Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrikes United States
IN THE NEWS

Strikes United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
"I made two bad mistakes in life," Phil Miller says. "I went to Vietnam and I walked away from a job that I loved." Miller, a 43-year-old Air Force veteran, is doing fine these days as a Boston defense consultant. But the job that he walked away from still haunts him like a stormy romance he wishes he'd never broken off. As a younger man, Miller was part of a national fraternity of professionals who prided themselves on their unique ability to bring order out of chaos.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2001
War has just been declared by the enemies of our country. We must exterminate them immediately. We know who they are and where they are. It is time to unleash our terrible might and destroy the enemies of peace, wherever they are, on this Earth. I am, of course, referring to all the terrorist organizations whose insanity continues to plague us all. I'm sure our secret government organizations know where most of these people are. We take them out. Now. Jim Pappas Torrance I watched the World Trade Center towers fall down Tuesday morning while I got ready for school.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO and JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the island town of Avalon, the UPS strike almost halted the local newspaper's flawless 83-year record of punctual delivery. In Los Angeles, a truck mechanic can't get to three broken-down buses and a Mack truck because his technical manuals are lost somewhere en route. In Hollywood, an 18-year-old woman can't get a Hebrew religious book she needs before she heads off to study at a university in Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO and JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the island town of Avalon, the UPS strike almost halted the local newspaper's flawless 83-year record of punctual delivery. In Los Angeles, a truck mechanic can't get to three broken-down buses and a Mack truck because his technical manuals are lost somewhere en route. In Hollywood, an 18-year-old woman can't get a Hebrew religious book she needs before she heads off to study at a university in Israel.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To New York sports agent Lou Oppenheim, the names of the divisions say it all. In major league baseball, basketball and football, the teams are grouped into geographic divisions called East, West, Central, Pacific and so on. But in the National Hockey League, there are such names as the Campbell Conference, after a revered former league president, and the Smythe Division, after the late owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steelmaker Hit by Strike: About 4,000 members of the United Steelworkers of America walked off their jobs at Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp. plants in three states. It was the company's second labor dispute in nine years. Union negotiators said pensions, medical benefits, salaries and retiree insurance were some of the sticking points. Wheeling-Pittsburgh, based in Wheeling, W. Va., is the nation's eighth-largest company producing steel from scratch.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1997
Contingency plans implemented by United Parcel Service's competitors were in full swing Monday as shippers braced for increased volume from the day-old UPS strike. UPS' competitors are significantly smaller than the nation's largest shipping company, making long lines and delivery delays likely. A look at some of the alternative companies and their responses to the strike and the volumes they typically handle: * U.S.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Teamsters President Ron Carey threatened Thursday to walk out of new talks with United Parcel Service of America Inc. if he sees no progress, and UPS Chairman James Kelly repeated a call for union members to vote on the latest company proposal. The two men, reiterating their positions of the last few days, spoke as they resumed negotiations in Washington to see whether they could end the 4-day-old Teamsters strike against UPS, the nation's largest freight carrier.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Day 1 of the strike by major league baseball players Friday, negotiators for the players and owners agreed to federal mediation in their stalemated collective bargaining talks. Neither side seemed optimistic, however, that their dispute could be easily resolved by outside assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1997 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 11-day nationwide strike that has virtually paralyzed UPS heated up in Los Angeles on Thursday when a small group of delivery employees denounced their union's actions, while Teamsters officials dismissed the news conference as a public relations ploy staged by the delivery company. "I have lost confidence in those who represent me," said Frank Ontiveros, a San Marcos package driver expressing his frustration with the union's stand.
NEWS
August 11, 1997 | From Associated Press
Coping with increased volume from the UPS strike, the post office began seven-day-a-week package deliveries Sunday in some metropolitan areas. "The Postal Service is now delivering dramatically increased volumes of mail that rival those we experience during the Christmas period," said Nicholas Barranca, U.S. Postal Service vice president, in a statement. The post office already has Sunday deliveries of guaranteed overnight Express Mail, which continue.
NEWS
August 11, 1997 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Teamsters strike against United Parcel Service moving into its second week and negotiations at a standstill, Labor Secretary Alexis M. Herman said Sunday that she will personally ask leaders on both sides what it would take to bring them back to the bargaining table. "We're digging in to urge the Teamsters, to urge UPS, to show a willingness to compromise. We want them to show greater flexibility," Herman said on NBC-TV's "Meet the Press."
BUSINESS
August 8, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Teamsters President Ron Carey threatened Thursday to walk out of new talks with United Parcel Service of America Inc. if he sees no progress, and UPS Chairman James Kelly repeated a call for union members to vote on the latest company proposal. The two men, reiterating their positions of the last few days, spoke as they resumed negotiations in Washington to see whether they could end the 4-day-old Teamsters strike against UPS, the nation's largest freight carrier.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Monday, Alan Thornton, manager of Odyssey Video in West Los Angeles, will meet his sales rep near the offramp at the intersection of the 405 and 101 freeways. His mission: to pick up the latest video releases, including "The Devil's Own" and "Mother," which would normally be shipped to him via United Parcel Service of America Inc. "It's like we're going out to do a drug deal by the offramp," said Odyssey owner Steven Gabor. "It's ridiculous."
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether they make Beanie Babies, refrigerator magnets or cuckoo clocks, nearly all of the 1,700 exhibitors at the International Gift Fair had one painful thing in common this week: They ship their products via United Parcel Service. So if UPS wanted a glimpse of how the strike is disrupting business in even the most frivolous sectors of the economy, San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center was a perfect place to start.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1993 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a financial blow that was worse than many had expected, American Airlines on Tuesday said last month's crippling flight attendants strike will slash after-tax profit by more than $160 million--far above management's initial estimates. The Ft. Worth-based carrier said it lost 1.3 million passengers--many to rival carriers--when the five-day strike left it without enough qualified flight attendants to operate normally. Less than 50% of American's flights carried passengers during the walkout.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997
Information on delivery services during the UPS strike. * Local post offices are limiting parcels to four per customer per visit unless an appointment has been arranged. For more information, call (800) 485-8727 or visit the Postal Service's Web site at http://www.usps.gov * Federal Express, RPS and Airborne Express are not accepting new customers. Money-back guarantees for on-time service are suspended in most cases.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|