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Strikes Ussr

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NEWS
April 29, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the tens of thousands of Soviet coal miners who left their pits almost two months ago, defiantly demanding the resignation of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, have given up on a strike that has made their families a bit poorer but achieved little. "In the Donbass there's a wave of mines going back to work," said Viktor Osovsky, a member of the strike committee in the Donetsk Basin of the Ukraine. "We all expected much more to come out of the strike."
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NEWS
April 29, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the tens of thousands of Soviet coal miners who left their pits almost two months ago, defiantly demanding the resignation of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, have given up on a strike that has made their families a bit poorer but achieved little. "In the Donbass there's a wave of mines going back to work," said Viktor Osovsky, a member of the strike committee in the Donetsk Basin of the Ukraine. "We all expected much more to come out of the strike."
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NEWS
April 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet miners threatened Sunday to flood their coal pits as a desperate next step in the month-old strike that has crippled parts of the country's heavy industry and cost the economy millions of tons of coal. The threat to flood the mines--which could put them out of commission for months if not permanently--appeared calculated to force the Soviet government to abandon its hard line on the miners and consider making concessions.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Detailed figures released by the Soviet state statistics committee Goskomstat confirmed that spreading strikes and unrest are crippling the country's economy. In the first three months of 1991, compared to 1990, gross national product fell 8%, productivity dropped 9% and foreign trade slumped by a third. Meanwhile, thousands of factory workers, outraged by steep price hikes which took effect April 2, have stopped work to back a six-week-old protest by 300,000 coal miners.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Detailed figures released by the Soviet state statistics committee Goskomstat confirmed that spreading strikes and unrest are crippling the country's economy. In the first three months of 1991, compared to 1990, gross national product fell 8%, productivity dropped 9% and foreign trade slumped by a third. Meanwhile, thousands of factory workers, outraged by steep price hikes which took effect April 2, have stopped work to back a six-week-old protest by 300,000 coal miners.
BOOKS
October 6, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
What a very strange place the world is these days. At once the planet is shrinking, thanks to technology that enables us to speak instantaneously with people in obscure villages in Tibet or Tanzania, and exploding, as political boundaries shift or even disappear entirely.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet miners threatened Sunday to flood their coal pits as a desperate next step in the month-old strike that has crippled parts of the country's heavy industry and cost the economy millions of tons of coal. The threat to flood the mines--which could put them out of commission for months if not permanently--appeared calculated to force the Soviet government to abandon its hard line on the miners and consider making concessions.
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