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Stuart K Spencer

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NEWS
August 9, 1985
Actor Fess Parker, best known for his television portrayal of frontier fighter Davy Crockett, says he is exploring a run for the U.S. Senate from California in 1986. Parker, 59, said Thursday he had "done a lot of thinking about this and find I'm intrigued about it." Parker told the Associated Press in an interview that he was interested in running in next June's Republican primary for the chance to take on Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston next November. He said he had talked with Stuart K.
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NATIONAL
July 13, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak
Since announcing her resignation, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has been pummeled by critics who have called her incoherent, a quitter, a joke and a "political train wreck." And those were fellow Republicans talking. Palin has been a polarizing figure from the moment she stepped off the tundra into the bright lights last summer as John McCain's surprise vice presidential running mate. Some of that hostility could be expected, given the hyper-partisanship of today's politics.
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NEWS
September 2, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stuart K. Spencer, a prominent Republican political consultant who is managing the campaign of GOP vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle, was hired by Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega to lobby for him on a number of issues in 1985 and 1986, according to a published report.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a further sign of the GOP's internal reckoning over immigration and related issues, one of the Republican Party's most revered strategists has issued an unusual open letter warning of "political suicide" if the party fails to heal its rift with Latino voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political consultant Stuart K. Spencer, who has managed Ronald Reagan's campaigns and has known the Reagans since 1965, added his voice Thursday to the chorus of denunciations of Kitty Kelley and her unauthorized biography of Nancy Reagan. Spencer, who is quoted several times in the book, said he never talked to Kelley. Others apparently did talk about events in which Spencer was involved, but he said some of the quotes attributed to him are "completely inaccurate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
Veteran Republican strategist Stuart K. Spencer, a close adviser to presidents and governors over the last several decades, had some advice Tuesday for new GOP national Chairman Lee Atwater: "He's got to spend less time with (blues guitarist) B.B. King and more time with national committeemen and committeewomen," Spencer said with a wink. "And he'll do all right." Then, directing his comments to two reporters, he added, "Put that in there: He'll do all right."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Stuart K. Spencer, a prominent Republican political consultant from Orange County who is managing the campaign of GOP vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle, was hired by Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega to lobby for him on a number of issues in 1985 and 1986, according to a published report.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | KEITH LOVE and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
After weeks of giving Republican nominee George Bush an open field in California, Michael S. Dukakis' presidential campaign began blocking and tackling on Monday. Minutes before Bush spoke beside the San Diego harbor, Democratic Sen. Dennis DeConcini of Arizona held a press conference nearby and assailed Bush for what he called the vice president's "failure" in the war on drugs.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Republican vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle on Saturday said U.S. diplomats often hamstring American exports and are out of touch with the needs and sentiments of most people in this country. "I can tell you that the person in the bureaucracy of the State Department has a far different idea of what makes America tick than the average man or woman on Main Street," Quayle said at a news conference while campaigning here.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Reagan, distressed by the increasingly destructive impact of the Iran- contras scandal on his ability to lead the nation, has begun to consider the rare step of going before a congressional committee and testifying about his role in the affair, Sen. Paul Laxalt (R-Nev.) said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | GEORGE SKELTON
Stu Spencer, guru of political gurus, towed three old Latino buddies to the side at his annual holiday party. "Here, listen to these guys," he said. "You don't need to quote me." Minutes later he returned with another, and then another. "They'll tell ya. . . . Hey Manuel, don't talk his ear off." Manuel Hidalgo, 67, East Los Angeles attorney. Frank Veiga, 59, East Los Angeles mortician. Albert Zapanta, 55, executive vice president of the U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Political consultant Stuart K. Spencer, who has managed Ronald Reagan's campaigns and has known the Reagans since 1965, added his voice Thursday to the chorus of denunciations of Kitty Kelley and her unauthorized biography of Nancy Reagan. Spencer, who is quoted several times in the book, said he never talked to Kelley. Others apparently did talk about events in which Spencer was involved, but he said some of the quotes attributed to him are "completely inaccurate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
Veteran Republican strategist Stuart K. Spencer, a close adviser to presidents and governors over the last several decades, had some advice Tuesday for new GOP national Chairman Lee Atwater: "He's got to spend less time with (blues guitarist) B.B. King and more time with national committeemen and committeewomen," Spencer said with a wink. "And he'll do all right." Then, directing his comments to two reporters, he added, "Put that in there: He'll do all right."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
A year or so ago, when top presidential advisers Ken Khachigian and Stu Spencer met at Tommy's Family Restaurant in San Clemente to jaw about politics, they came to this conclusion: It might be a kick to campaign with a vice presidential candidate. "I said, 'You know, actually, Stu, it might be more fun if we traveled with the vice presidential candidate. More independence.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
The media in the back of the plane were snarling about never getting to the candidate, the protective skein of handlers in the middle compartment was playing liar's poker and in the very front sat Dan Quayle, safely alone with his thoughts in his flying cocoon. Then the plane landed, the journalists rushed off to file the handout of the last speech and the candidate and his Secret Service guards raced off into the Washington night.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak
Since announcing her resignation, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has been pummeled by critics who have called her incoherent, a quitter, a joke and a "political train wreck." And those were fellow Republicans talking. Palin has been a polarizing figure from the moment she stepped off the tundra into the bright lights last summer as John McCain's surprise vice presidential running mate. Some of that hostility could be expected, given the hyper-partisanship of today's politics.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | KEITH LOVE and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
After weeks of giving Republican nominee George Bush an open field in California, Michael S. Dukakis' presidential campaign began blocking and tackling on Monday. Minutes before Bush spoke beside the San Diego harbor, Democratic Sen. Dennis DeConcini of Arizona held a press conference nearby and assailed Bush for what he called the vice president's "failure" in the war on drugs.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Republican vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle on Saturday said U.S. diplomats often hamstring American exports and are out of touch with the needs and sentiments of most people in this country. "I can tell you that the person in the bureaucracy of the State Department has a far different idea of what makes America tick than the average man or woman on Main Street," Quayle said at a news conference while campaigning here.
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