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Stuart E Berlin

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NEWS
April 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
A jury continued deliberations Tuesday in the case of three businessmen indicted in the Pentagon corruption scandal. For a second day, the jury, praised by U.S. District Judge Richard Williams for its diligence, weighed evidence in the case against Dale Schnittjer, Eugene R. Sullivan and George H. Kaub, former vice presidents of Teledyne Electronics of Newbury Park, Calif. Much of the evidence was in the form of tape-recorded telephone conversations of the defendants. The tapes were made available to jurors if they wanted to listen to them again.
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NEWS
June 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Consultant William L. Parkin and the former Navy engineer he bribed were given 26-month prison terms Friday for illegally scheming to help two companies get lucrative Pentagon contracts. Parkin, 65, and Stuart E. Berlin, 51, also were each fined $25,000 and ordered to serve two years of supervised probation after their release from prison. Berlin said his crime was "the worst mistake that I ever made in my life." He added: "The last year has been a living hell for me." Minimum Security U.S. District Judge Claude Hilton said both defendants, who have cooperated with the Justice Department's Operation Ill Wind investigation of Pentagon procurement fraud since pleading guilty, could serve their time in minimum-security prisons.
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NEWS
June 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Consultant William L. Parkin and the former Navy engineer he bribed were given 26-month prison terms Friday for illegally scheming to help two companies get lucrative Pentagon contracts. Parkin, 65, and Stuart E. Berlin, 51, also were each fined $25,000 and ordered to serve two years of supervised probation after their release from prison. Berlin said his crime was "the worst mistake that I ever made in my life." He added: "The last year has been a living hell for me." Minimum Security U.S. District Judge Claude Hilton said both defendants, who have cooperated with the Justice Department's Operation Ill Wind investigation of Pentagon procurement fraud since pleading guilty, could serve their time in minimum-security prisons.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
A jury continued deliberations Tuesday in the case of three businessmen indicted in the Pentagon corruption scandal. For a second day, the jury, praised by U.S. District Judge Richard Williams for its diligence, weighed evidence in the case against Dale Schnittjer, Eugene R. Sullivan and George H. Kaub, former vice presidents of Teledyne Electronics of Newbury Park, Calif. Much of the evidence was in the form of tape-recorded telephone conversations of the defendants. The tapes were made available to jurors if they wanted to listen to them again.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
A somber Fred H. Lackner of Woodland Hills, Calif., pleaded guilty Friday to federal conspiracy, wire fraud and bribery charges in the continuing Ill Wind investigation into corruption in Pentagon weapons-buying. Lackner, a 52-year-old free-lance defense consultant, admitted paying about $6,000 in bribes to a Navy official for inside information on military contracts. U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton read the three charges to Lackner and asked him how he pleaded.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Teledyne Industries Inc. Thursday pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy charges in the Pentagon Ill Wind corruption case and agreed to pay more than $4.3 million in fines, reimbursements and court costs. In addition, the first government official indicted in the case, former Navy purchasing officer Stuart E. Berlin, pleaded guilty to three felony counts of bribery, fraud and conspiracy for his role in a scheme to illegally steer a Navy electronics contract to Teledyne.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
A former Navy official revealed Tuesday that the extent of bribery in the Pentagon procurement scandal is wider than previously believed, testifying that he accepted tens of thousands of dollars in bribes from defense consultants and contractors over the last 10 years. Among those allegedly paying bribes were several persons not previously linked publicly to the case, including Los Angeles businessman Manuel R. Caldera, former owner of a defense contracting firm. The disclosure by Stuart E.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Jovial, easygoing and well-connected in the Washington, D.C., military Establishment. That's how Fred H. Lackner, a Woodland Hills defense consultant indicted Friday in the Pentagon fraud scandal was known among friends, colleagues and employers in Southern California. But a different picture of the man emerges from the multiple-count indictment for bribery, conspiracy, wire fraud and racketeering that was handed down by a federal grand jury in Virginia.