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Structural Engineer

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BUSINESS
September 27, 1993 | Researched by JANICE L. JONES / Los Angeles Times
Name: Gbolahan Ogunbiyi Firm: Ogunbiyi Associates Thumbs up: "I like the challenges presented by each project. No two are exactly alike." Thumbs down: "I honestly can't think of any." Next step: "To build my company up and to take on more transportation projects." Advice: "It is very important, especially during high school, to devote time to mathematics and science, particularly physics. After college, it is best to work for a small firm where you will work on a variety of design projects."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council committee agreed Tuesday to push forward a proposal to identify all the apartment buildings in the city that have a certain type of wood frame that is vulnerable to collapse in a major earthquake. Reporting to a City Council planning committee, Ifa Kashefi, chief of the engineering bureau at the Department of Building and Safety, laid out a plan to winnow out these so-called soft story wood-frame buildings among the 29,000 apartment buildings across the city that were built before 1978.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roy G. Johnston, a structural engineer and seismic expert whose firm, Brandow & Johnston Associates, helped design such landmarks as the Los Angeles Sports Arena, the Los Angeles Convention Center, the Transamerica Tower and much of the USC campus, died of natural causes March 13 at his home in Santa Barbara. He was 94. Johnston and his partner, the late George E. Brandow, founded their structural and civil engineering firm in 1945.
OPINION
April 5, 2013
Re "Tall order for Watts Towers," April 1 Simon Rodia was a great artist and dreamer who built the wonderfully decorated Watts Towers all by himself. Unfortunately, they are made of relatively flexible steel and rigid and brittle concrete, mortar and tile. The towers will move and deflect as they respond to the weather and earthquake forces, and in so doing, the rigid elements of the cladding will break, unable to physically flex with the steel's movements. Engineers have always struggled with the balance of strength and stiffness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
The signature sign that hangs above the marquee at the entrance to the landmark Rialto Theatre has South Pasadena officials worried. City building inspectors say they fear the blade-shaped sign may have been weakened in recent windstorms and could present a danger to pedestrians and cars. Michael Krakower, a structural engineer hired by Rialto owner Landmark Theatres, will offer the city a report on Monday, recommending either that the sign be saved or that it should go. The theater, which opened in 1925, screened its last film in 2010.
MAGAZINE
November 24, 1996
So skycaps at LAX CALL THE Theme Restaurant "the spider"(L.A. Speak, So SoCal by Sue McAllister, Oct. 20). My husband, Richard R. Bradshaw, was the structural engineer during the construction of that landmark. I guess that henceforth he will be known as Spiderman. Chanin Hale Bradshaw Northridge
NEWS
July 6, 1987
Six weeks before an apartment building under construction collapsed in Bridgeport, Conn., an engineer found cracks in a concrete floor slab and deformities in steel collars holding the slabs in place, newly released documents showed. An engineer hired by the Post-Telegram Newspapers of Bridgeport said the structural engineer's March 6 report pointed up possible weaknesses in the L'Ambiance Plaza building, the Sunday Post reported. The building collapsed April 23, killing 28 construction workers.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The earthquake in the San Francisco area has dramatized the importance of--and need for--a group of normally anonymous professionals known in the building business as structural engineers. They are civil engineers who are supposed to ensure that buildings such as schools and high-rises are constructed to withstand major quakes of the magnitude that rattled the Bay Area late Tuesday afternoon. It measured 6.9.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eugene D. Birnbaum, an innovative, self-taught structural engineer who helped design more than 20,000 homes, high-rises, restaurants, bridges and industrial buildings in Southern California during a 50-year career, died May 30 in Los Angeles. He was 83. The cause of death was an infection after hip surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said his son, Michael H. Birnbaum.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Head
Dennis and Annie Reed's house, set among tall oak trees in a part of Glendale called Chevy Chase Canyon, floats almost 35 feet above a running stream. But what's most noteworthy about the 1,500-square-foot residence isn't what flows below but what rises above: The structure is supported by 10 ponderosa pine poles, a kit of parts based on a Japanese building technique from the 16th century. At a time when interest in contemporary prefab and kit housing continues to grow, the Reeds' 1979 home stands as an intriguing precursor.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Head
