Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStroheim
IN THE NEWS

Stroheim

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A revealing pairing of experimental works by structuralist filmmaker James Benning launches the spring Film and Video Series at Disney Hall's REDCAT. In 1977 Benning shot "One Way Boogie Woogie," a one-hour film composed of 60 minute-long shots of industrial urban landscapes in his native Milwaukee. For "27 Years Later," he returned to the same locales with the same people in them to record the changes. They'll be shown Monday, with Benning in attendance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Susan King
Italian classic films directed by masters of cinema Federico Fellini, Vittorio de Sica and Michelangelo Antonioni will be vying for viewers' attention Thursday evening. The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood presents Fellini's haunting 1954 drama "La Strada," starring his wife, Giulietta Masina, and Anthony Quinn. Released in the U.S. in 1956, "La Strada" won the very first foreign language film Academy Award. The Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica will be celebrating the 65th anniversary of De Sica's neorealism masterpiece, "Bicycle Thieves.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Nancy Olson Livingston was all of 20, a theater arts major at UCLA and a newly signed ingénue at Paramount when she was cast as Betty Schaefer in "Sunset Blvd.," Billy Wilder's 1950 masterpiece about Hollywood. The film starred Gloria Swanson as the former silent movie star Norma Desmond; William Holden as Joe Gillis, a struggling screenwriter who agrees to write her comeback vehicle; Erich von Stroheim as Max, Desmond's former husband and director now working as her butler and chauffeur; and Livingston as the young reader at Paramount, who falls for Joe. "Billy Wilder did something unusual before I was cast," Livingston recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Nancy Olson Livingston was all of 20, a theater arts major at UCLA and a newly signed ingénue at Paramount when she was cast as Betty Schaefer in "Sunset Blvd.," Billy Wilder's 1950 masterpiece about Hollywood. The film starred Gloria Swanson as the former silent movie star Norma Desmond; William Holden as Joe Gillis, a struggling screenwriter who agrees to write her comeback vehicle; Erich von Stroheim as Max, Desmond's former husband and director now working as her butler and chauffeur; and Livingston as the young reader at Paramount, who falls for Joe. "Billy Wilder did something unusual before I was cast," Livingston recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trivia question: Who made the most number of appearances in the movies of Alfred Hitchcock? The answer, of course, is Hitchcock himself. The director, who had a way of popping up in newspaper ads, neon signs and other unlikely places, is the most famous example of a filmmaker who didn't always stay behind the scenes. While Hitchcock's cameos were derided by some as self-promotion, other directors haven't hesitated to do the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1985 | STEVEN SMITH, Smith, a USC senior majoring in broadcast journalism, is a Calendar intern
"I don't really like the term film preservation. It's a misnomer," Ron Haver said from his County Museum of Art office. " Moving picture preservation is much better, because you can't preserve film; it's too unstable. "It'll last 50, maybe 100 years if you don't touch it, but what's the point? If you're preserving it you want to show it, but if you show it you're in danger of ruining it."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Susan King
Italian classic films directed by masters of cinema Federico Fellini, Vittorio de Sica and Michelangelo Antonioni will be vying for viewers' attention Thursday evening. The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood presents Fellini's haunting 1954 drama "La Strada," starring his wife, Giulietta Masina, and Anthony Quinn. Released in the U.S. in 1956, "La Strada" won the very first foreign language film Academy Award. The Cinematheque's Aero Theatre in Santa Monica will be celebrating the 65th anniversary of De Sica's neorealism masterpiece, "Bicycle Thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1986 | RICHARD SOGLIUZZO
On Monday, Hollywood commemorates the 50th anniversary of the death of Luigi Pirandello with a performance of selections from his plays and tales at the James A. Doolittle Theatre. The cast will include Julie Harris , Michael York, John Houseman, Nina Foch and Mariangela Melato; the director is Maurizio Scaparro, director of the Teatro di Roma.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since it's often claimed that the greatest loss in the history of the cinema is the 32 reels that Metro cut from Erich Von Stroheim's "Greed" (1923), it is important to remember that the 10 that remain were enough to get it voted as one of the 12 best films of all time by an international jury at the Brussels Exposition of 1958. As tragic as the fate of "Greed" was, it remains, even in truncated form, timelessly dazzling.
