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Stuart Canin

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July 6, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
When violinist Stuart Canin left his Los Angeles home for China only two days before the bloody June 4 massacre in Beijing, he was prepared to teach Chinese music students to interpret such Western masters as Beethoven, Bach, Brahms and Mozart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
When violinist Stuart Canin left his Los Angeles home for China only two days before the bloody June 4 massacre in Beijing, he was prepared to teach Chinese music students to interpret such Western masters as Beethoven, Bach, Brahms and Mozart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
For brass lovers, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center was the place to be Saturday night. Clarion, blooperless blares and toots resounded all evening as composer-conductor John Williams led the enthusiastic Glendale Symphony in a (mainly) Tchaikovsky/Williams potpourri. Tchaikovsky's 1883 "Coronation March" stirred the public as it warmed up embouchures. His Violin Concerto featured solicitous support from Williams for soloist Stuart Canin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1989
South Bay music and theater groups have scheduled auditions for prospective new members. * The Ready for Prime Time Players, Norris Theatre's senior citizen touring company, will hold auditions for its fall production, "Spoon River Anthology," from 7 to 10 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at the Norris Theatre, 27570 Crossfield Drive, Rolling Hills Estates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1988 | HERBERT GLASS
The Townleigh Room of Bullocks Wilshire in Los Angeles, its ecstatic Kandinsky-like mural (by Gjurana Stojano) unfortunately obscured by a reflective shell, was the scene of the next to last of this season's Chamber Music in Historic Sites programs. Participating was the Da Camera Players, an ensemble of shifting membership but always under the lively direction of pianist Delores Stevens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1987
A violinist, a trombonist and a bassoonist are the winners of the third annual Pasadena Instrumental Competition. Sponsored by the Pasadena Junior Philharmonic Committee, a fund-raising support group of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the competition offers cash prizes and scholarships in a variety of categories. The prizes will be awarded at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at the Garland Theater of the Polytechnic School in Pasadena. The winners will also perform, with a reception following the concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1988 | TERRY McQUILKIN
The agenda for the first of this season's Sunday morning Croissants and Coffee and Chamber Music at the Taper programs, sponsored by the California Chamber Symphony Society, reflected a penchant for the tried-and-true this weekend. If artistic director Henri Temianka is to be criticized for a lack of adventurousness, however, it must be added that he is knowledgeable about the music and utterly sincere in his love for it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Daniel Lewis offered a menu of meat and potatoes at the concert by the Glendale Symphony in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Saturday. The fare leaned unashamedly toward the familiar and the lyrical--music easily digested, if you will. Brahms' Violin Concerto stood as the centerpiece, with the tune-heavy "Rosamunde" Overture by Schubert and Symphony in C by Bizet on either side. Though the Brahms was far and away the most substantial work, it did not emerge as the most successful.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1986 | MARC SHULGOLD
Mahler's Symphony No. 9 is no walk in the park--for conductor, orchestra or audience. Nonetheless, even at a whopping and intense 90 minutes, the work is not nearly as imposing as music director Mehli Mehta described it in notes he provided for a concert by his American Youth Symphony in UCLA's Royce Hall on Sunday. Hearing the Ninth, he wrote, "will not at all be like enjoying the great Beethoven, Schubert . . . symphonies."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
For a conductor who can't seem to lead the band without falling into a numbing regularity of beat, Lalo Schifrin chose a risky program Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to open the 63rd season of the Glendale Symphony. Virtually every work the guest conductor led demanded the liveliest exercising of rhythm. And while the orchestra seemed fully capable of rising to the occasion, Schifrin's time-beating turned the evening into a routine and undistinguished affair.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1988 | John Henken
Though John Currie and the Los Angeles Master Chorale finished their season at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Saturday evening with reduced forces in two Requiems, there was nothing funereal about the occasion. Rather, it was a case of something old, something new and both solidly done. The new--relatively, of course--was John Rutter's edition of Faure's Requiem. This reduces the orchestra largely to organ and low strings, with harp, solo violin, timpani and some winds.
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