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String Theory

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011
String Theory Where: Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday Price: a few tickets available at $47 and $60 Info: (310) 434-3200; http://www.thebroadstage.com
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Science, which is confusing to many people — some to the point that they regard it as a form of superstition — has always needed its champions, its spokespersons, its interpreters, big brains who also function efficiently as celebrities and have a knack for taking impossible-sounding theories and making them sound, at least for the moment they're speaking, comprehensible. Here comes Brian Greene, again. (He is TV's favorite theoretical physicist.) Like Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking before him, Greene — whose "The Fabric of the Cosmos" begins a four-week run Wednesday in the framework of the PBS series "Nova" — is both mediagenic and a working scientist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
String Theory, a Los Angeles-based hybrid performance act that combines dance and a kind of sonic sculpture, has little to do with the field of particle physics that gives it its name. However, the two disparate entities do have one striking thing in common ? most people have no idea how to explain either one. There's no "one-liner elevator speech," as one of its dancers put it. "It just is," said another. Even Dale Franzen, artistic director of the Broad Stage in Santa Monica, can't quite categorize the root genre of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011
String Theory Where: Broad Stage, 1310 11th St., Santa Monica When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday Price: a few tickets available at $47 and $60 Info: (310) 434-3200; http://www.thebroadstage.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Science, which is confusing to many people — some to the point that they regard it as a form of superstition — has always needed its champions, its spokespersons, its interpreters, big brains who also function efficiently as celebrities and have a knack for taking impossible-sounding theories and making them sound, at least for the moment they're speaking, comprehensible. Here comes Brian Greene, again. (He is TV's favorite theoretical physicist.) Like Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking before him, Greene — whose "The Fabric of the Cosmos" begins a four-week run Wednesday in the framework of the PBS series "Nova" — is both mediagenic and a working scientist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2000
Theoretical physics is perhaps the most abstruse field in science. Its most rarefied subfield is called string theory, a mathematical framework based on the notion that matter is made not of individual particles but rather of tiny, vibrating string-like loops. The scientists now constructing string theories, like Columbia University professor Brian Greene, are clearly more capable of abstraction than most of us; by age 5, Greene was multiplying 30-digit numbers.
BOOKS
January 15, 2006 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer for Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
LEONARD SUSSKIND was a plumber before he reinvented himself as a physicist, a fact that may explain why he is inspired to write about the eye-crossing and mind-boggling complexities of modern science in language that a layperson can understand. In "The Cosmic Landscape," he offers nothing less than an insider's guided tour of theoretical physics over the last century or so, moving from Albert Einstein's theory of relativity to Susskind's own cutting-edge scientific theories.
BOOKS
October 8, 2006 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole, who teaches science journalism at USC's Annenberg School, is the author of "The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty."
The Trouble With Physics The Rise of String Theory, the Fall of a Science, and What Comes Next Lee Smolin Houghton Mifflin: 392 pp., $26 IN physics, truth and beauty often walk hand in hand. Physicists describe theories as "ugly" or "beautiful," talk about ideas that "smell" or "feel" right. Often, aesthetic judgments lead to discoveries: as in Einstein's theory of gravity and Paul A.M. Dirac's discovery of antimatter.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's not every day that a revolution in physics is announced by a ranting and raving guy who gets carried off by two men in white coats. Yet that's more or less what happened to Caltech physicist John Schwarz in the summer of 1984. To be fair, the ravings were a prearranged part of a physics "cabaret" put on as pure entertainment at the Aspen Center for Physics in Colorado.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A physicist from UC Santa Barbara has taken what scientists are calling a major step toward finding a long-sought unified theory of nature. If it works, such a theory would explain everything from subatomic particles to supernovas as different aspects of the same fundamental stuff. "It's a major development," said Edward Witten of Princeton's Institute for Advanced Studies. "It's had a very dramatic impact."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011 | By Jason Kehe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
String Theory, a Los Angeles-based hybrid performance act that combines dance and a kind of sonic sculpture, has little to do with the field of particle physics that gives it its name. However, the two disparate entities do have one striking thing in common ? most people have no idea how to explain either one. There's no "one-liner elevator speech," as one of its dancers put it. "It just is," said another. Even Dale Franzen, artistic director of the Broad Stage in Santa Monica, can't quite categorize the root genre of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | Rick Schultz
A remarkable run of major monuments in the classical-Romantic violin repertoire began in L.A. a few weeks ago when Joshua Bell played Bruch's First Concerto. It signaled the start of what amounts to a crash course in the history of the 19th century violin concerto at the Hollywood Bowl (with a 20th century American classic thrown in). On Thursday, Marin Alsop, music director of the Baltimore Symphony, conducts Gil Shaham in the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
FOOD
March 4, 2009 | Amy Scattergood
You gotta love any kitchen tool that you can get at Home Depot. At the top of my list of must-have hardware-store cooking gear -- along with an inexpensive Microplane and a blowtorch -- is a simple ball of string. Or at least it's my favorite until Thomas Keller figures out how to sous-vide with duct tape. String, specifically cotton butcher's or kitchen twine, is one of the most useful things you can have in your kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
In a move that further widens the geographic reach of their local arts support, philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad have donated $10 million to create an endowment for programming and arts education at the new performing arts center for Santa Monica College. In honor of the gift, to be announced today at the $45-million arts facility, the center's 499-seat performance space will be named the Broad Stage and its 99-seat theater will be dubbed the Edye Second Space, already dubbed "the Edye" by center leadership.
BOOKS
October 8, 2006 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole, who teaches science journalism at USC's Annenberg School, is the author of "The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty."
The Trouble With Physics The Rise of String Theory, the Fall of a Science, and What Comes Next Lee Smolin Houghton Mifflin: 392 pp., $26 IN physics, truth and beauty often walk hand in hand. Physicists describe theories as "ugly" or "beautiful," talk about ideas that "smell" or "feel" right. Often, aesthetic judgments lead to discoveries: as in Einstein's theory of gravity and Paul A.M. Dirac's discovery of antimatter.
BOOKS
January 15, 2006 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer for Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
LEONARD SUSSKIND was a plumber before he reinvented himself as a physicist, a fact that may explain why he is inspired to write about the eye-crossing and mind-boggling complexities of modern science in language that a layperson can understand. In "The Cosmic Landscape," he offers nothing less than an insider's guided tour of theoretical physics over the last century or so, moving from Albert Einstein's theory of relativity to Susskind's own cutting-edge scientific theories.
OPINION
October 17, 2005
Re "Physics strings us along," Opinion, Oct. 11 Margaret Wertheim's characterization that theoretical physics is proceeding without empirical verification is misleading. Scientific inquiry proceeds by proposing hypotheses that are then subject to empirical test through experimentation and observation. String theory is the latest in a series of astoundingly successful "grand hypotheses." Einstein's theory of general relativity was motivated by mathematical insight, not empirical observation, and predicted many unforeseen but surprising and important phenomena.
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