLD
September 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Far more civilians have been killed by U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas than U.S. counter-terrorism officials have acknowledged, a new study by human rights researchers at Stanford University and New York University contends. The report, "Living Under Drones," also concludes that the classified CIA program has not made America any safer and instead has turned the Pakistani public against U.S. policy in the volatile region. It recommends that the Obama administration reevaluate the program to make it more transparent and accountable, and to prove compliance with international law. "Real people are suffering real harm" but are largely ignored in government or news media discussions of drone attacks, said James Cavallaro of Stanford, one of the study's authors.
WORLD
September 6, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan -- A senior commander linked to the Taliban was among six militants reportedly killed early Friday in a suspected U.S. drone strike in northwest Pakistan along the Afghan border, according to local media and an intermediary with close links to militants. The commander, Afghan national Mullah Sangeen Zadran, has been a top leader with the Haqqani network who reportedly served as the Taliban's unofficial governor of Afghanistan's southeastern Paktika province, said the intermediary, who requested anonymity for his own security.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
President Obama offered a vigorous defense of using unmanned aircraft to kill Al Qaeda operatives and other militants in Pakistan's tribal areas and, in the process, officially acknowledged the highly classified CIA drone program that U.S. officials had refused to discuss in public until now. "I think that we have to be judicious in how we use drones," Obama said Monday, adding that they have been used for "very precise, precision strikes against...
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Recent U.S. drone missile strikes in northwest Pakistan have killed two Al Qaeda commanders, according to Pakistani intelligence sources, including a militant leader who had replaced Al Qaeda's second-in-command, Abu Yahya al Libi, killed by a drone missile this summer. The sources said Sunday that Abu Zaid al Kuwaiti, a senior Al Qaeda leader who had replaced Al Libi, was killed in a drone strike Thursday near the town of Mir Ali in North Waziristan, the tribal region along the Afghan border that has long served as a stronghold for an array of militant groups, including Al Qaeda commanders, the Afghan Taliban wing known as the Haqqani network, and the Pakistani Taliban.
WORLD
September 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Far more civilians have been killed by U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas than U.S. counter-terrorism officials have acknowledged, a new study by human rights researchers at Stanford University and New York University contends. The report, "Living Under Drones," also concludes that the classified CIA program has not made America any safer and instead has turned the Pakistani public against U.S. policy in the volatile region. It recommends that the Obama administration reevaluate the program to make it more transparent and accountable, and to prove compliance with international law. "Real people are suffering real harm" but are largely ignored in government or news media discussions of drone attacks, said James Cavallaro of Stanford, one of the study's authors.
WORLD
June 8, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Expressing both public and private frustration with Pakistan, the Obama administration has unleashed the CIA to resume an aggressive campaign of drone strikes in Pakistani territory over the last few weeks, approving strikes that might have been vetoed in the past for fear of angering Islamabad. Now, said a senior U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity in discussing sensitive issues, the administration's attitude is, "What do we have to lose?" Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta made clear the deteriorating relations with Islamabad on Thursday, saying the United States is "reaching the limits of our patience" because Pakistan has not cracked down on local insurgents who carry out deadly attacks on U.S. troops and others in neighboring Afghanistan.
WORLD
April 30, 2012 | By Brian Bennett and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama's top counter-terrorism advisor Monday defended using drones to launch missiles against militants in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, saying the growing use of armed unmanned aircraft had saved American lives and caused few civilian casualties. The comments by John Brennan, coming shortly before the first anniversary of the U.S. Navy SEAL raid that killed Osama bin Laden, marks the first time a senior White House official has spoken at length in public about widely reported but officially secret drone operations.
WORLD
February 10, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
An apparent U.S. drone strike early Thursday in northwest Pakistan killed a top Pakistani Taliban commander also serving as a key Al Qaeda operative, local officials said. The death of Badar Mansoor, 35, comes as the United States steps up its pace of drone missile attacks following a six-week hiatus after an airstrike accidentally killed Pakistani soldiers near the Afghan border in November. Thursday's predawn strike occurred in North Waziristan, the volatile tribal region that serves as a sanctuary for several militant groups, including the Pakistani Taliban and the wing of the Afghan Taliban known as the Haqqani network.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
President Obama offered a vigorous defense of using unmanned aircraft to kill Al Qaeda operatives and other militants in Pakistan's tribal areas and, in the process, officially acknowledged the highly classified CIA drone program that U.S. officials had refused to discuss in public until now. "I think that we have to be judicious in how we use drones," Obama said Monday, adding that they have been used for "very precise, precision strikes against...
WORLD
December 28, 2010 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King
Missiles presumably fired by U.S. drones on Monday incinerated three trucks thought to be ferrying fighters and weapons from Pakistan's tribal borderlands to Afghanistan. The strikes killed 25 suspected militants and injured four, Pakistani intelligence officials said. A campaign of American drone strikes against militants in the tribal areas has dramatically accelerated this year, targeting members of groups including the Taliban, an offshoot organization known as the Haqqani network, and Al Qaeda.
WORLD
November 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Allegations that a NATO attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers near the Afghan border Saturday dealt a serious blow to already tense relations between Washington and Islamabad at a time when the U.S. needs Pakistan's cooperation in engineering a peaceful resolution to the 10-year war in Afghanistan. If confirmed, the NATO helicopter and fighter jet attack would be the deadliest ever involving Pakistani security forces. In response, Pakistan shut down crucial border crossings used by convoys delivering supplies to NATO forces in Afghanistan and gave the U.S. 15 days to vacate an air base in southern Pakistan that in the past had been suspected as a launchpad for CIA drone attacks.
WORLD
November 7, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The White House over the summer put new restrictions on CIA drone strikes in the wake of concerns that the program was primarily targeting lower-level militants while provoking anger in Pakistan, U.S. officials said. Since then, according to an independent analysis, the strikes have yielded a significant increase in the percentage of people killed whom the government considers "high-value targets. " But the program is still killing mainly rank-and-file fighters, the study indicates.
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