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Strom Thurmond

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OPINION
March 1, 2007 | By Al Sharpton Jr, The Rev. AL SHARPTON JR. is a civil rights activist and founder of the National Action Network
LAST WEEK, I received the shock of my life. I found out that my family was enslaved by the family of the leading segregationist of our time, the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. I don't know whether Thurmond himself was my blood relative; there has been no DNA testing yet. What I do know now is the horrific details of how my great-grandfather and family were slaves, directly owned and leased out like chattel animals. This revelation about my ancestors has made slavery real to me. It is no longer an abstract horror.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | Elaine Woo
A week before Christmas in 2003, a retired Los Angeles schoolteacher stood before a phalanx of news cameras and 250 reporters in a South Carolina ballroom and declared, "I am Essie Mae Washington-Williams, and at last I am completely free. " After more than 60 years, Washington-Williams had chosen to unburden herself of a secret: that she, a black woman, had been fathered by a white man - Sen. Strom Thurmond, the legendary South Carolina politician who had built a long Washington career as a champion of segregation.
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NEWS
December 17, 2003 | By Essie Mae Washington Williams
Strom Thurmond was my father. I have known this since 1941, when I was 16 years old. My mother took me to his law office and introduced me to him as his daughter and him to me as my father. It was a very cordial meeting and was the beginning of a lifetime of warm and friendly encounters. In fact, the impetus for a closer relationship often came from him, such as when he suggested I attend South Carolina State College. Even though the circumstances of my birth were not traditional, I appreciated the relationship that evolved across the years between my father and me. Many have asked why I have never said anything before about Strom Thurmond being my father.
OPINION
July 12, 2012
The late Strom Thurmond is best known for his 48 years in the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina, his segregationist candidacy for the presidency in 1948 and the fact that even though he was a longtime opponent of racial equality, he fathered a child with a black teenage housekeeper. But Thurmond also lent his name to the so-called Thurmond Rule, according to which Senate action on judicial confirmations is supposed to stop several months before a presidential election. The rule - actually a custom that sometimes has been honored in the breach - goes back to 1968, when Thurmond and other Republicans held up action on President Johnson's nomination of Abe Fortas to be chief justice of the United States.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | HEATHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he answered questions Thursday about the record he is about to set as the longest-serving member of the U.S. Senate, it was not surprising that 94-year-old Strom Thurmond had difficulty making out one word: retirement. Asked at a Capitol Hill news conference what he planned to do after retirement, the South Carolina Republican said he couldn't hear part of the question. That prompted an onlooker to interject: "He doesn't understand the word!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2013 | Elaine Woo
A week before Christmas in 2003, a retired Los Angeles schoolteacher stood before a phalanx of news cameras and 250 reporters in a South Carolina ballroom and declared, "I am Essie Mae Washington-Williams, and at last I am completely free. " After more than 60 years, Washington-Williams had chosen to unburden herself of a secret: that she, a black woman, had been fathered by a white man - Sen. Strom Thurmond, the legendary South Carolina politician who had built a long Washington career as a champion of segregation.
OPINION
July 1, 2003
The death of former Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) reminds us that racists have been extraordinarily powerful in our government (obituary, June 27). He fought against civil rights legislation and became the longest-serving senator in our history. As the senior Republican he was at times in the line of succession to become president. Thank you for quoting this disgusting man's remarks on the "Negro." The current Senate majority leader described him as a "close friend, confidant and colleague of most of us in this body," which says a great deal about him and the Senate today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lois Crouch Matheny Addy, 109, a retired schoolteacher and principal who baby-sat for U.S. Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) when he was a boy and always voted for him, died Monday in a nursing home in Saluda, S.C., the town where she spent her whole life. In a 1995 interview, Addy recalled taking care of a young Thurmond, whose father was a law partner with Addy's brother-in-law. "The easiest way to entertain him was riding horseback," she said. "We felt like he was our little brother."
NATIONAL
December 14, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
An attorney representing a Los Angeles woman said Saturday that she would "bring some closure to her life story" and announce Wednesday that she is the daughter of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond and a black teenager who worked in his family's South Carolina home. The attorney, Frank K. Wheaton, said that 78-year-old Essie Mae Washington Williams, a retired teacher who has lived in Los Angeles since 1964, had "irrefutable" evidence of Thurmond's paternity.
OPINION
March 1, 2007 | Al Sharpton Jr., The Rev. AL SHARPTON JR. is a civil rights activist and founder of the National Action Network.
