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SCIENCE
October 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Having a stroke, or even a transient ischemic attack (a TIA, often called a "mini-stroke") can be a costly watershed in a person's life. Statistically, it deducts years from patients' lives. But it claims another toll too: in quality of life after the stroke has happened. New research tallies the combined cost of those two very different measures, and suggests that current treatments for stroke aren't doing nearly enough to minimize strokes' true cost. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, is an exercise in health economics that seeks to generate a fuller picture of a disease's cost.
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SPORTS
April 6, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
The gallery surrounded co-leaders Lexi Thompson and Michelle Wie on the first tee anticipating an 18-hole duel to win the Kraft Nabisco Championship. But the battle effectively was over after only nine holes. The 19-year-old Thompson stormed to a five-shot lead over Wie by the turn and finished three shots ahead Sunday to win her first LPGA major tournament and fourth LPGA Tour event. Thompson made a 10-foot birdie putt on the first hole at Mission Hills Country Club in Rancho Mirage and never let up until she took the winner's traditional jump into Poppie's Pond next to the 18th green.
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NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
When it comes to stroke, neurologists are fond of reminding us that "time equals brain. " What they mean is that, if you are experiencing any of the warning signs of stroke, the faster you get to the hospital, the more often physicians can take measures that limit the brain damage and  long-term disability that stroke can cause. But apparently, Americans are not getting that message -- and it may be costing us brain cells we can ill afford to lose. A " Research Letter " reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Steve Virgen
Going into the final round of the 20th Toshiba Classic, Fred Couples didn't think he could win the tournament because Bernhard Langer had been so hot. But on Sunday at Newport Beach Country Club, Couples grabbed momentum on his back nine to give himself an opportunity. Still a victory wasn't close to being secured because at one point nine golfers had held or shared the lead. Six were tied for the lead with three holes remaining. But Couples shot a five-under-par 66 in his final round and finished at 15-under 198 to become the second player in Toshiba Classic history to win the event twice, as he won it in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
L.A.'s smog problem might not be as visible as it was in the bad old days of the 1970s and '80s, but city residents might be at an increased risk of stroke even at levels of pollution that meet EPA standards. Oh yeah, and memory loss. A new study published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that Boston residents experienced more strokes when exposed to “moderate” amounts of particulate air pollution, as opposed to “good” amounts of pollution, according to EPA standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Joe Jackson, father of Michael Jackson, suffered a minor stroke and was hospitalized late Wednesday, a family rep said, but by Friday was back to normal and cracking jokes, according to a family friend. Jackson, 83, went to a hospital in Las Vegas, his current hometown, after he had trouble standing up and walking and had pain in his head, spokeswoman Angel Howansky told the Associated Press. She said he called a friend for a ride to the hospital and was expected to be released Friday.  "He's back to the regular Joe Jackson, cracking jokes and talking," family friend Rutt Premsrirut told the Las Vegas Review-Journal , which also said wife Katherine Jackson was en route to Vegas from her L.A. home.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Women whose mothers had a stroke have a higher risk of both stroke and heart attack, researchers reported Tuesday. It's well-known that heart disease in one's parents increases the risk in their offspring. However, there appear to be sex-specific tendencies in how cardiovascular disease is inherited. In the study, researchers from the University of Oxford examined data from more than 2,200 women. Women with heart disease were more likely to have mothers who had a stroke than fathers who had a stroke.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, For the Booster Shots blog
A childhood marked by abuse or physical deprivation can leave lifelong marks on a person's health, raising the risk of heart disease, psychiatric disorders and chronic poverty. But a new study finds that the far more common and subtle experience of emotional neglect in childhood seems to confer another health risk at the other end of life: a higher likelihood of stroke. Compared with adults who believed themselves loved and emotionally nurtured as children, those who reported a "moderate" absence of parental warmth and care were almost three times more likely to have suffered strokes that left indelible imprints on their brains, says the study.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Heavy drinkers who consume three or more servings of alcohol per day are at increased risk of a type of stroke called an intracerebral hemorrhage - and they're more likely to have that stroke at an earlier age than patients who don't drink, scientists reported Monday. Writing in the journal Neurology , researchers from the University of Lille Nord de France reported that on average, heavy drinkers were afflicted with intracerebral hemorrhage - which is caused by bleeding in the brain and has a more dire prognosis than more-common ischemic strokes, which are caused by clots in blood vessels - 14 years earlier than people who were not heavy drinkers.  People who drank a lot also were more likely to have a stroke deep in the brain, wrote neurologist Dr. Charlotte Cordonnier and colleagues.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Apparently, not all pills got the memo about, first, doing no harm. Many formulations of common medications contain high levels of sodium, and a new study finds that people who take those medications are 22% more likely to suffer a non-fatal stroke and 28% more likely to die of any cause than people who take the same medications in formulations that do not contain sodium. Among the patients in the study who took medications containing sodium, the median daily sodium dose from those medicines  alone was 106.8 millimoles a day -- higher than recommended daily maximum dietary intake of 104 millimoles a day. The newest study on sodium in medicines was published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal (BMJ)
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | Kevin Baxter
One of the most difficult things to do in professional sports is to take a round bat, swing at a round ball and hit it square. Now imagine trying to do that after sitting out a full season at an age when most players are considering retirement. That's the challenge Chone Figgins is facing this spring in his longshot bid to make the Dodgers. Figgins is batting only .154 in 13 spring-training at-bats, but he says he's making progress. "The more and more you see pitching, the more comfortable you get," the former American League All-Star said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Josh Hamilton arrived at Angels camp Sunday, hoping to play the heavy. The 6-foot-4 left fielder checked in at 240 pounds, a solid 28 pounds heavier than he was at the end of 2013, believing it would help his production. "I feel a lot stronger," said Hamilton, who reported at 227 pounds last spring and finished the season at 212. "I had never really lifted heavy weights to gain muscle like this. . . . "It will help. My joints won't feel as good. I'll probably hurt a little bit more.
