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Strikes South Korea

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NEWS
January 7, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With organized labor and the government in Seoul moving toward a showdown over a controversial new labor law, analysts say the next few days will be crucial in determining whether strikes threatening South Korea's economy will spread or fade away. South Korean President Kim Young Sam today bluntly rejected strikers' demands to scrap the law, which gives employers new powers to lay off workers.
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NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama will call South Korea's president later Tuesday to express America's solidarity after a military strike from North Korea, the White House said. Briefing reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Indiana, deputy press secretary Bill Burton said Obama learned of the strike at 3:55 a.m., in a phone call from incoming National Security Adviser Tom Donilon. He called North Korea's action part of a "pattern of doing things that are provocative. " "The president is outraged by this action.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 1998 | Associated Press
Riot police stormed plants of South Korea's largest auto parts maker to break up an 18-day-old strike by thousands of workers protesting layoffs. In coordinated dawn assaults at seven Mando Machinery Corp. plants around the country, some 8,000 riot police used bulldozers and tear gas to break through barricades and disperse strikers. MBC-TV said one worker was taken to a hospital after falling from a fourth-floor building in an apparent suicide attempt. His condition was not immediately known.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Hyundai Motor Co., South Korea's largest automaker, may lose production of about 6,000 of its Sonata sedans, Santa Fe sport utility vehicles and other vehicles because of a three-day strike that its workers started Wednesday. The auto workers are asking for an 11% pay increase, or $105 more a month, a 40-hour workweek and other benefits. Workers at Kia Motors Corp., an affiliate of Hyundai Motor, and Ssangyong Motor Co., South Korea's No. 4 automaker, also went on strike.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
The chairman of South Korea's ruling party made a visit today to a Seoul cathedral where union leaders are being sheltered from arrest as they plot the biggest strike in the nation's history. But Lee Hong Koo was turned away by heads of the outlawed Korean Confederation of Trade Unions. Instead, he met the Roman Catholic cardinal of South Korea and was given a lecture on worker welfare. "Get out! Get out!"
BUSINESS
August 24, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boston Bank's Seoul Branch Locks Out Strikers: Union workers at Boston-based First National Bank had been on partial strike since July 12, after they failed to reach an agreement in wage negotiations with management. Officials at the bank said 31 of 54 employees are union members, but they refused to give further details on the lockout. An official who represents labor unions for foreign banks said the union demanded a 24% wage increase when the strike began; management offered an 8.5%
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Kim Young Sam agreed to meet opposition leaders to try to resolve the labor unrest that has idled the country's key industries for more than three weeks. The president's office announced the concession today as tens of thousands of union members returned to work. Hundreds of militant students battled police on Sunday with firebombs, rocks and tear gas, hours after a union leader urged an end to protest violence.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of South Korea appeared to win a significant victory Tuesday in its labor reform efforts when one of the country's largest and traditionally most aggressive labor groups called off a threatened nationwide strike. The move is expected to cripple, at least in the short term, the momentum of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, which represents about 600,000 workers.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean workers launched the largest organized labor strike in their history today, threatening to hamper transportation, manufacturing and financial services in the worst political crisis of President Kim Young Sam's administration. It is the first joint national strike by South Korea's two major trade federations, and the action's leaders estimated that about 610,000 workers had walked off the job as the country's raging labor strife entered its third week.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Hyundai Motor Co., South Korea's largest automaker, may lose production of about 6,000 of its Sonata sedans, Santa Fe sport utility vehicles and other vehicles because of a three-day strike that its workers started Wednesday. The auto workers are asking for an 11% pay increase, or $105 more a month, a 40-hour workweek and other benefits. Workers at Kia Motors Corp., an affiliate of Hyundai Motor, and Ssangyong Motor Co., South Korea's No. 4 automaker, also went on strike.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of South Korea appeared to win a significant victory Tuesday in its labor reform efforts when one of the country's largest and traditionally most aggressive labor groups called off a threatened nationwide strike. The move is expected to cripple, at least in the short term, the momentum of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, which represents about 600,000 workers.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1998 | Associated Press
Riot police stormed plants of South Korea's largest auto parts maker to break up an 18-day-old strike by thousands of workers protesting layoffs. In coordinated dawn assaults at seven Mando Machinery Corp. plants around the country, some 8,000 riot police used bulldozers and tear gas to break through barricades and disperse strikers. MBC-TV said one worker was taken to a hospital after falling from a fourth-floor building in an apparent suicide attempt. His condition was not immediately known.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Kim Young Sam agreed to meet opposition leaders to try to resolve the labor unrest that has idled the country's key industries for more than three weeks. The president's office announced the concession today as tens of thousands of union members returned to work. Hundreds of militant students battled police on Sunday with firebombs, rocks and tear gas, hours after a union leader urged an end to protest violence.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean workers launched the largest organized labor strike in their history today, threatening to hamper transportation, manufacturing and financial services in the worst political crisis of President Kim Young Sam's administration. It is the first joint national strike by South Korea's two major trade federations, and the action's leaders estimated that about 610,000 workers had walked off the job as the country's raging labor strife entered its third week.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
The chairman of South Korea's ruling party made a visit today to a Seoul cathedral where union leaders are being sheltered from arrest as they plot the biggest strike in the nation's history. But Lee Hong Koo was turned away by heads of the outlawed Korean Confederation of Trade Unions. Instead, he met the Roman Catholic cardinal of South Korea and was given a lecture on worker welfare. "Get out! Get out!"
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With organized labor and the government in Seoul moving toward a showdown over a controversial new labor law, analysts say the next few days will be crucial in determining whether strikes threatening South Korea's economy will spread or fade away. South Korean President Kim Young Sam today bluntly rejected strikers' demands to scrap the law, which gives employers new powers to lay off workers.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama will call South Korea's president later Tuesday to express America's solidarity after a military strike from North Korea, the White House said. Briefing reporters aboard Air Force One en route to Indiana, deputy press secretary Bill Burton said Obama learned of the strike at 3:55 a.m., in a phone call from incoming National Security Adviser Tom Donilon. He called North Korea's action part of a "pattern of doing things that are provocative. " "The president is outraged by this action.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
Communist North Korea sent patrol boats across a disputed sea border Saturday after threatening to attack South Korean warships in contested waters of the Yellow Sea. The American-led U.N. Command, which oversees the fragile truce between the two bitter rivals, urged North Korea on Saturday--for a third time in a week--to hold a border military meeting to end the standoff. "It's in everyone's interest to reduce tensions," said command spokesman Col. Carl Kropf.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Boston Bank's Seoul Branch Locks Out Strikers: Union workers at Boston-based First National Bank had been on partial strike since July 12, after they failed to reach an agreement in wage negotiations with management. Officials at the bank said 31 of 54 employees are union members, but they refused to give further details on the lockout. An official who represents labor unions for foreign banks said the union demanded a 24% wage increase when the strike began; management offered an 8.5%
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