Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrikes Russia
IN THE NEWS

Strikes Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | Associated Press
More than 1 million Russian and Ukrainian coal miners went on strike Thursday in a wave of anger that could lead to budgetary chaos and affect Russia's presidential election campaign. From Ukraine's coal-rich Donbass region to eastern Siberia, miners were demanding hundreds of millions of dollars in unpaid wages and protesting government neglect of state-owned mines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
President Vladimir V. Putin and the most radical of Chechnya's separatist rebel leaders issued threats Friday that appeared to signal a deepening of their struggle. Chechen guerrilla leader Shamil Basayev issued a statement in which he took responsibility for recent terrorist attacks, coldly listed how much they cost, and tried to justify the most recent one -- a bloody school takeover in the southern Russian town of Beslan -- by comparing it to the U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Some of the coal miners on strike in Russia's Far East started receiving back pay but pressed on with their more than 3-week-old protest, Itar-Tass news agency said. About 10,000 miners are on strike in a region of 2.2 million people. Miners unions are due to meet Tuesday to consider a nationwide stoppage. President Boris N. Yeltsin has launched an inquiry into the crisis, and the government has started sending cash to ease the miners' plight.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin reacted with outspoken anger Friday to news of U.S. missile strikes in Afghanistan and Sudan, but Russian officials said that his denunciations will not affect a summit meeting with President Clinton due to take place in Moscow in September. "My attitude is negative, as it would be to any act of terrorism, military interference or failure to solve a problem through negotiations," Yeltsin said. "Therefore, I am outraged, and I deplore this act."
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | Associated Press
Doctors and ambulance medics staged warning strikes across Russia on Thursday and were threatening a full-scale protest against low wages, decrepit equipment and a shortage of medicine. The strikes stem from a general collapse of the medical system as Russia struggles to move from a centrally planned to a market economy. Russians, who for decades have been given free medical care, may now be forced to pay, and few have the money to spare.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a long-ago nightmare, the war in Chechnya had faded from most Russians' list of worries when a bizarre reminder emerged from beneath the snow and leaves of Moscow's Izmailovsky Park. There, in the desolate spot where a Chechen separatist commander had instructed them to look, a camera crew from Russia's NTV television dug up a small container of radioactive cesium-137 wrapped in a yellow shopping bag.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Demanding huge pay raises, air-traffic controllers called for a nationwide strike Saturday and succeeded in crippling three major airports, but they suspended the walkout after Russia's vice president threatened them with arrest. Strikers claimed to have temporarily shut down up to 47 airfields, but by evening, news reports indicated that only three--Pulkovo Airport in St. Petersburg and the airports in Samara and Ekaterinburg--were still idled.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin reacted with outspoken anger Friday to news of U.S. missile strikes in Afghanistan and Sudan, but Russian officials said that his denunciations will not affect a summit meeting with President Clinton due to take place in Moscow in September. "My attitude is negative, as it would be to any act of terrorism, military interference or failure to solve a problem through negotiations," Yeltsin said. "Therefore, I am outraged, and I deplore this act."
WORLD
September 18, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
President Vladimir V. Putin and the most radical of Chechnya's separatist rebel leaders issued threats Friday that appeared to signal a deepening of their struggle. Chechen guerrilla leader Shamil Basayev issued a statement in which he took responsibility for recent terrorist attacks, coldly listed how much they cost, and tried to justify the most recent one -- a bloody school takeover in the southern Russian town of Beslan -- by comparing it to the U.S.
WORLD
November 24, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chechen warlord who says he was behind last month's mass hostage-taking in Moscow warned that his group would launch new strikes in Russia if Moscow does not pull its troops out of his breakaway republic. Shamil Basayev told NATO leaders in an open letter they should press Moscow to exit Chechnya and start peace talks. "We are ... warning that all military, industrial and strategic facilities on the territory of Russia are legitimate military targets for us," the letter said.
NEWS
August 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Some of the coal miners on strike in Russia's Far East started receiving back pay but pressed on with their more than 3-week-old protest, Itar-Tass news agency said. About 10,000 miners are on strike in a region of 2.2 million people. Miners unions are due to meet Tuesday to consider a nationwide stoppage. President Boris N. Yeltsin has launched an inquiry into the crisis, and the government has started sending cash to ease the miners' plight.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | Associated Press
More than 1 million Russian and Ukrainian coal miners went on strike Thursday in a wave of anger that could lead to budgetary chaos and affect Russia's presidential election campaign. From Ukraine's coal-rich Donbass region to eastern Siberia, miners were demanding hundreds of millions of dollars in unpaid wages and protesting government neglect of state-owned mines.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a long-ago nightmare, the war in Chechnya had faded from most Russians' list of worries when a bizarre reminder emerged from beneath the snow and leaves of Moscow's Izmailovsky Park. There, in the desolate spot where a Chechen separatist commander had instructed them to look, a camera crew from Russia's NTV television dug up a small container of radioactive cesium-137 wrapped in a yellow shopping bag.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Demanding huge pay raises, air-traffic controllers called for a nationwide strike Saturday and succeeded in crippling three major airports, but they suspended the walkout after Russia's vice president threatened them with arrest. Strikers claimed to have temporarily shut down up to 47 airfields, but by evening, news reports indicated that only three--Pulkovo Airport in St. Petersburg and the airports in Samara and Ekaterinburg--were still idled.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | Associated Press
Doctors and ambulance medics staged warning strikes across Russia on Thursday and were threatening a full-scale protest against low wages, decrepit equipment and a shortage of medicine. The strikes stem from a general collapse of the medical system as Russia struggles to move from a centrally planned to a market economy. Russians, who for decades have been given free medical care, may now be forced to pay, and few have the money to spare.
WORLD
September 26, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said he did not come to a NATO meeting here to drum up support for a potential war with Iraq but that it came unsolicited anyway. Those giving their quiet backing Wednesday, however, did not appear to include representatives of Germany or France, who have expressed reservations.
WORLD
January 30, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Two suicide bombers whose attacks last month in Volgograd raised fears of terrorist strikes in Russia during the coming Olympic Games have been identified and two accomplices arrested, authorities said Thursday. The two bombers struck the Volgograd's railroad station Dec. 29 and a crowded trolley bus the next day, killing 34 people in all. The city is about 400 miles northeast of Sochi, site of the Games, and near the Caucasus region, which has long been a battleground between Islamist militants and security forces.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|