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Strobe Talbott

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NEWS
December 28, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Strobe Talbott, President Clinton's top expert on Russia and other former Soviet republics, will be appointed deputy secretary of state today in a move calculated to give the Administration a new and articulate spokesman for its troubled foreign policy, Administration officials said Monday.
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BOOKS
June 9, 2002 | ANDERS STEPHANSON, Anders Stephanson is the author of "Kennan and the Art of Foreign Policy" and a historian of foreign relations at Columbia University.
If you think Strobe Talbott's title smacks of John le Carre, you are absolutely right: Russians and Americans in his book seem fascinated by the tales of the English master of spy fiction, and "The Russia Hand" suggests one of his twilight experts, put out to pasture at the academic filiation of the Secret Service in the red-brick expanse of North Oxford. That red-brick expanse, however, is the only real link with le Carre's world.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | JAMES P> PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton is a lecturer at the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Quick quiz: Who once sang, "Imagine there's no countries"? You're right if you answered John Lennon. Now how about this: "Nationhood as we know it will be obsolete." Was that the next line of "Imagine," the late Beatle's 1971 utopian anthem? No, those words were written by Strobe Talbott, deputy secretary of State for this particular nation, when he was still a columnist for Time magazine, on July 20, 1992. Yet, even if he can't carry a tune, attention should be paid to Talbott.
NEWS
January 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Former diplomat and journalist Strobe Talbott has been named president of the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, one of the nation's oldest political think tanks. Talbott, 55, is in charge of Yale University's center on globalization studies. He served as deputy secretary of State during both terms of the Clinton administration. Before his stint with the State Department, he spent more than two decades as a reporter, editor and foreign policy columnist for Time magazine.
OPINION
January 23, 1994 | GEORGE WEIGEL, George Weigel is president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington. and
Strobe Talbott, the deputy secretary of state-designate, was more than a mere reporter during his days as chief diplomatic correspondent and editor-at-large of Time magazine. He was, rather, an advocate for a distinctive interpretation of the Cold War, and particularly of its endgame. Now that he is playing a large, even dominant, role in formulating U.S. foreign policy, Talbott's understanding of the recent past is of more than antiquarian interest.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historians record that one Pakistani prime minister visited New York just as the National League pennant-winning Giants, with Willie Mays in center field, blanked Cleveland in the 1954 World Series. "This proves that the Indians are overrated," Mohammed Ali quipped to his hosts in Manhattan. Like baseball, the neighboring nations of India and Pakistan have traditionally seen their troubled relations, which have led to three wars, as having one winner and one loser.
BOOKS
March 21, 1993 | The Editors
In early 1989, historian Michael Beschloss and Time magazine editor (and now President Clinton's designated ambassador-at-large) Strobe Talbott teamed up to write an account of diplomacy "at the highest levels" of post- glasnost U.S.-Soviet relations. The authors' access to anonymous sources in both governments enabled them to weave a fly-on-the-wall narrative so vivid (and so unencumbered with documentation) that we thought the flavor of the story could best be captured through a few vignettes.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His clothes usually display a professorial rumple and he has been known to turn up at dinner parties in shorts and a turtleneck. But former journalist Strobe Talbott is about to parachute into the top level of the pin-striped world of diplomacy as the Clinton Administration's top strategist on Russia and the rest of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Former diplomat and journalist Strobe Talbott has been named president of the nonpartisan Brookings Institution, one of the nation's oldest political think tanks. Talbott, 55, is in charge of Yale University's center on globalization studies. He served as deputy secretary of State during both terms of the Clinton administration. Before his stint with the State Department, he spent more than two decades as a reporter, editor and foreign policy columnist for Time magazine.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Some Jewish groups are urging President Clinton to withdraw Strobe Talbott as his nominee for the No. 2 spot at the State Department, citing what they say are his anti-Israel writings when he was a Time magazine reporter. Talbott will face tough questions on his Mideast views at confirmation hearings beginning Tuesday, sources on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1999 | JAMES P> PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton is a lecturer at the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Quick quiz: Who once sang, "Imagine there's no countries"? You're right if you answered John Lennon. Now how about this: "Nationhood as we know it will be obsolete." Was that the next line of "Imagine," the late Beatle's 1971 utopian anthem? No, those words were written by Strobe Talbott, deputy secretary of State for this particular nation, when he was still a columnist for Time magazine, on July 20, 1992. Yet, even if he can't carry a tune, attention should be paid to Talbott.
OPINION
February 26, 1995 | Doyle McManus, Doyle McManus covers the White House for The Times. He reported on the State Department for the last 12 years. He is the co-author of "Flashpoints: Promise and Peril in a New World" (Knopf)
Deputy secretary of state, the No. 2 spot in the State Department, was long one of the more obscure positions in Washington--until Nelson Strobridge Talbott III took the job. Talbott, a former Time magazine correspondent, was one of Bill Clinton's closest confidants: the capital's original, and most authentic, Friend of Bill.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historians record that one Pakistani prime minister visited New York just as the National League pennant-winning Giants, with Willie Mays in center field, blanked Cleveland in the 1954 World Series. "This proves that the Indians are overrated," Mohammed Ali quipped to his hosts in Manhattan. Like baseball, the neighboring nations of India and Pakistan have traditionally seen their troubled relations, which have led to three wars, as having one winner and one loser.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite some blunt public statements by Pakistan, Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott voiced "high optimism" Saturday as he ended discussions there on regional nuclear arms control. "I have just completed a very good day of talks in Islamabad," Talbott said after lunching with Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and meeting other Pakistani officials. "Much was accomplished today."
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott opened talks Thursday on his first overseas trip as America's No. 2 diplomat, but India and Pakistan gave a frigid welcome to proposals he carried for reducing the danger of nuclear war between them. Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, citing national honor, said she could never agree to constrain her country's "peaceful nuclear program" if India were not made to do the same.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing away from some of the provocative assertions he made during his career as a journalist, Strobe Talbott expressed unreserved support for Israel on Tuesday and said that the United States should never use foreign aid to pressure friendly democracies into changing course.
NEWS
December 29, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher officially named Strobe Talbott, a former journalist and old friend of President Clinton, as deputy secretary of state on Tuesday, saying it was a combination of Talbott's foreign policy expertise, youth and experience outside of government that prompted his selection.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton chose his old Oxford roommate, former Time magazine correspondent Strobe Talbott, to be the State Department's No. 2 official, it was not supposed to be a controversial appointment. "An inspired choice," glowed House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.). "A gifted strategic thinker," said Secretary of State Warren Christopher, who saw Talbott as a secret weapon to turn Clinton's attention to foreign policy.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
Some Jewish groups are urging President Clinton to withdraw Strobe Talbott as his nominee for the No. 2 spot at the State Department, citing what they say are his anti-Israel writings when he was a Time magazine reporter. Talbott will face tough questions on his Mideast views at confirmation hearings beginning Tuesday, sources on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee said.
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