LAST WEEK, I received the shock of my life. I found out that my family was enslaved by the family of the leading segregationist of our time, the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. I don't know whether Thurmond himself was my blood relative; there has been no DNA testing yet. What I do know now is the horrific details of how my great-grandfather and family were slaves, directly owned and leased out like chattel animals. This revelation about my ancestors has made slavery real to me.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Lisa Murkowski has been certified as the winner of the Senate race in Alaska, ending two months of legal wrangling over the seat she has held since 2002. Gov. Sean Parnell and Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell, who oversees elections, signed the paperwork Thursday morning, according to the governor's office. The paperwork will be delivered to Washington in time for Murkowski to be sworn in next week. That will ensure that there is no interruption in Murkowski's service and seniority. Murkowski, who is on vacation, has scheduled a swearing-in reception for Wednesday in Washington, according to her website.
OPINION
March 1, 2007 | Al Sharpton Jr., The Rev. AL SHARPTON JR. is a civil rights activist and founder of the National Action Network.
LAST WEEK, I received the shock of my life. I found out that my family was enslaved by the family of the leading segregationist of our time, the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. I don't know whether Thurmond himself was my blood relative; there has been no DNA testing yet. What I do know now is the horrific details of how my great-grandfather and family were slaves, directly owned and leased out like chattel animals. This revelation about my ancestors has made slavery real to me.
OPINION
March 1, 2007 | By Al Sharpton Jr, The Rev. AL SHARPTON JR. is a civil rights activist and founder of the National Action Network
LAST WEEK, I received the shock of my life. I found out that my family was enslaved by the family of the leading segregationist of our time, the late Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. I don't know whether Thurmond himself was my blood relative; there has been no DNA testing yet. What I do know now is the horrific details of how my great-grandfather and family were slaves, directly owned and leased out like chattel animals. This revelation about my ancestors has made slavery real to me. It is no longer an abstract horror.
OPINION
February 28, 2007
Re "Sharpton's ancestor was owned by Thurmond kin," Feb. 26 Modern technology enables us to confirm specific instances of what was previously understood only in generalities. The sweat of the brows of the Rev. Al Sharpton's ancestors created huge wealth for the Thurmond family, which was expropriated forcibly and without consent from the Sharptons. That wealth has been handed down as a free and unearned inheritance to the Thurmond family, while Sharpton's legacy was that his family had to flee the South and claw its way up through squalid conditions of Northern urban poverty, such that everything Sharpton has achieved today is truly self-made -- and the wealth of the Thurmonds is also Sharpton-made.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Rev. Al Sharpton said he wants a DNA test to determine whether he is related to former segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond through his great-grandfather, a slave owned by an ancestor of the late senator. "I can't find out anything more shocking than I've already learned," Sharpton told the Daily News. Professional genealogists found that Sharpton's great-grandfather, Coleman Sharpton, was a slave owned by Julia Thurmond, whose grandfather was Strom Thurmond's great-great-grandfather.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2007 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Al Sharpton said Sunday it was the "most shocking" news of his life when the civil rights leader learned he was a descendant of a slave owned by relatives of Strom Thurmond, the late senator who once led the segregationist South. "I couldn't describe the emotions that I've had over the last two or three days thinking about this," he said at a news conference. "Everything from anger and outrage to reflection, and to some pride and glory."
OPINION
July 12, 2012
The late Strom Thurmond is best known for his 48 years in the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina, his segregationist candidacy for the presidency in 1948 and the fact that even though he was a longtime opponent of racial equality, he fathered a child with a black teenage housekeeper. But Thurmond also lent his name to the so-called Thurmond Rule, according to which Senate action on judicial confirmations is supposed to stop several months before a presidential election. The rule - actually a custom that sometimes has been honored in the breach - goes back to 1968, when Thurmond and other Republicans held up action on President Johnson's nomination of Abe Fortas to be chief justice of the United States.
OPINION
May 3, 2005 | David Greenberg, David Greenberg, a history professor at Rutgers University, researched the politics of court appointments as a visiting scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
To justify banning Senate filibusters in judicial nomination debates, Republicans are claiming support from history. Until now, say Republicans such as Sen. John Kyl and former Sen. Bob Dole, no one has used filibusters to block nominees to the federal courts. Because Democrats have broken an unwritten rule, their logic goes, Republicans are forced to change written ones. But the charge that filibustering judicial appointments is unprecedented is false.
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