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Stuart Dybek

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May 20, 1990 | Eric Larsen, Larsen is the author of the novel "An American Memory" (Anchor paper) and has contributed frequently to Book Review. and
Ten years ago, Stuart Dybek published a collection of Chicago-set stories, "Childhood and Other Neighborhoods," receiving for that achievement the 1981 PEN Hemingway Award. Now he comes forth with another story volume, again set in Chicago, and again about childhood and coming-of-age.
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May 29, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The title of Nick Dybek's debut novel, "When Captain Flint Was Still a Good Man," hints at transitions to come, and the phrase "was still" suggests that the changes will not be good. Flint, if you've forgotten your children's classics, was the captain of the Walrus pirate ship, the man who buried the gold around which revolves the plot of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Treasure Island. " In Dybek's novel, protagonist Cal Bollings' father began reading aloud from that book before bedtime the summer the boy was 8 years old. The favorite story quickly became too familiar, so a father-son tradition emerged in which the father sent the boy off to sleep with conjured tales about Flint and his life before he turned bad, buried his treasure and killed his crew.
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NEWS
September 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Author Stuart Dybek, already a winner this week of a MacArthur "genius" grant, is this year's recipient of the $30,000 Rea Award for "originality and influence" on the short story. Dybek, 65, is a Chicago native known for such story collections as "The Coast of Chicago" and "I Sailed With Magellan." His previous honors include the PEN/Bernard Malamud Prize and four O'Henry awards. The Rea Award, announced Tuesday, was established in 1986 by Michael M.
NEWS
September 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Author Stuart Dybek, already a winner this week of a MacArthur "genius" grant, is this year's recipient of the $30,000 Rea Award for "originality and influence" on the short story. Dybek, 65, is a Chicago native known for such story collections as "The Coast of Chicago" and "I Sailed With Magellan." His previous honors include the PEN/Bernard Malamud Prize and four O'Henry awards. The Rea Award, announced Tuesday, was established in 1986 by Michael M.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The title of Nick Dybek's debut novel, "When Captain Flint Was Still a Good Man," hints at transitions to come, and the phrase "was still" suggests that the changes will not be good. Flint, if you've forgotten your children's classics, was the captain of the Walrus pirate ship, the man who buried the gold around which revolves the plot of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Treasure Island. " In Dybek's novel, protagonist Cal Bollings' father began reading aloud from that book before bedtime the summer the boy was 8 years old. The favorite story quickly became too familiar, so a father-son tradition emerged in which the father sent the boy off to sleep with conjured tales about Flint and his life before he turned bad, buried his treasure and killed his crew.
BOOKS
May 1, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
PRIZE STORIES 1994: The O. Henry Awards edited and with an introduction by William Abrahams. (Doubleday: $25; 382 pp.) Similar to the film industry's Oscar, the O. Henry Awards for short stories are almost soothing in their predictability. Readers are treated to a collection of high-quality, main-stream, literary fiction that has plenty of sand with no grit, depth with no real price. That's not to say some of the work here is anything short of brilliant.
BOOKS
January 30, 2005 | Carol Muske-Dukes
Belongings Poems Sandra M. Gilbert W.W. Norton: 112 pp., $23.95 The title of Sandra M. Gilbert's new collection, "Belongings," is perfect for this collection of fierce, grieving poems, these dark and bright elegiac celebrations that include haunting sequences of sonnets. What belongs to us and to whom we belong -- our possessions and what possesses us -- are Gilbert's lyrical obsessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010
MOVIES "Stranded in Canton" There may be no better documentarian of American weirdness than the photographer William Eggleston. With "Stranded in Canton," he finally got around to editing the 30 hours of film he shot with director Robert Gordon that depicts the shady, hopeless and hopeful denizens of bars, alleys and back roads of New Orleans and Memphis. It's preceded by the unveiling of a new Eggleston print, "Untitled ( Los Angeles) 1994/2010," and an appearance at LACMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The year 2014 is a banner one for big readers. That's according to the readers at the Millions, whose editors have compiled a list of the books they're looking forward to -- 89 titles in all. Think about that for a moment: 89 titles. I bet you didn't read 89 books last year -- I'm a professional and I didn't -- and the Millions is telling us there will be 89 excellent books to read in the year ahead. And their list only goes to August. The list includes novels and short story collections, memoirs and criticism.
BOOKS
May 20, 1990 | Eric Larsen, Larsen is the author of the novel "An American Memory" (Anchor paper) and has contributed frequently to Book Review. and
Ten years ago, Stuart Dybek published a collection of Chicago-set stories, "Childhood and Other Neighborhoods," receiving for that achievement the 1981 PEN Hemingway Award. Now he comes forth with another story volume, again set in Chicago, and again about childhood and coming-of-age.
NEWS
November 1, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
In a Halloween ceremony in the staid elegance of the stately old Pierpont Morgan Library here, 10 winners were announced in what is believed to be this country's largest privately supported program of individual support exclusively for writers. The awards, of $25,000 each, marked the first year of the Whiting Foundation Writers' Program.
BOOKS
September 8, 1985 | Sharon Dirlam, Dirlam is a Times staff writer.
A kid in a candy shop clutching a 10-dollar bill could not be happier than a short-story fan when the annual O. Henry awards are wrapped up in one delicious package and presented in book form. Oddly enough, one doesn't even have to agree that the 21 selections (by E. P. Dutton senior editor William Abrahams) are this year's best that money could buy. For the most part, they are individually excellent and compose an eclectic and possibly even eccentric amalgam. Where is the humor?
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