Dennis and Annie Reed's house, set among tall oak trees in a part of Glendale called Chevy Chase Canyon, floats almost 35 feet above a running stream. But what's most noteworthy about the 1,500-square-foot residence isn't what flows below but what rises above: The structure is supported by 10 ponderosa pine poles, a kit of parts based on a Japanese building technique from the 16th century. At a time when interest in contemporary prefab and kit housing continues to grow, the Reeds' 1979 home stands as an intriguing precursor.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Who needs a cabin in the woods when you can find one in the city? I recently came across a little wooden homestead clinging to the side of a multistory building at 447 Bush St. in downtown San Francisco. The lights were on behind curtained windows, and I half expected to see the little chimney puffing smoke. My first impulse was to book the room for at least a night (some have tried), but I was fooled by the structure that sprouts from the side of the Hotel des Arts and floats above Le Central restaurant . It's strictly for art's sake, a project called "Manifest Destiny!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
The signature sign that hangs above the marquee at the entrance to the landmark Rialto Theatre has South Pasadena officials worried. City building inspectors say they fear the blade-shaped sign may have been weakened in recent windstorms and could present a danger to pedestrians and cars. Michael Krakower, a structural engineer hired by Rialto owner Landmark Theatres, will offer the city a report on Monday, recommending either that the sign be saved or that it should go. The theater, which opened in 1925, screened its last film in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
It began more than three years ago, when a half-ton piece of stucco fell from the Theme Building at Los Angeles International Airport. Engineers scrutinized the structure and discovered the arched landmark ? the inspiration for the jet-set architecture in "The Jetsons" ? was at risk for collapse or irreparable damage in an earthquake. The discovery came not from a government mandate but because the airport's owner, Los Angeles World Airports, a city agency, decided to reevaluate the structural fitness of the half-century-old structure in light of the stucco failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roy G. Johnston, a structural engineer and seismic expert whose firm, Brandow & Johnston Associates, helped design such landmarks as the Los Angeles Sports Arena, the Los Angeles Convention Center, the Transamerica Tower and much of the USC campus, died of natural causes March 13 at his home in Santa Barbara. He was 94. Johnston and his partner, the late George E. Brandow, founded their structural and civil engineering firm in 1945.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2004 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
Nearly half of California's court buildings evaluated for seismic safety are at risk of partial collapse if there is a significant earthquake, according to a new report by the state Administrative Office of the Courts. Of 300 court buildings assessed by structural engineers, 147 could pose a substantial risk to life and sustain substantial structural damage. Only 72 reached the state's seismic safety bar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1995 | SCOTT HADLY
Three retired civil engineers have been appointed to hear an appeal by a Moorpark landlord who has refused to make repairs of his earthquake-damaged building to city specifications. Don Wokal, who owns a building in the 100 block of High Street in the city's historic downtown, hired an engineer to repair the building soon after the Northridge earthquake in January, 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lynn S. Beedle, 85, a structural engineer who created the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat and championed "an elegant tower, perhaps the tallest in the world" to replace the World Trade Center destroyed by terrorists in 2001, died Thursday. Beedle died of natural causes in his sleep at his home in Hellertown, Pa. A native of Orland, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lynn S. Beedle, 85, a structural engineer who created the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat and championed "an elegant tower, perhaps the tallest in the world" to replace the World Trade Center destroyed by terrorists in 2001, died Thursday. Beedle died of natural causes in his sleep at his home in Hellertown, Pa. A native of Orland, Calif.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the World Trade Center complex was built a generation ago, among the engineering marvels was a seven-level basement and an underground wall called "the bathtub" to keep the Hudson River at bay. Now the basement--which provided parking and dozens of shops and offices--is jammed with concrete, steel and other compressed debris that rocketed downward when the twin 110-story towers collapsed.
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