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Structural Impediments Initiative

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BUSINESS
June 4, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is becoming increasingly annoyed at Japan for what it considers Tokyo's backsliding on promises made in the sweeping Structural Impediments Initiative, intended to open Japan's markets and signed by both sides on April 5.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 1992 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
As many an American inventor has found out the hard way, build a better mousetrap and companies in Japan will beat a path to their own patent office to claim some variation on the idea as their own. What's more, a well-made, inexpensive, made-in-Japan version of that mousetrap might emerge later and win market share in the United States. But the days may be numbered when a Japanese firm can easily imitate a foreign discovery with only minor mutation.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were billed as the most extraordinary trade negotiations the United States and Japan had ever attempted. For the first time ever, two sovereign countries dared to demand fundamental changes in what had always been considered domestic matters immune from foreign interference. The two sides billed the "Structural Impediments Initiative" as a way to sandblast the stubborn impediments to trade in both countries.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
U.S. and Japanese negotiators meet here Thursday and Friday to review progress in removing barriers to free trade and investment under the so-called Structural Impediments Initiative talks. Among items on the agenda: Japan's keiretsu system--the web of interlocking corporate shareholdings that allegedly discriminates against outsiders. Discussions are also expected to focus on limits to foreign direct investment in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990
Tom Clancy has been noted for his technical accuracy in his exciting novels. So it was with great disappointment that I noted his shallow article (Opinion, April 1) had no other apparent intent than to "bash" the U.S.-Japan relationship and all those who are trying to make it workable. Clancy states, "We are the customer--what right does Japan have telling us what is wrong with America?" Does he not know of the negotiations of the Structural Impediments Initiative? The United States is telling Japan what is wrong with them, which by the way I support.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shintaro Ishihara, author of the controversial book "The Japan That Can Say No," has presented his own 109 demands for American economic reform and warned that opening the Japanese market, by itself, would not eliminate the trade imbalance between the two nations. Ishihara told foreign correspondents Friday that he agrees with U.S. negotiators who are demanding that Japan dramatically increase spending on public works to improve living standards and pull in imports.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | From United Press International
The average Japanese family had stashed away $86,250 in savings as of 1989, confirming Japan's place as one of the world's most frugal countries, the government has announced. The average family added 15.3% to its already large nest egg in 1989, the highest growth rate since 1979, the Management and Coordination Agency reported Friday. The United States has complained in trade negotiations that Japan's high savings rate is a contributing factor to the massive U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu said Wednesday he will try to convince President Bush at their Palm Springs summit that Japan is making progress both in opening its markets and in cutting its trade surplus with the United States. In a nationally televised news conference after naming a new Cabinet, Kaifu offered no hint of new concessions, despite warnings from Washington that a breakthrough in solving economic disputes is needed before relations "get out of hand."
BUSINESS
February 24, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials told the United States on Friday to "put your house in order" and improve the competitiveness of American industry as a third round of talks aimed at dismantling impediments to U.S.-Japan trade closed on an acrimonious note. The officials told a U.S. trade delegation that "much more can be done" to reduce the U.S. budget deficit, a Foreign Ministry official said. S. Linn Williams, deputy U.S.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
U.S. and Japanese negotiators meet here Thursday and Friday to review progress in removing barriers to free trade and investment under the so-called Structural Impediments Initiative talks. Among items on the agenda: Japan's keiretsu system--the web of interlocking corporate shareholdings that allegedly discriminates against outsiders. Discussions are also expected to focus on limits to foreign direct investment in Japan.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States, in an attempt to reduce its trade deficit and compete effectively with Japanese manufacturers, is trying to break up the system of exclusive relationships between Japanese auto makers and their parts suppliers. But the Japanese system is superior to U.S. and European practices, according to Joseph T. Gorman, chairman and chief executive of TRW Inc. And TRW hopes to take part in the Japanese system of "family" relationships among companies.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ministry of International Trade and Industry, acknowledging that Japan's economic might is stirring "growing anxiety, even fear, in the international community," pledged Thursday to switch the focus of its policies in the 1990s from promoting production to producing a better life for the Japanese people.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu late Wednesday approved a compromise on a key issue blocking agreement in U.S.-Japan trade negotiations and telephoned President Bush to seek his acceptance of the new proposal. But, as negotiators recessed at 5:50 a.m. today after a marathon 21 hours of talks, a Foreign Ministry official said, "Not all of the big issues have been resolved."
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shintaro Ishihara, author of the controversial book "The Japan That Can Say No," has presented his own 109 demands for American economic reform and warned that opening the Japanese market, by itself, would not eliminate the trade imbalance between the two nations. Ishihara told foreign correspondents Friday that he agrees with U.S. negotiators who are demanding that Japan dramatically increase spending on public works to improve living standards and pull in imports.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu late Wednesday approved a compromise on a key issue blocking agreement in U.S.-Japan trade negotiations and telephoned President Bush to seek his acceptance of the new proposal. But, as negotiators recessed at 5:50 a.m. today after a marathon 21 hours of talks, a Foreign Ministry official said, "Not all of the big issues have been resolved."
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu will interrupt parliamentary proceedings to make an urgent trip to Palm Springs to meet President Bush this Friday and Saturday, the U.S. and Japanese governments announced Saturday. The unexpected trip--unprecedented because of the complete lack of advance planning and its timing right after Kaifu delivers a traditional policy speech Friday--underscores a rising crisis in U.S.-Japanese relations.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | ART PINE and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration moved Wednesday to step up pressure on Japan to end what it considers backsliding on key promises that Japan made last April in a high-level accord designed to ease trade tensions between the two countries. U.S. officials said Secretary of State James A. Baker III plans to warn Japan of the growing U.S. frustration--and to demand prompt action by the Tokyo government--during a meeting Friday with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is becoming increasingly annoyed at Japan for what it considers Tokyo's backsliding on promises made in the sweeping Structural Impediments Initiative, intended to open Japan's markets and signed by both sides on April 5.
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