Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStrip Searches
IN THE NEWS

Strip Searches

NATIONAL
August 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A southeast Missouri school district has agreed to pay $7,500 each to the families of eight junior high girls who were strip-searched over missing money, the district superintendent said. The seventh- and eighth-graders, ages 12 to 15, were searched Jan. 6 after $55 disappeared from a teacher's desk. Attorneys said Poplar Bluff Junior High Assistant Principal Mike Ivie and security officer Johnny Williams conducted searches of gym clothing, purses, coats, shoes and pockets.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
About 60 inmates who refused to be strip-searched at High Desert State Prison in Susanville launched an attack on prison workers Monday, sending 11 to the hospital, officials said. "They were trying to get as much blood as they could," said Mark Viale, chapter head of the prison officers union. "They were trying to kill people. It was a full-blown riot." Prisoners attacked after officers put down a fistfight between two white inmates in a prison yard, said Lt. Chuck Spirk, the prison spokesman.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
Across the country, hundreds of lawsuits are being pursued by people who claim they were subjected to degrading and improper strip searches. "The strip search was the worst thing that I've ever encountered," said Danni Tyson, a 49-year-old woman who was forced to disrobe by female New York City jail guards after being arrested on a disorderly conduct charge four years ago. "I just couldn't stop crying. I felt stupid. I felt very, very angry. I just felt so helpless."
OPINION
June 27, 2009
Common sense and constitutional law don't always come to the same conclusion, but the U.S. Supreme Court has done justice to both in ruling that an Arizona middle school violated the 4th Amendment by subjecting a 13-year-old girl to a strip search. With only Justice Clarence Thomas dissenting, the court has drawn a bright line that school officials will transgress at their legal peril.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lawndale School District superintendent, in his most explicit remarks about the strip search of several students by two aides, has called the incident improper and has vowed a review of hiring procedures. Meanwhile, the parents of two of the students have hired a lawyer, who termed the searches inappropriate but stopped short of saying a lawsuit was forthcoming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1990 | ADRIANNE GOODMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard high school board members Wednesday tabled a proposal to allow school officials to conduct body searches--even modified strip searches--of students if they have reasonable suspicion that the student is harboring contraband. The policy would affect students at six schools in the Oxnard Union High School District.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of people who claimed they were illegally strip-searched after being arrested for minor offenses could get up to $22,500 each under a $50-million settlement from the city. The searches were conducted by jail guards over 10 months in 1996 and 1997. They were often performed on first-time offenders arrested for minor infractions such as loitering and disorderly conduct as part of Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's crackdown on "quality of life" violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pomona Police Department policy mandating strip-searches of all felony suspects is unconstitutional, a federal judge declared in a tentative ruling Monday. U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson made his remarks in connection with a lawsuit by a 48-year-old woman who was strip-searched after being arrested on suspicion of passing a counterfeit $20 bill.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2008 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
Schools may not strip-search students for drugs based on an unverified tip, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. Overturning two other rulings, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said an assistant principal at an Arizona middle school violated the constitutional rights of a 13-year-old by ordering her to be strip-searched. He thought the honor student had prescription-strength ibuprofen; she did not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2007 | Joe Mozingo and Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writers
San Bernardino County officials have agreed to pay $25.5 million to settle a class-action lawsuit that said jailers conducted illegal strip searches, sometimes in front of inmates and deputies of the opposite sex. As many as 160,000 inmates may have been subjected to the searches over three years, attorneys for the plaintiffs said, and each could get several hundred dollars, depending on how many apply for the award.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|