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Stringfellow Acid Pits

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NEWS
September 24, 1986 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
A court-appointed official recommended Tuesday that 12 major companies--including General Electric, McDonnell Douglas, Northrop and Rockwell International--be held liable for toxic cleanup costs at the Stringfellow acid pits in Riverside County. The 303-page report of recommendations issued in Los Angeles by former Los Angeles Superior Court Presiding Judge Harry V. Peetris is the first major legal action in the long battle to clean up the dump, located about 10 miles west of Riverside.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The state of California is likely to receive tens of millions of dollars more from insurance companies to clean up the Stringfellow Acid Pits toxic waste dump as a result of a ruling Thursday by the California Supreme Court. In a unanimous decision, the high court said consecutive insurance policies by various companies required each to pay up to their policy limits for damage caused by the Riverside County waste site. The companies wanted to restrict liability to just a share of the damage that occurred during the time each insurer's policy was in effect.
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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In the largest settlement yet in a long-running legal battle over toxic dumping at the Stringfellow Acid Pits, an aluminum manufacturer has agreed to pay $18 million to 3,800 residents of the nearby Riverside County community of Glen Avon. The tentative settlement with Alumax Inc., which is subject to court approval, was reached last week and announced Monday by Melvyn I. Weiss, a New York attorney who represents the residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2005 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Lloyd's of London and 15 other insurers have agreed to pay $93 million to California for cleanup of the Stringfellow acid pits in Riverside County, one of the state's most notorious Superfund sites. State officials and environmentalists who have fought for decades for cleanup of the site, in an impoverished rural pocket of the county where children once played in puddles of industrial waste, said the payments were long overdue. California Atty. Gen.
NEWS
February 6, 1986
Tests have begun on one possible method of purging groundwater of solvents seeping from the Stringfellow Acid Pits in Riverside County. In the tests, water will be pumped through an "air stripping tower," a structure in which air is blown through the water to speed evaporation of some volatile chemicals, said a spokesman for the private contractor studying ways to clean up the closed dump.
NEWS
March 18, 1985 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court issued an order today that apparently allows neighbors of the Stringfellow Acid Pits in Riverside County to sue the state and federal governments over cleanup of the former toxic waste dump. The action by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reverses a ruling by former U.S. District Judge Malcolm Lucas of Los Angeles, who had said the neighbors' interests were adequately represented by the government agencies in the case.
NEWS
March 15, 1985
Despite assurances from water quality experts that treated waste water from the Stringfellow Acid Pits will be safe, the Orange County Sanitation Districts joint board has decided to divert all effluent from the dump cleanup project in Riverside away from local ground water supplies and out to sea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly Ways and Means Committee on Thursday voted to spend $16 million on an emergency effort to slow the underground spread of contamination from the Stringfellow Acid Pits in Riverside County, one of the nation's worst toxic wastes sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly Ways and Means Committee on Thursday voted to spend $16 million on an emergency effort to slow the underground spread of contamination from the Stringfellow Acid Pits in Riverside County, one of the nation's worst toxic wastes sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988
The recent article (Part I, June 19) on the town of Casmalia and its fight with the toxic dump was disturbing. Not just because of the subject but because of the attitudes expressed regarding this serious situation. It is absolutely outrageous in this day and age, with all the documented health problems related to toxic exposure, and with documentation by 72 local physicians, to have someone make the comment that, "I think what's going on . . . is a lot of toxic superstition . . . People have become superstitious about Casmalia Resources and alleging it has caused a lot of problems . . . ."
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding the first civil trial on the largest personal injury lawsuit in the nation over the issue of toxic dumping, jurors Wednesday found the state of California responsible for allowing a witch's brew of chemicals to escape from the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits into the nearby community of Glen Avon. But in a mixed 60-page verdict, the jury concluded that the plaintiffs exaggerated claims of personal injury and property damage caused by the leaking chemical dump. As a result, jurors awarded less than $160,000 of the $3.1 million in damages sought by the plaintiffs.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine companies responsible for dumping more than half the industrial chemicals at the notorious Stringfellow Acid Pits have agreed, along with Riverside County, to pay $43.6 million in damages, leaving only the state of California as the last major defendant in the case. The settlements bring to more than $96 million the amount of damages that defendants have agreed to pay the 3,800 plaintiffs--all residents of the blue-collar community of Glen Avon, just west of here.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In the largest settlement yet in a long-running legal battle over toxic dumping at the Stringfellow Acid Pits, an aluminum manufacturer has agreed to pay $18 million to 3,800 residents of the nearby Riverside County community of Glen Avon. The tentative settlement with Alumax Inc., which is subject to court approval, was reached last week and announced Monday by Melvyn I. Weiss, a New York attorney who represents the residents.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis came to Riverside County on Friday and in the process dramatized both the best and the worst of his presidential campaign. First, he visited the state's most notorious hazardous waste site--the Stringfellow acid pits. But rather than give a speech there--a backdrop that would have dramatized his message that George Bush and the Reagan Administration have failed to clean up toxic waste sites--Dukakis left quickly for a meeting here with about 100 area residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988
The recent article (Part I, June 19) on the town of Casmalia and its fight with the toxic dump was disturbing. Not just because of the subject but because of the attitudes expressed regarding this serious situation. It is absolutely outrageous in this day and age, with all the documented health problems related to toxic exposure, and with documentation by 72 local physicians, to have someone make the comment that, "I think what's going on . . . is a lot of toxic superstition . . . People have become superstitious about Casmalia Resources and alleging it has caused a lot of problems . . . ."
NEWS
February 5, 1987
Hazardous waste from the Stringfellow acid pits near Riverside are being trucked to Utah because California lacks facilities to handle the material, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency official said. Environmental activists contend that the move is proof that Utah is becoming the dumping ground for hazardous wastes in the West.
NEWS
September 29, 1986 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
Within months of taking office, Gov. George Deukmejian declared that he was going to be tough on toxic polluters. In a surprisingly forceful speech to the California Manufacturers Assn.--an audience that might have hoped for relaxation of some regulations--he served notice that the improper disposal of hazardous waste was "the No. 1 environmental problem facing our state" and that environmental laws would be "enforced to the letter."
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
A court-appointed official recommended Tuesday that 12 major companies--including General Electric, McDonnell Douglas, Northrop and Rockwell International--be held liable for toxic cleanup costs at the Stringfellow acid pits in Riverside County. The 303-page report of recommendations issued in Los Angeles by former Los Angeles Superior Court Presiding Judge Harry V. Peetris is the first major legal action in the long battle to clean up the dump, located about 10 miles west of Riverside.
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