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Stringfellow Acid Disposal Pits

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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In the largest settlement yet in a long-running legal battle over toxic dumping at the Stringfellow Acid Pits, an aluminum manufacturer has agreed to pay $18 million to 3,800 residents of the nearby Riverside County community of Glen Avon. The tentative settlement with Alumax Inc., which is subject to court approval, was reached last week and announced Monday by Melvyn I. Weiss, a New York attorney who represents the residents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
The state won a victory Monday in the struggle with insurance companies to help fund the cleanup of the Stringfellow hazardous waste site in Glen Avon. A Riverside County Superior Court jury found five insurers -- out of 35 that the state purchased policies from -- liable for $16 million to $28 million. The state reached a $93-million settlement with 16 additional insurers in February. After two decades of litigation, the state has so far won $121 million for the cleanup effort.
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NEWS
January 10, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Stringfellow Acid Pits were retired 20 years ago as a state-approved industrial waste dumping ground, they became a monument to Southern California's manufacturing heyday. But their legacy is as California's worst toxic waste site. On Monday, the trial begins here on the largest civil lawsuit in the nation's history to pit neighbors of a toxic site against the companies that dumped there and the government agencies that allowed it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending years of convoluted litigation between the state and federal governments, California has agreed to pay $114.5 million for the cleanup of two infamous toxic dumps, including the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside, once a receptacle for 35 million gallons of industrial chemicals. Gov. Gray Davis announced Monday that the state will reimburse the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $99.
NEWS
October 23, 1988
The Stringfellow acid pits near Glen Avon could be cleaned up in less than half the time suggested by a state-sponsored report, a consultant hired by nearby residents said. Robert Powell, of the Washington-based Environ Corp., suggested a 14-year plan and a 32-year plan for cleaning up the pits. Powell's plans call for excavating and treating about 2.7 million tons of contaminated soil at the Pyrite Canyon dump site in Riverside County.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning an important new phase in the cleanup of California's most notorious toxic waste site, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to extract and treat contaminated ground water migrating from the Stringfellow Acid Pits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1988
A Los Angeles judge Tuesday dismissed a legal action against the federal government by the companies held liable for the cleanup of the Stringfellow hazardous waste dump, saying they had to file a claim first with the government. Retired Superior Court Judge Harry Peetris, sitting as a special master in the federal government's 1983 lawsuit over the cleanup of the Riverside County dump, said Tuesday that if the firms want to argue that the U.S.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nearly two decades after a Riverside County landfill was identified as the worst toxic waste site in California, private companies that dumped most of the hazardous materials have agreed to pay $150 million to help clean it up. The work covered by the settlement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference Thursday, will involve treating contaminated underground water at the Stringfellow Acid Pits and testing cleanup technologies on the soil.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | Associated Press
Spring runoff brewed up another toxic waste leak at the Stringfellow acid pits, prompting officials to close the dump and cancel a Friday tour by jurors hearing a damage suit against its users. Work crews wearing respirators plugged an initial leak Wednesday. It was the third since rainfall saturated the 20-acre dump and surrounding hills two months ago.
NEWS
February 5, 1987
Hazardous waste from the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside are being trucked to Utah because California lacks facilities to handle the material, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency official said. Environmental activists contend that the move is proof that Utah is becoming the dumping ground for hazardous wastes in the West.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending 11 years of litigation, a final $13.5-million settlement will be paid for damages caused by the Stringfellow acid pits, one of the most notorious toxic waste dumps in the nation, both sides said Thursday. The out-of-court settlement will be paid by an insurance company for the state of California, the last remaining defendant in the convoluted civil case that involved about 3,800 plaintiffs.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | Associated Press
Spring runoff brewed up another toxic waste leak at the Stringfellow acid pits, prompting officials to close the dump and cancel a Friday tour by jurors hearing a damage suit against its users. Work crews wearing respirators plugged an initial leak Wednesday. It was the third since rainfall saturated the 20-acre dump and surrounding hills two months ago.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine companies responsible for dumping more than half the industrial chemicals at the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits have agreed, along with Riverside County, to pay $43.6 million in damages, leaving only the state of California as the last major defendant in the case. The settlements bring to more than $96 million the amount of damages that defendants have agreed to pay the 3,800 plaintiffs--all residents of the blue-collar community of Glen Avon, just west of here.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using computer-generated animation to illustrate what he called "real-world" evidence, a state attorney told a Superior Court jury Wednesday that chemicals dumped at the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits did not cause illness among the residents of the adjoining, semirural community of Glen Avon. Because "no harm was caused . . .
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a courtroom like few others--with more than 30 attorneys staged in a gallery terraced like bleachers at a ballgame, and 18 computer video monitors for high-tech display of exhibits--allegations began spewing forth Monday in the landmark Stringfellow Acid Pits civil trial.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Stringfellow Acid Pits were retired 20 years ago as a state-approved industrial waste dumping ground, they became a monument to Southern California's manufacturing heyday. But their legacy is as California's worst toxic waste site. On Monday, the trial begins here on the largest civil lawsuit in the nation's history to pit neighbors of a toxic site against the companies that dumped there and the government agencies that allowed it.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Cleaning up the Stringfellow acid pits could cost $227 million to $812 million and require five decades to centuries to accomplish, according to a report issued by the state Department of Health Services. The 20-acre dump in Pyrite Canyon was shut down after about 34 million gallons of solvents, metals, acids, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides were dumped there from 1956 to 1972.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Nearly two decades after a Riverside County landfill was identified as the worst toxic waste site in California, private companies that dumped most of the hazardous materials have agreed to pay $150 million to help clean it up. The work covered by the settlement, announced at a Los Angeles news conference Thursday, will involve treating contaminated underground water at the Stringfellow Acid Pits and testing cleanup technologies on the soil.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years ago, Penny Newman was a soft-spoken special education teacher, a mother of two whose community activities tended toward PTA and Cub Scout meetings. But that changed in 1979 when a series of rainstorms led the Stringfellow Acid Pits to overflow into the back yards and school playgrounds of the Riverside County community of Glen Avon, Newman's home.
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