NEWS
October 27, 1988
Valerie M. von Stroheim, 91, widow of legendary director and actor Erich von Stroheim, who died in France in 1957 at the age of 71. She had a brief career as a silent screen actress before marrying the director of "Greed" and featured player in "Sunset Boulevard." In Sherman Oaks on Saturday.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
A revealing pairing of experimental works by structuralist filmmaker James Benning launches the spring Film and Video Series at Disney Hall's REDCAT. In 1977 Benning shot "One Way Boogie Woogie," a one-hour film composed of 60 minute-long shots of industrial urban landscapes in his native Milwaukee. For "27 Years Later," he returned to the same locales with the same people in them to record the changes. They'll be shown Monday, with Benning in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
He was the "Man You Love to Hate." Considered by some to be the director who most influenced European filmmakers, he was admired by the likes of France's Jean Renoir and the Soviet Union's Sergei Eisenstein. During the silent era, he was a contemporary of such directors as Cecil B. DeMille and D.W. Griffith.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Four films directed by "the man you love to hate," two very, very long epics, Bogey's last bad-guy movie and a ghostly screwball comedy head the pack of oldies recently making their DVD bows. They make up a diverse group that nonetheless together offers an antidote to the patriotic fare filling TV screens at the moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | DENNIS MCLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Josef Erich von Stroheim, an award-winning motion picture and television sound editor who was also the son of the legendary silent film director Erich von Stroheim, has died. He was 79. Von Stroheim died March 22 at Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys of complications from lung cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Greed," Erich von Stroheim's 1924 mutilated masterpiece, stands as Hollywood's archetypal example of art destroyed by commerce. Stroheim had the audacity to bring Frank Norris' Zolaesque 1899 novel "McTeague" to the screen for the Goldwyn Co. as a 9 1/2-hour epic. In a singular stroke of bad luck for Stroheim, during the film's production Goldwyn merged with Metro to become Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was to bring the director into a confrontation with the new studio's chief, Louis B.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999 | BILL DESOWITZ, Bill Desowitz is a frequent contributor to Calendar
How do you reconstruct "Greed," the most notoriously mutilated masterpiece in film history, without the rest of Erich von Stroheim's grim tapestry of love, fate, heredity and lust for gold in San Francisco of the 1920s? Simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Greed," Erich von Stroheim's 1924 mutilated masterpiece, stands as Hollywood's archetypal example of art destroyed by commerce. Stroheim had the audacity to bring Frank Norris' Zolaesque 1899 novel "McTeague" to the screen for the Goldwyn Co. as a 9 1/2-hour epic. In a singular stroke of bad luck for Stroheim, during the film's production Goldwyn merged with Metro to become Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was to bring the director into a confrontation with the new studio's chief, Louis B.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers film for the Times Orange County Edition.
"Greed" was probably Erich von Stroheim's greatest achievement. It was also his greatest disappointment. This seminal example of silent filmmaking, one of a short list of movies that defined the medium during the '20s, was a trial for Von Stroheim from the start. In adapting Frank Norris' popular novel, "McTeague," Von Stroheim spent hard months shooting in San Francisco, the desert and mountain locales.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trivia question: Who made the most number of appearances in the movies of Alfred Hitchcock? The answer, of course, is Hitchcock himself. The director, who had a way of popping up in newspaper ads, neon signs and other unlikely places, is the most famous example of a filmmaker who didn't always stay behind the scenes. While Hitchcock's cameos were derided by some as self-promotion, other directors haven't hesitated to do the same.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|