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The Navy on Tuesday suspended procurement specialist Stuart E. Berlin without pay for his alleged role in providing inside information about Navy contracts to a number of consultants and companies implicated in the Pentagon fraud scandal. Berlin, a $74,304-a-year electronics engineer in the Naval Air Systems Command, is the first Pentagon official indicted in the ongoing investigation into corruption in the military procurement program.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The government Friday brought the first charges in the Pentagon fraud case, accusing a unit of Teledyne Inc., three Teledyne executives, a Navy official and two defense consultants with crimes that include racketeering, conspiracy, bribery and theft of government property. The indictments followed guilty pleas earlier Friday on similar charges from defense supplier Hazeltine Corp., two of its former officers and a Washington marketing official for Teledyne. Hazeltine agreed to pay $1.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
A former Navy official revealed Tuesday that the extent of bribery in the Pentagon procurement scandal is wider than previously believed, testifying that he accepted tens of thousands of dollars in bribes from defense consultants and contractors over the last 10 years. Among those allegedly paying bribes were several persons not previously linked publicly to the case, including Los Angeles businessman Manuel R. Caldera, former owner of a defense contracting firm. The disclosure by Stuart E.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
A somber Fred H. Lackner of Woodland Hills, Calif., pleaded guilty Friday to federal conspiracy, wire fraud and bribery charges in the continuing Ill Wind investigation into corruption in Pentagon weapons-buying. Lackner, a 52-year-old free-lance defense consultant, admitted paying about $6,000 in bribes to a Navy official for inside information on military contracts. U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton read the three charges to Lackner and asked him how he pleaded.
NEWS
March 24, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Teledyne Industries Inc. Thursday pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy charges in the Pentagon Ill Wind corruption case and agreed to pay more than $4.3 million in fines, reimbursements and court costs. In addition, the first government official indicted in the case, former Navy purchasing officer Stuart E. Berlin, pleaded guilty to three felony counts of bribery, fraud and conspiracy for his role in a scheme to illegally steer a Navy electronics contract to Teledyne.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The Navy on Tuesday suspended procurement specialist Stuart E. Berlin without pay for his alleged role in providing inside information about Navy contracts to a number of consultants and companies implicated in the Pentagon fraud scandal. Berlin, a $74,304-a-year electronics engineer in the Naval Air Systems Command, is the first Pentagon official indicted in the ongoing investigation into corruption in the military procurement program.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The government Friday brought the first charges in the Pentagon fraud case, accusing a unit of Teledyne Inc., three Teledyne executives, a Navy official and two defense consultants with crimes that include racketeering, conspiracy, bribery and theft of government property. The indictments followed guilty pleas earlier Friday on similar charges from defense supplier Hazeltine Corp., two of its former officers and a Washington marketing official for Teledyne. Hazeltine agreed to pay $1.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writers
Government prosecutors, convinced that Woodland Hills aerospace-salesman-turned-lobbyist Fred H. Lackner is a "small fry" in the massive Pentagon fraud scandal, offered him a deal if he would help them build cases against others, his lawyer told The Times. But the offer was rejected, Lackner's Orange County attorney, William Dougherty, said in an interview, because "my client never paid a cent to anyone." Dougherty met last week with assistants to U.S. Atty. Henry E.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Jovial, easygoing and well-connected in the Washington, D.C., military Establishment. That's how Fred H. Lackner, a Woodland Hills defense consultant indicted Friday in the Pentagon fraud scandal was known among friends, colleagues and employers in Southern California. But a different picture of the man emerges from the multiple-count indictment for bribery, conspiracy, wire fraud and racketeering that was handed down by a federal grand jury in Virginia.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
A Navy purchasing official received regular payments from consultants working on behalf of a major defense contractor in exchange for his aid in bidding on a $16-million contract for Navy electronic equipment, prosecutors charged in court documents unsealed Tuesday in New York.
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