Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStuart Arnold
IN THE NEWS

Stuart Arnold

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ex-Forbes Publisher to Head PC Week: Softbank Corp.'s Ziff-Davis Publishing Co. named former Fortune magazine publisher Stuart Arnold as publisher of PC Week. Arnold starts July 9, filling a position that's been vacant since May, when Don Byrnes was named executive vice president of the Business Media Group. Arnold served as publisher of Time Warner Inc.'s Fortune magazine from January 1994 to April 1996.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ex-Forbes Publisher to Head PC Week: Softbank Corp.'s Ziff-Davis Publishing Co. named former Fortune magazine publisher Stuart Arnold as publisher of PC Week. Arnold starts July 9, filling a position that's been vacant since May, when Don Byrnes was named executive vice president of the Business Media Group. Arnold served as publisher of Time Warner Inc.'s Fortune magazine from January 1994 to April 1996.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 4, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fortune Names First Female Publisher: Sports Illustrated advertising sales executive Jolene Sykes, 46, succeeds Stuart Arnold, 44, Fortune's publisher since January 1994, the biweekly business magazine said. Arnold will be leaving New York-based Time Inc., owner of Fortune. The appointment was effective immediately. Sykes most recently served as Sports Illustrated's Southeast regional advertising sales director, a post she has held at the Time Inc. publication since 1993. Sykes joined Time Inc.
NEWS
September 25, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
As they have in revolution and Civil War, and after earthquake and fire, the bells of St. Michael's Episcopal Church rang out Sunday to celebrate this tattered and torn city's remarkable survival in the wake of Hurricane Hugo. "We may have been bent but we're not broken," said Christopher Cotton, the church's choirmaster, who led four parishioners and a visitor up 18 floors of narrow, winding stairs to manually ring the 225-year-old carillon bells, which usually work electrically.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|