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Stuart Bloomberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Breaking with the networks' standard practice of promoting from within the programming ranks, Capital Cities/ABC Inc. on Thursday named Robert Iger from its business affairs side as president of the entertainment division. The 38-year-old former executive vice president of the ABC Television Network Group immediately declared, "I do not come in with a program strategy."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC sought to shift the focus from ongoing management turmoil at the network to the challenge of rebuilding its weakened prime-time lineup, during a session between senior management and television critics in Pasadena Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC sought to shift the focus from ongoing management turmoil at the network to the challenge of rebuilding its weakened prime-time lineup, during a session between senior management and television critics in Pasadena Wednesday.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking a way out of its ratings slump, ABC is appointing network veteran Stuart Bloomberg to the top position overseeing the network's beleaguered prime-time programming arm, sources said Monday. The move is a tacit recognition that ABC Entertainment President Jamie Tarses, 33, who came to the network one year ago today, wasn't entirely prepared for the top job and that the division needed more management depth to dig its way out of trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1990 | JOHN LIPPMAN
A black-and-white photograph of Fred Savage and Danica McKellar, the teen-age stars of "The Wonder Years," hangs on a wall behind Ted Harbert's circular desk. Harbert, the fast-talking, 35-year-old executive vice president of ABC Entertainment, explains why Savage and McKellar deserve space alongside pictures of his wife and 1-year-old daughter, Emily. He turns to Savage's Boy Scout visage.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking a way out of its ratings slump, ABC is appointing network veteran Stuart Bloomberg to the top position overseeing the network's beleaguered prime-time programming arm, sources said Monday. The move is a tacit recognition that ABC Entertainment President Jamie Tarses, 33, who came to the network one year ago today, wasn't entirely prepared for the top job and that the division needed more management depth to dig its way out of trouble.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1995
Stuart Bloomberg has been named to the new position of president for television creative services at Capital Cities/ABC Inc. His responsibilities include the overall development of programming; he will retain responsibilities for all prime-time series development at ABC Entertainment through the 1995-96 season. Also, Michael Rosenfeld, a television agent at Creative Artists Agency, has been named to the new position of senior vice president at ABC Entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Talk show hostess Oprah Winfrey is in negotiation with ABC for a type-cast situation comedy that would be taped in Chicago, a network official said Monday. Stuart Bloomberg, ABC vice president for comedy and variety series development, said Winfrey would play a single young woman who is the hostess of a daily talk show. Winfrey, who will continue her real-life talk show, will make a pilot program next month if an agreement is reached, Bloomberg said.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC has sent a memo to executives, producers and casting agents urging them to make diversity a priority in the development of current and new programming. In the two-page correspondence from network co-Chairmen Stuart Bloomberg and Lloyd Braun, the executives reiterated the Walt Disney Co.-owned network's commitment to increasing diversity, suggesting that "agencies, managers, guilds and the production companies use all available means to expand the pool of candidates."
BUSINESS
November 14, 1995
Former Samuel Goldwyn executive Steven Rabiner has joined Di Novi Pictures as president of production. * Paramount Digital Entertainment has promoted Leonard J. Washington II to executive vice president and producer. * Robert Shultz has been named vice president of corporate credit and customer finance for Sony Pictures Entertainment. * Christina Kounelias has been promoted to senior vice president of marketing for New Line Cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1990 | JOHN LIPPMAN
A black-and-white photograph of Fred Savage and Danica McKellar, the teen-age stars of "The Wonder Years," hangs on a wall behind Ted Harbert's circular desk. Harbert, the fast-talking, 35-year-old executive vice president of ABC Entertainment, explains why Savage and McKellar deserve space alongside pictures of his wife and 1-year-old daughter, Emily. He turns to Savage's Boy Scout visage.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Breaking with the networks' standard practice of promoting from within the programming ranks, Capital Cities/ABC Inc. on Thursday named Robert Iger from its business affairs side as president of the entertainment division. The 38-year-old former executive vice president of the ABC Television Network Group immediately declared, "I do not come in with a program strategy."
BUSINESS
July 9, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a cost-cutting move aimed at improving the stock price of the world's second-largest media company, Walt Disney Co. is restructuring its network television operations by combining them into a single unit at ABC. Walt Disney Television Studio, including Buena Vista Television Productions, will be merged with ABC's prime-time division to form a new unit called ABC Entertainment Television Group.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN and JEFF KAYE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Unable to come up with any hit shows to pull CBS out of its prime-time ratings doldrums, Earle H. (Kim) LeMasters resigned Thursday after two years as president of the third-place TV network's entertainment division. A successor was not immediately named to take charge of the development, production and scheduling of programs at the network, which is running third in the prime-time ratings for the third season in a row.
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