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Strip Searches

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NATIONAL
April 2, 2012 | By David Savage
The Supreme Court refused Monday to limit strip searches of new jail inmates, even those arrested for minor traffic offenses. Dividing 5-4 along ideological lines, the high court said jail guards needed the full authority to closely search everyone who is entering a jail in order to maintain safety and security. It would be “unworkable,” said Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, to make an exception for persons who are arrested for minor offenses. County jails often must process hundreds of new inmates a day, he said.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Jenn Harris
Burger King's biggest franchise holder, Carrols Restaurant Group,   reportedly has agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle claims of sexual harassment. The settlement, Reuters reported, brings to an end a 14-year lawsuit involving 88 women who formerly worked for Carrols and one current female employee . The company, which owns and operates more than 520 Burger King locations, denies guilt, citing legal costs as the reason for settling.  The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleged that employees harassed women by making obscene comments, exposing their genitalia and subjecting the women to strip searches, unwanted touching and even rape, The Examiner reported.
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court gave a skeptical hearing Tuesday to lawyers for a girl who was strip-searched in school when she was 13 on suspicion that she had extra-strength ibuprofen in her underwear. Instead, most of the justices voiced concern about drugs, such as heroin and crack cocaine, and said they were wary of limiting officials' authority to search students for any drugs. "How is a school administrator supposed to know?" Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. asked.
OPINION
April 4, 2012
By a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that people arrested over traffic and other minor offenses can be strip-searched even if there is no reasonable suspicion that they are concealing weapons or contraband. But the court's decision goes too far. Jailers have a responsibility to make sure that their facilities are secure, but they can do so without the blanket authority the court has given them. The decision was a defeat for Albert Florence, a finance director for a car dealership who was on his way to a family celebration when a New Jersey state trooper stopped his car and, after finding that he had an outstanding warrant, arrested him. The warrant had been issued because of a fine that he actually had paid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1989
A federal appeals court has ruled unconstitutional any strip search by police unless they have reason to suspect that a person in custody is hiding drugs or weapons. In any other circumstance, the court ruled, body-cavity searches are simply "dehumanizing and humiliating," a judgment we applaud. The case involved a woman, Karen Kennedy, who hid as security a television set and two chairs belonging to a roommate who walked out, leaving $694 worth of rent and utility bills in dispute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
Blanket strip searches of incoming jail inmates are constitutional and necessary to prevent the smuggling of contraband into the detention centers, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. The decision by a full 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals replaces a smaller panel's ruling in 2008 that strip searches are so dehumanizing that they violate a person's constitutional rights if conducted without good reason to suspect the individual is carrying drugs or weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three men who say Oakland police conducted strip searches of them in public for no reason have filed a federal class-action lawsuit against the city. Darnell Foster, Rafael Duarte and Yancie Young said officers exposed and inspected their buttocks on busy Oakland streets in separate incidents from 2003 to 2005. The department has since drafted a policy requiring officers to conduct searches away from public view.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Monday ordered the Immigration and Naturalization Service to halt strip searches of juveniles in alien detention centers unless there is reason to believe that they are carrying weapons or contraband. Rejecting the government's arguments that strip searches are necessary to assure security at the INS' three detention centers in California, U.S.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department's policy of subjecting all people arrested for felonies to a visual body-cavity search violates constitutional protections against unreasonable searches, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals could affect police agencies throughout California and eight other Western states that are within the court's jurisdiction. LAPD spokesman Cmdr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge has ruled that the city's former policy allowing new prisoners to be strip-searched, regardless of the charges against them, was unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer ruled last week that the policy, which was changed in January 2004, violated constitutional rules allowing such searches only when inmates are newly arrested on suspicion of crimes involving drugs or violence, or when guards have evidence that an inmate is concealing weapons or contraband.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Former Vice President Dick Cheney was released from the hospital Tuesday, 10 days after receiving a heart transplant, his office announced. The surgery on Cheney, who has had a long history of heart troubles, was performed at Inova Fairfax Hospital Heart and Vascular Institute in Falls Church, Va. In a prepared statement, Cheney thanked his doctors and the unknown donor. "Former Vice President Dick Cheney was released today from Inova Fairfax Hospital Heart and Vascular Institute ten days after heart transplant surgery.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court refused to halt routine strip-searches of new jail inmates, including those arrested for minor offenses, saying the need to screen out weapons and drugs outweighed the right to privacy. The 5-4 majority ruled it would be "unworkable" to require guards - who at large county jails must screen hundreds of new inmates - to spare those who may not appear dangerous. The decision is a defeat for civil liberties groups and a New Jersey man who was strip-searched twice after he was stopped on a highway and taken to jail, where he spent six days, over an unpaid fine that he had already paid.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
After elderly passengers at JFK Airport complained about how they were treated by the Transportation Security Administration , the agency said Sunday it would establish an information line that travelers who are disabled or need assistance can call before flying. The TSA blog post written by blogger Bob Burns said in part: "[W]e're in the process of establishing an 800 number dedicated to travelers with disabilities, medical conditions, or those who may require assistance during screening.
OPINION
October 14, 2011
Should a jailer have a reasonable suspicion that an inmate arrested for a minor offense is carrying contraband before subjecting him to a strip search? The wisdom of such a policy is obvious. But during oral arguments at the Supreme Court this week, the justices engaged in dismissive hairsplitting about when and whether a corrections officer should be able to see a prisoner naked. They shouldn't allow themselves to be distracted from the real issue. Albert Florence was on his way to a family celebration when a New Jersey state trooper stopped his car and, after finding that he had an outstanding warrant, arrested him. The warrant for Florence had been issued because of an unpaid fine that he actually had paid.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Albert Florence, a New Jersey father who was on his way to a family dinner, was stopped by a state trooper, handcuffed, taken to jail and strip-searched, all because of a fine he had already paid. The Supreme Court took up his case Wednesday, not to focus on his mistaken arrest but to decide whether the 14 million Americans who are arrested each year can be strip-searched and closely examined before they enter a jail. The 4th Amendment forbids "unreasonable searches" by the government, and a lawyer for Florence urged the justices to rule that arrestees headed for a cell cannot be closely inspected unless there is a "reasonable suspicion" that they are dangerous.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2010 | By Regina Marler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although American fiction offers few distinctive voices at present, there is no mistaking a Joyce Carol Oates story for anyone else's. You could tear off the cover of her latest collection, "Sourland," and identify these stories from their opening lines alone. "Four years old she'd begun to hear in fragments and patches like handfuls of torn clouds the story of the stabbing in Manhattan that was initially her mother's story. " ("The Story of the Stabbing") "Is there a soul I have to wonder.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | Associated Press
An entire high school Spanish class was strip-searched after one girl complained that her money was missing, school authorities, pupils and parents said. Royal High School students and teachers told the Houston Chronicle that the search was ordered by an assistant principal while top administrators were in a meeting. They said students were told their parents had consented to the search, but parents later denied it, or denied they were told it would be a strip search. The money was not found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
Blanket strip searches of incoming jail inmates are constitutional and necessary to prevent the smuggling of contraband into the detention centers, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. The decision by a full 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals replaces a smaller panel's ruling in 2008 that strip searches are so dehumanizing that they violate a person's constitutional rights if conducted without good reason to suspect the individual is carrying drugs or weapons.
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