SPORTS
February 15, 2014
We are going to tuck away the stern, objective journalistic approach for a day and suggest you root. That means you, golf fans. Or you, general sports fans - anybody with a TV that gets the Golf Channel and CBS. Click it on Sunday and root. Better yet, come on out to Riviera Country Club and walk alongside one stumpy little guy, whose curly hair flows out from under his cap like he's a Rory McIlroy impersonator and whose putter, at the moment, is also impersonating McIlroy in his good days.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Get moving is the message for yet more evidence of health benefits. This time researchers found that women who took part in moderate exercise, such as walking briskly or playing tennis, resulted in a significant reduction in risk of having a stroke. And the best bet is to get moving now. “The benefits of reducing risk of stroke were further observed among the group of women who had a sustained moderate level of physical activity over time,” said Sophia Wang, the study's lead author and a professor at the Beckman Research Institute at the City of Hope.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
A groundbreaking Los Angeles clinical trial has proven a disappointment in demonstrating that a safe and inexpensive mineral infusion could reduce disability in stroke patients. But the researchers behind a UCLA trial called "Fast-Mag" said the eight-year effort drove dramatic improvements in the care of stroke victims across the Southland, rallying hospitals, emergency medical teams and physicians to deliver faster and more targeted care. Among 1,700 Los Angeles-area subjects who suffered a stroke between 2005 and 2012, UCLA neurologist Dr. Jeffrey Saver reported Thursday, those who got magnesium sulfate infusions for two days fared no better three months later than those who got a placebo infusion.
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
One more reason to keep your glass half full: Optimists might be less likely to have a stroke. In new research, the more people believe good things will happen, the less likely they were to suffer a stroke within two years. Psychology researchers from the University of Michigan examined data from 6,044 stroke-free adults from the Health and Retirement Study. The adults answered how much they agreed with statements like “In uncertain times, I usually expect the best,” and two years later the researchers tracked which participants had suffered a stroke.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
Randy Travis has had a stroke and was undergoing surgery at a Plano, Texas, hospital to relieve pressure on his brain, his representative said Wednesday evening. The singer remains in critical condition. The stroke came as a result of Travis' congestive heart failure, a condition that had landed him in the hospital Sunday. "His family and friends here with him at the hospital request your prayers and support," said rep Kirt Webster, who promised updates as they became available.  RELATED: Randy Travis' career in pictures The Grammy winner had undergone a procedure to implant a tiny pump in his heart to stabilize him to be moved from a Baylor hospital in McKinney, Texas, to the Heart Hospital Baylor Plano.  Earlier Wednesday, before Travis suffered the stroke, Dr. Michael Mack, director of cardiovascular disease at the Baylor Health Care System in Dallas, said that the singer's "condition has stabilized and he has shown signs of improvement" since the transfer.
SCIENCE
February 6, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Long before a woman hits middle age, she and her doctor should be thinking about her risk of stroke and taking steps to reduce it, according to the first set of stroke guidelines aimed at women. The overall stroke risk for women is higher than it is for men, in part because women live longer. But the new guidelines from the American Heart Assn. underscore that many other factors may increase their risk as well, and many of them are evident when a woman is in her 20s and 30s. Some, like complications of pregnancy and menopause, are unique to women.
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