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February 15, 1987 | Charles Solomon
"Calvin and Hobbes," Bill Watterson's ultra-popular newspaper comic strip about a difficult little boy and the toy tiger who serves as his imaginary companion, is getting some rare tributes lately--homages from other cartoonists. Teddy Monclava, the problem child in "Mary Worth," has been wearing a T-shirt with a picture of Hobbes, the tiger. And in "Bloom County," cartoonist Berke Breathed pictured character Michael Binkley in a T-shirt that read "Calvin and Hobbes Rule."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2012 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Environmental groups are urging Los Angeles lawmakers to fight the proposed expansion of a strip mine near Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park that for years has helped power Southern California. The City Council is considering a resolution opposing the expansion of the Coal Hollow Mine onto federal lands. The mine produces coal for Utah's Intermountain Power Plant, which in turn provides the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power with more than a quarter of its electricity. The company that owns the 635-acre mine wants to expand its operations more than fivefold to meet ongoing demand.
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NATIONAL
April 20, 2009 | Associated Press
In Maria Gunnoe's 11-year war over the strip mining she says has ruined her homestead, there have been casualties: Family dogs have been poisoned and shot, and her truck's fuel tank has been stuffed with sand. Yet she keeps fighting to stop mountaintop removal mining. And for confronting the coal industry in Appalachia, she is the 2009 North American winner of the Goldman Environmental Prize.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2010 | By Peter Slavin, Los Angeles Times
Those who have sought to keep West Virginia's Blair Mountain open for strip mining despite its storied past did not reckon with Kenny King. It was on Blair Mountain in 1921 that an army of coal miners clashed with an armed force representing the authorities in league with coal companies — the largest battle on American soil since the Civil War and a watershed in labor's struggle for recognition. The state kept the Battle of Blair Mountain out of its history books for half a century and for decades has resisted appeals to commemorate the conflict, presumably because the insurrection was a black eye for the state and the coal industry.
REAL ESTATE
August 25, 1985 | Sam Hall Kaplan
One only has to drive through the north Westwood neighborhood to see why residents there have demanded a building moratorium. The rolling, verdant, square- mile area bounded by Gayley, Veteran and Le Conte avenues is pockmarked by vacant lots recently cleared of buildings, buildings marked for demolition and new, overscaled and ostentatious apartment complexes.
NEWS
March 26, 1985
Former Interior Secretary James G. Watt's controversial 1983 decision to allow strip mining in national parks was improperly adopted and cannot be enforced, a federal judge said in Washington. U.S. District Judge Thomas Flannery said the Interior Department erred in ordering the rule into effect without allowing time for public comment. He sent the matter back to the department, now headed by Secretary Donald P.
NEWS
September 1, 1985 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
It was seven years ago that a self-styled developer named Peyton Smith began blasting away the side of a mountain overlooking the nearby Rockcastle River for what he proudly boasted would be "a fancy condo development for rich New Yorkers." Today, all that remains of that project--which Smith had dubbed "Sportsman's Paradise"--is a violent gash in the earth, scarred with the tracks of strip-miners' bulldozers and spilling piles of ugly rubble down the slope.
NEWS
February 12, 1987
State inspectors charged with enforcing the federal strip-mining law are missing or ignoring many violations of the environmental protection statute, according to a congressional study. The allegation by the General Accounting Office, the investigative wing of Congress, was based on visits last year to strip mines by GAO personnel and inspectors from the federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001
Re "Closing In on Canyons" (Jan. 29): It's nice when a developer takes the time to name his property after whatever he had to bulldoze to make room for it. This evenhanded arrangement has been proposed for the richly ironic "Live Oak Plaza," a strip mall and gas station suggested as improvements to the rural crossroads of El Toro and Live Oak Canyon roads. The developer of a nearby parcel prefers the merely confusing idea of giving horsy names, "Saddle Creek" and "Saddle Crest," to his deforestation and strip-mining projects and has sought the county's permission to chop down over 1,000 mature oaks and to grade the offending slopes.
SPORTS
March 16, 2010 | David Wharton
Reporting from Las Vegas This is not a good season for college basketball in Los Angeles, surely not a good time for fans to get picky about the details. With no Bruins in the NCAA tournament, no Trojans or 49ers in sight, the situation calls for a little geographic flexibility. So if San Diego State and UC Santa Barbara seem too far-fetched, consider cheering for the Runnin' Rebels of Nevada Las Vegas. Their campus lies about four hours to the northeast, not much farther than Chino at rush hour.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2009 | Associated Press
In Maria Gunnoe's 11-year war over the strip mining she says has ruined her homestead, there have been casualties: Family dogs have been poisoned and shot, and her truck's fuel tank has been stuffed with sand. Yet she keeps fighting to stop mountaintop removal mining. And for confronting the coal industry in Appalachia, she is the 2009 North American winner of the Goldman Environmental Prize.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2003 | Ted Botha, Special to The Times
I was sitting at a restaurant when the Canadian woman across the table from me said something that caught me off-guard. "I love this city." At first I thought she was getting carried away by the ambience. We were dining at Sides, a chic establishment whose modern minimalist interior was highlighted with African art, and we had eaten shark carpaccio, hearty bowls of fettuccine with mushrooms and a sinful sticky-toffee pudding with a warm crust.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Early in "Fire on the Mountain," which opened this weekend at the San Diego Repertory Theatre, life as a coal miner -- particularly in the first half of the last century -- is described as an existence where "danger is double and pleasures are few."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001
Re "Closing In on Canyons" (Jan. 29): It's nice when a developer takes the time to name his property after whatever he had to bulldoze to make room for it. This evenhanded arrangement has been proposed for the richly ironic "Live Oak Plaza," a strip mall and gas station suggested as improvements to the rural crossroads of El Toro and Live Oak Canyon roads. The developer of a nearby parcel prefers the merely confusing idea of giving horsy names, "Saddle Creek" and "Saddle Crest," to his deforestation and strip-mining projects and has sought the county's permission to chop down over 1,000 mature oaks and to grade the offending slopes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000
Southern California Edison's explanation that Navajo elders are attempting to use the water issue to gain leverage in a decades-old land dispute with the Hopi (May 2) is pure Hollywood, another way of saying "those pesky savages are on the warpath with each other again and we white folks are innocent bystanders." For decades, Navajo and Hopi lived well enough together on what marginal land was allotted to them. Then Peabody Coal Co. needed legal authorization to mine on the reservation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000
Southern California Edison's explanation that Navajo elders are attempting to use the water issue to gain leverage in a decades-old land dispute with the Hopi (May 2) is pure Hollywood, another way of saying "those pesky savages are on the warpath with each other again and we white folks are innocent bystanders." For decades, Navajo and Hopi lived well enough together on what marginal land was allotted to them. Then Peabody Coal Co. needed legal authorization to mine on the reservation.
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